the right smile

Educating Patients on their Oral Health Options


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Dentist Sandy Springs: Tooth Loss linked to Depression and Anxiety

FearDr. R. Constance Wiener, a clinical scientist from West Virginia University, recently presented a research study titled “Association of Tooth Loss and Depression and Anxiety.”  Analysis involved frequency, Chi square analysis, and complex survey logistic regression.  Participants included 19 years or older, and had complete data on depression, anxiety and tooth loss.

Because of the complexity of factors related to periodontal disease and caries, individuals reporting dental anxiety may avoid dental care and individuals with depression may be negligent in self-care. In this study, researchers examined a potential association of tooth loss with depression and anxiety.  At the conclusion of this study, the researchers found that tooth loss can be an outcome of chronic illnesses like depression and anxiety.

Our experience is that we can overcome a lot of your anxiety and turn around many of its detrimental effects on your oral health care.  If we can be of service or help mitigate your dental anxiety, please contact us for an appointment.

Resource: R. Constance, MA, DMD, Phd. West Virginia University, Morgantown.  “Association of Tooth Loss and Depression and Anxiety” International & American Associations for Dental Research

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related Articles:

http://therightsmile.wordpress.com/tag/dental-anxiety/

https://therightsmile.wordpress.com/2011/06/15/dentist-sandy-springs-some-perceptions-never-change/


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Periodontist Sandy Springs: How much does Periodontal Treatment Cost

And will insurance cover it?

Root planingThis is an up and coming issue as our aged` population continues to grow.  While periodontal treatment is not as costly as replacing teeth due to tooth loss, its cost can vary greatly depending upon your needs.  Quite frankly, there is no way of really telling just how advanced your gum disease is without a proper diagnosis.  It can be as simple as gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) or periodontitis (disease of the bone supporting the teeth).  Because periodontal infection grows under your gums, you can have no symptoms at all.  More advanced cases range from red, swollen, tender gums to bad breath to loose or shifting teeth.

As it relates to insurance coverage, the best way to check scaling and root planing or periodontal maintenance is to have your dentist send a pretreatment in for the work that needs to be completed.  Fees for traditional root planing can range from $280 to $385 per quadrant (there are usually 4 quadrants)[1].  Add to this the fees for an antibiotic placed under the gums during treatment.  This antibiotic known as Arestin[2] is charged out at $55-$110 per area.  If a patient has multiple deep pockets in one quadrant the fees can add up quickly.   Depending on the effectiveness of this approach it may be repeated every few months, annually, or every three years.[3]

If you have dental insurance, they may provide full or partial coverage. Our office is happy to contact your insurance company to learn what they will cover.  We do accept assignment of most insurance benefits. In such cases, your responsibility will be to cover only the remainder. We generally ask that you pay for X-rays, and regular cleanings while we have your statement submitted to your insurance company.

Everyone deserves to keep their natural teeth for a lifetime. We feel that finances never should be an obstacle to treatment. For your convenience, we offer several payment options and payment plans to suit your individual needs. Our staff will be happy to answer any of your financial or insurance questions.  Please give us a call for your complimentary consultation.

Dr. William Zinney, is our in-house periodontist.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

Right Smile Center

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

[1] However, the cost may be less if less teeth are involved.

[2] ARESTIN is a prescription antibiotic approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is used together with scaling and root planing (SRP) and is placed by your provider for the treatment of periodontal (gum) disease.

[3] http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/rdh/2001/12/journal-of-periodontology-publishes-study-on-effectiveness-of-arestin-on-periodontal-disease.html

 


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Sandy Springs: Dental health a marker for heart disease?

Hygiene examMore than 15,000 patients with chronic coronary heart disease provided information on their dental health, with results showing that indicators of periodontal disease (fewer remaining teeth, gum bleeding) were common in this patient group and associated with numerous cardiovascular and socioeconomic risk factors.[1]  Conversely, a lower prevalence of tooth loss was associated with lower levels of cardio vascular disease risk factors, including lower glucose levels, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, systolic blood pressure, and waist circumference.[2] Diabetes and smoking were also less prevalent among patients with more teeth, while the likelihood of higher education, alcohol consumption and work stress was greater.

Results showed a high overall prevalence of tooth loss: 16% reported having no teeth, and 41% reported having fewer than 15 remaining teeth.[3] Approximately one-quarter of the patients (26%) reported gum bleeding when brushing teeth.[4] However, there was some variation in these results depending on region, country and ethnic group, with the highest rates of tooth loss and gum bleeding found in Eastern Europe. Overall, almost 70% of participants were current or former smokers.

However, Dr. Ola Vedin from the University of Sweden added, the observation that poor dental health among chronic coronary patients is linked to a heavier cardiovascular risk burden does not prove a causal link between the two conditions.[5]  But it may prove to be a marker or indicator of heart disease.  As a result we would not go so far as to advocate rigorous dental hygiene measures as a strategy to reduce cardiovascular risk.  What might be examined is the need to refer patients to a physician for further examination of their global health.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related Articles

https://therightsmile.wordpress.com/2014/03/25/dentist-sandy-springs-reduce-heart-risks/

http://therightsmile.wordpress.com/tag/heart-disease/

http://therightsmilecenter.blogspot.com/2012/08/dentist-roswell-gum-disease-linked-to.html

 

[1] The European Journal of Preventive Cardiology: a journal of the European Society of Cardiology

[2] Ibid.

[3] Vedin O, Hagstro¨m E, Gallup D, et al. Periodontal disease in patients with chronic coronary heart disease: Prevalence and association with cardiovascular risk factors. Eur J Prevent Cardiol 2014; DOI: 10.1177/2047487314530660.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.


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Dentist Dunwoody: To Remove or Not to Remove

shakespeare-with-skullDental Amalgam and Other Restorative Materials.

According to Dr. Oz, mercury is a powerful neurotoxin and therefore, at certain levels, can cause neurological issues, autoimmune disease, chronic illnesses and mental disorders; you should remove your amalgam fillings.  The burning question is whether an unknown quantity of mercury vapor in our silver fillings at a constant exposure poses a significant health risk.

Based on current scientific data the ADA has concluded that the removal of amalgam restorations from a non-allergic patient for the alleged purpose of removing toxic substances as indicated by Dr. Oz, when such treatment is performed solely at the recommendation of the dentist, is improper and unethical.  Any dentist who claims that dental treatment or diagnostic techniques performed by the dentist has the capacity to diagnose, cure or alleviate diseases, infections or other conditions without being based upon accepted scientific knowledge or research, is acting unethically.

Yet there are conflicting studies between Sweden and the United States. In Sweden, they have conducted a number of studies where people, with pre-existing neurological and health issues (Chronic Fatigue-type symptoms), had amalgams removed; 78% reported improvement in their health status. In the United States, official studies hired by the FDA and National Institutes of Health (NIH) stated that “the current data is insufficient to support an association between mercury release from amalgams and the various complaints that have been attributed to this restorative material.”[1]

The problem is there is no direct evidence of a cause and an effect, only a correlation.  So the question remains ‘to remove or not to remove’.   Your dentist has an ethical duty to be honest and trustworthy and telling you to remove your amalgam fillings for health reasons violates that ethical duty.  So what’s a patient to do?  Unfortunately, no one is really sure.

This probably doesn’t answer your question of what to do, but it does help you understand what your dentist is supposed to do.  Have your dentist examine your fillings to determine whether or not they are intact, and have a conversation about the potential health risks of keeping or removing amalgams. Discuss the options available with your provider to help make a smart decision.  And if we can be of service please feel free to give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

 

[1] http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/toxic-teeth-are-our-amalgam-fillings-safe


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Cosmetic Dentistry? Dunwoody

Golden-EggGenerally, cosmetic dentistry performed by a general dentist is centered around improving your appearance, not the functioning of your teeth nor your bite.  Many dentists refer to themselves as ‘cosmetic dentists’ regardless of their lack of specific education, specialty, training, or experience in the field. This has been considered unethical particularly as it relates to the objective of marketing to patients.[1]  Cosmetic dentistry  has never been recognized by the American Dental Association as a formal specialty area of dentistry.[2][3]  Yet, there are still dentists that promote themselves as cosmetic dentists. It’s misleading and infers that a ‘cosmetic dentist’ has some form of credentialed training.  Ironically, ‘cosmetic dentists’ continue to tout themselves as members of the ADA.

Unfortunately, merely correcting the patients aesthetics without giving consideration as to how the mouth functions is a disservice to the patient.  There are only 2 specialties recognized by the ADA that consider the patient’s aesthetics and function during treatment, prosthodontists and orthodontists.  They are formally trained specialists[4] recognized by the ADA that undergo a minimum of 2–3 years full-time rigorous education program after dental school graduation.  These specialties are the paths that lead to board certification approved by the ADA.  Forbes Magazine ranks Prosthodontists as the rarest dental specialist in the U.S.

So the next time you are contemplating ‘cosmetic dentistry’ consider a Pro, a Prosthodontist.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

Prosthodontist

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3658

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 

[1]  Maihofer MG (February 2009). “Cosmetic dentistry is not a recognized specialty”. The Journal of the Michigan Dental Association 91 (2): 18. PMID 19288658.

[2] Ibid

[3] “American Association of Public Health Dentistry”.

[4] Dentist trained in a post doctorate university program.


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Dunwoody ǁ Teeth Cleaning

mature womanProfessional cleanings are the key to a healthy smile.  And a healthy smile starts with health gums.  If you or your family have not had a professional cleaning recently, please consider the importance of regular cleanings and maintenance of your dental and global health. Regular cleanings will keep you healthy and save your smile in the long run.  While skipping your cleanings costs money and your health.[1]

The ADA recommends the following for good oral hygiene:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day with an ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste.
  • Clean between teeth daily with floss or an interdental cleaner. Decay-causing bacteria lingers between teeth where brush bristles can’t reach.
  • Flossing removes plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line.  While some study results[2] indicate the use of a mouth rinse can be as effective as flossing for reducing plaque between the teeth, the ADA recommends brushing twice a day and cleaning between teeth with floss or interdental cleaners once each day to remove plaque from all tooth surfaces. Plaque is responsible for both tooth decay and gum disease.
  • Eat a balanced diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Visit us regularly for professional cleanings and oral exams.
  • Talk with us about what types of oral care products are most effective for you. The ADA Seal on a product is your assurance that it has met ADA criteria for safety and effectiveness. Look for the ADA Seal on fluoride toothpaste, toothbrushes, floss, interdental cleaners, oral irrigators, mouth rinses and other oral hygiene products.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three or four months (or sooner) if the bristles become frayed. A worn toothbrush will not do a good job of cleaning your teeth[3].

 It is possible to have periodontal disease and have no warning signs, which is one reason why regular dental checkups and periodontal examinations are very important. Treatment methods depend upon the type of disease and how far the condition has progressed. Good oral hygiene at home is essential to help keep periodontal disease from becoming more serious or recurring. You don’t have to lose teeth to periodontal disease.

Schedule dental visits for you and your family today by calling The Right Smile Center in Sandy Springs at 404-256-3620. Our dental office is conveniently located on Carpenter Drive in Sandy Springs, and we serve patients from Sandy Springs, Roswell, Dunwoody, Alpharetta, Johns Creek, Buckhead, Marietta, East Cobb and surrounding communities. We welcome new patients and will be happy to answer all of your questions with a complimentary visit. Our team includes in-house periodontal specialists.  We look forward to making you, and your loved ones, smile!

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

 

Related articles

 

[1] http://therightsmilecenter.blogspot.com/2013/07/dentist-sandy-springs-skipping-your.html

 

[2] Sharma, et. al., Am. J. Dent. 15:351-355, 2002. Bauroth, et.al., J. Am. Dent. Assn. 134:359-365, Mar 2003

[3] Children’s toothbrushes often need replacing more frequently than adults because they can wear out sooner.

 


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Dunwoody Dental: Coconuts about Dentistry

coconutAccording to researchers, 60 to 90 percent of children in industrialized nations are affected by tooth decay or cavities.  But scientists from the Athlone Institute of Technology in Ireland found that coconut oil which had been treated with enzymes stopped the growth of Streptococcus bacteria–a common cause of tooth decay.[1]  Also, enzyme-treated coconut oil inhibited growth of Candida albicans that causes thrush, a yeast infection characterized by whitish, velvety sores in the mouth and tongue.[2]

“Incorporating enzyme-modified coconut oil into dental hygiene products would be an attractive alternative to chemical additives, particularly as it works at relatively low concentrations. Also, with increasing antibiotic resistance, it is important that we turn our attention to new ways to combat microbial infection,” said lead author Dr. Damien Brady from Athlone Institute of Technology (AIT).  This use of coconut oil in dental care products such as toothpaste and mouthwash could be an attractive alternative to current chemical additives.

The nice aspect of this is coconut oil may be selective by leaving healthy bacteria in place to help protect your teeth, rather than the typical broad spectrum products that indiscernibly wipe out all of your mouth’s bacteria. We will keep you updated as more research is published.  If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 

[1] The study was presented at the Society for General Microbiology’s autumn conference at the University of Warwick.

[2] Ibid.

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