the right smile

Educating Patients on their Oral Health Options


Leave a comment

Dentist Acworth: Gum disease linked to infertility

According to research presented at the American Academy of Periodontology conference in 2004, gum disease is linked to women who use infertility treatments.[1] The study said women undergoing infertility treatment for more than three menstrual cycles experience increased inflammation and bleeding of the gums. These women also have increased levels of gingival crevicular fluid, which contains tissue breakdown products that may be markers for the progression of gum disease.[2]

The lead author Dr. Cenk M. Haytac, from Cukurova University in Adana, Turkey, postulates that these effects occur because these agents increase body levels of estrogen and the gums apparently are a target for estrogen since they contain estrogen receptors.  Though not definitive, several studies have shown evidence that gum infections are associated with unsuccessful embryo development or the failure of in-vitro fertilization. Poor oral health is as bad for fertility as obesity – delaying conception by about two months says latest research.[3]

Experts at the annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Sweden were presented with evidence how women with gum disease took over seven months to conceive, compared to the usual five months. The researchers believe the underlying cause is inflammation. Unchecked, this can set off a chain of reactions capable of damaging the body’s normal workings.

Periodontal disease has already been linked with heart disease, type 2 diabetes and miscarriage, plus poor sperm quality in men.  An Australian study involving over 3,700 women indicated that those with gum disease had raised blood levels of markers for inflammation.[4]   Although speculative, as a precaution researchers suggest that the treatment of gum disorders might influence the outcome of infertility treatment.  According to Dr. Michael P. Rethman, president of the AAP, “[i]t is reasonable to assume that if low levels of plaque are established and maintained during the infertility treatment, gingival inflammation would not affect the success of infertility treatment,”  “[which] would require meticulous oral hygiene and routine professional cleanings, perhaps at the beginning of each menstrual cycle to ensure the presence of healthy gums.”

Professor Roger Hart advises women trying to get pregnant to get a check-up by their dentist along with other measures like stopping smoking and drinking, maintaining a healthy weight and taking folic acid supplements.  UK fertility expert Dr. Allan Pacey said, “It’s common sense advice really to make sure you are in a healthy condition [including good oral health] if you want to try for a baby.” Around 10% of the population is believed to have severe periodontal disease.[5]

So if you are trying to get pregnant and are unsure of your oral health please see your dentist.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles


[1]Journal of Periodontology, June 2004

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ananya Mandal, MD. Gum Disease Linked to Infertility. (2011)

[4] Professor Roger Hart, of the University of Western Australia.

[5] Gum disease linked to infertility http://www.news-medical.net/news/20110707/Gum-disease-linked-to-infertility.aspx. Screen clipping taken: 8/30/2011 5:09 PM  Posted in: Women’s Health News


1 Comment

Dentist Acworth – Oral Cancer Awareness

According to The Oral Cancer Foundation, there are two distinct causes of oral cancer. One, which I have mentioned in an earlier article is through the use of tobacco (and alcohol), a long time historic environmental cause, and the other is through the exposure to the HPV-16 virus (human papilloma virus version 16), which is a newly identified etiology, and apparently the same one which is responsible for the vast majority of cervical cancers in women.  And a small number (under 5 %) of people acquire oral cancers from no currently identifiable cause, presumably caused by some genetic predisposition similar to other cancer causing agents.

While most think this is a rare form of cancer, mouth cancer (popularly thought to be the result of chewing tobacco) is diagnosed in about 100 individuals each day here in the US alone, and one person dies from oral cancer every hour of every day.  If you add the sub category of laryngeal throat cancers like Michael Douglas was recently treated for (and most likely a result of his smoking and consumption of alcohol), the rates of occurrence accounting for about 10,000 additional new cases per year, then the death rate is significantly higher.   But these statistics can be drastically reduced when found at the early stages of development.  With early diagnosis, oral cancer patients have an 80 to 90 % survival rate.

Unfortunately at this time, the majority of cases are found as late stage cancers, and this accounts for the very high death rate of about 45% at five years from diagnosis.  The reason for these late stage diagnoses is not because these cancers are hard to discover, rather it is because of a lack of public awareness.  The American Dental Association states that only 60% of the US population sees a dentist every year, which leaves 40% to happenstance.    If heightened public awareness were coupled with a national program for screenings, diagnosis of oral cancers would yield early discovery by both medical and dental professionals.

Ironically, it is potentially easier to obtain public compliance to oral cancer screenings, because unlike many other cancer screening procedures, there is no invasive technique required to look for it, no discomfort or pain involved, and it is very inexpensive to have your mouth examined for the early signs of disease.  Realistically, it only costs about $35.00, usually 10 times less than a blood test at your annual physical.

It is important that patients realize that a visit to the dentist is no longer about a filling, a crown, or a postponable cleaning, but actually an exam that is a matter of life and death.  It’s important for patients and dentists to start a dialog today.  Even if talking about cancer is difficult, there are mechanisms around this.  Creating awareness, discovery and diagnosis is the purpose of April being Oral Cancer Awareness Month.  So when it comes to oral cancer and saving lives, these are primary responsibilities of the dental community.  The most important step in reducing the death rate from oral cancer is early discovery.  And no group has a better opportunity to have an impact than members of the dental community.   If our practice can be of help we are offering free cancer screening during the month of April.

 

Some Research and statistics provided by: The Oral Cancer Foundation.  Kuper H, Adami HO, Boffetta P (June 2002). “Tobacco use, cancer causation and public health impact”. Journal of internal medicine 251 (6): 455–66. Seitz HK, Pöschl G, Simanowski UA (1998). “Alcohol and cancer”. Recent developments in alcoholism : an official publication of the American Medical Society on Alcoholism, the Research Society on Alcoholism, and the National Council on Alcoholism. “Screening for Oral Cancer”. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2004. http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/uspsoral.htm.

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC                                                                              

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

www.rightsmileacworth.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 


1 Comment

Dentist Acworth: 8 Windows your overall health sees through dentistry.

I read this article the other day by the Mayo Clinic staff and it appears very much worth republishing.  Please read this and adjust your life accordingly.  It’s really not that difficult to lead a healthy life style and live longer lives.

 

Oral health: A window to your overall health

Your oral health is more important than you may realize. Get the facts about how the health of your mouth, teeth and gums may affect your general health.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Did you know that your oral health can offer clues about your overall health? Or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Understand the intimate connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.

What’s the connection between oral health and overall health?

Your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless. Normally the body’s natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, harmful bacteria can sometimes grow out of control and cause oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease. In addition, dental procedures, medications, or treatments that reduce saliva flow, disrupt the normal balance of bacteria in your mouth or breach the mouth’s normal protective barriers may make it easier for bacteria to enter your bloodstream.

What conditions may be linked to oral health?

Your oral health may affect, be affected by or contribute to various diseases and conditions, including:

  • Endocarditis. Gum disease and dental procedures that cut your gums may allow bacteria to enter your bloodstream. If you have a weak immune system or a damaged heart valve, this can cause infection in other parts of the body — such as an infection of the inner lining of the heart (endocarditis).
  • Cardiovascular disease. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke may be linked to oral bacteria, possibly due to chronic inflammation from periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Gum disease has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes reduces the body’s resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk. In addition, people who have inadequate blood sugar control may develop more-frequent and severe infections of the gums and the bone that holds teeth in place, and they may lose more teeth than do people who have good blood sugar control.
  • HIV/AIDS. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.
  • Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — may be associated with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.
  • Alzheimer’s disease. Tooth loss before age 35 may be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Other conditions. Other conditions that may be linked to oral health include Sjogren’s syndrome — an immune system disorder — and eating disorders.

Be sure to tell your dentist if you’re taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you’ve had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition.

How can I protect my oral health?

To protect your oral health, resolve to practice good oral hygiene every day. For example:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three to four months.
  • Floss daily.
  • Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Schedule regular dental checkups.

Also, watch for signs and symptoms of oral disease and contact your dentist as soon as a problem arises. Remember, taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health. Pasted from <http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dental/DE00001/NSECTIONGROUP=2>

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmileacworth.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles


Leave a comment

Dentist Woodstock: How Much Do Dental Bridges Cost?

The cost of dental bridges varies depending on the type of bridge and complexity of the bridge required[1], the expertise of your dentist and the area of town in which the procedure is performed. Typically a dental bridge cost ranges from $900-1400 per tooth. Dental insurance will typically pay a percentage of the fee, usually half, depending on the individual dental plan.

It is important to keep your remaining teeth healthy and strong as the success of the bridge (depending on the type selected) depends on the solid foundation offered by the surrounding teeth. Brushing twice a day and flossing daily helps prevent tooth decay and gum disease that can lead to tooth loss. Your dentist or dental hygienist can demonstrate how to properly brush and floss your teeth. Keeping a regular cleaning schedule will help diagnose problems at an early stage when treatment has a better prognosis.  With proper care a dental bridges can last 5 to 15 years and even longer. With good oral hygiene and regular checkups, it is not unusual for the life span of a fixed bridge to be over 10 years.

If you’re a new patient, there’s often an initial office visit ($65-$102) and X-rays ($85-$135).  One must not forget that there are additional costs that contribute to the overall price involved in dental bridges, aside from the material and type of bridge chosen which are beyond the patient’s control.  The cost above does not include the costs for any anchoring on either side of the bridge.  So a 3 unit bridge could cost around $3,500 to $5,000.  A large share of undervalued costs goes toward the treatment itself, lab and production costs for the bridge, aftercare and the like.

Dental care on a whole is often considered expensive.  And depending upon the general wear and tear a bridge is exposed to and how well you keep your teeth free of plaque, it could last indefinitely.  With somewhere between 10 and indefinitely, the investment becomes rather modest, if not inexpensive.

In the alternative, if the cost escalates, you might want to consider a single dental implant with a cost of around $4000 to $6000.[2]  The benefit on an implant over your lifetime could be less expensive than a bridge and is the more natural state of the art replacement of a missing tooth.   If we can be of service or answer any of your questions please do not hesitate to give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Related articles


[1] Is should be noted that both location of the missing tooth, the number of teeth involved or missing or whether there are virgin teeth or repaired teeth in front or behind the missing teeth come into play in the decision making process.

[2] The recommended standard of care for a single tooth missing is a single unit implant.  However, there are limiting factors, including insurance coverage that come into play in the decision making process.


Leave a comment

Dentist Acworth: How Much Do Dental X-rays Cost?

A single dental x-ray would cost between $28-38. Four check-up or bitewing x-rays may cost between $60-80, and a full mouth series (18 x-rays) or panoramic x-ray would cost between $100-200. If it’s a new practice or mature one that is trying to build or rebuild its patient base, often the x-rays will bundled with an examination that ends up costing the patient virtually nothing.  Most dental insurance covers x-rays at 100%. It is usually considered a diagnostic or preventive service.

If you are a new patient, the dentist should recommend x-rays to determine the present status of your oral health and to help identify changes that may occur later.  They give your dentist a baseline of your present condition.  A new set of x-rays may be needed to help your dentist detect any new cavities, determine the status of your gum health or evaluate the growth and development of your teeth. If a previous dentist has any radiographs of you, your new dentist may ask you for copies of them.

We take four bitewings (which show us in between the back teeth to check for cavities).

Sometimes we take a full series of images (18 images or so…which show us cavities plus also shows us bone levels and nerve health).

A panoramic image is a single image of the entire upper and lower arch. This requires a different machine and can cost $125-175 or more. It shows the entire mouth on one image.

Many diseases of the oral cavity (which includes the teeth and surrounding tissues and bone) cannot be seen when the dentist examines your mouth.

Dental x-rays are used to diagnose or detect tooth decay, impacted teeth, jaw problems, abscessed (infected) teeth, or current filling placement.  An x-ray exam can help your dentist see the small areas of decay between the teeth and fillings; bone damage from a tooth infection or cyst; bone loss due to periodontal (gum) disease; developmental defects; some types of tumors; the effects of trauma; and the position on unerupted teeth in children and adults.  Dental x-rays can also reveal bone loss from periodontal (gum) disease, locate tarter build-up, find foreign bodies within the gum or bone, and see if there is enough bone for the placement of dental implants.

Finding and treating dental problems at an early stage can save time, money and unneeded discomfort and help prevent more serious health problems.  A good dentist will tailor a treatment plan to your finances, altering the ideal treatment as much as possible to help you be able to afford it.  If we can be of help, please do hesitate to call, email or make an appointment to be seen.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road

Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmileacworth.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Related articles


1 Comment

Dentist Woodstock: How Much Does a Root Canal Cost?

The cost of having a root canal done depends upon where you live, the type of dentist and whether or not you have dental insurance.  The procedure is usually done by a specialist known as an endodontist, but can be performed by a general dentist.  The procedure can range anywhere from $900 to 1500.00 depending on the tooth location and the number of root canals involved.  The diagnosis will require an initial x-ray, which can be performed by your general dentist and forwarded to the endodontist’s office.  Sometimes there are issues that arise where the endodontist wants to charge for an initial consultation.  This may or may not be necessary depending on the relationship the endodontist has with your referring general practitioner.  If you have insurance it will usually cover about half to eighty percent of the cost.  One of the added costs to a root canal that should be taken into account is either an amalgam (or composite) or crown restoration of the tooth by your general dentist upon completion of the procedure.

The root canal involves opening the tooth and removing the pulp of the tooth, which contains the tooth nerve that’s causing you so much pain.  What necessitates the procedure is the root of the tooth being infected and no known treatment to preserve the nerve from further deterioration.  The two most common causes of infection of the pulp are deep cavities and fractures or broken teeth. As treatment, the pulp tissue is removed, the root is cleaned with files and filled with an inorganic material that keeps bacteria out of the root and tooth.   Generally, a root/nerve involved tooth only gets worse over time without treatment.  And the longer you wait, sometimes results in the loss of the entire tooth.

Prices don’t always reflect the quality of your treatment.  Having a sense of trust in your general dentist will usually result in the referral to an endodontist that’s also worth trusting.  If we can be of service or you have further questions please don’t hesitate to contact us by phone or by email.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road

Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Related articles


Leave a comment

Dentist Sandy Springs: Symptoms and Signs of Oral Cancer

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month, so learn more about it.  If you or a loved one have any of the following symptoms please take the time to see your dentist. These common signs and symptoms could indicate you have oral cancer, particularly if you have seen these symptoms persist for two weeks or longer:                               

1.  a sore in the mouth that bleeds easily or doesn’t heal

2.  a color change in any of the oral tissues, including gums, lips or tongue

3.  a lump, thickening or a small eroded area

4.  any pain, tenderness or numbness in the mouth, throat or lips

5.  possible trouble chewing, swallowing or moving your jaw or tongue

In the U.S. every year, over 30,000 people were diagnosed with oral cancer.  But remember, oral cancer doesn’t always present symptoms in the early stages.  That’s why it’s important to get screened annually.  When detected and treated early, oral cancer patients have a nearly 90% survival rate.

I have written about this twice this month, but I want to make sure I get the point across.   They say 3 times the charm.  Please make an appointment to see your dentist if you have any of the symptoms described above. It really could save your life.  We offer free screening to anyone during the month of April.  We think every little bit counts and would like to give back to the community where we can.  So if we can be of assistance please feel free to contact us and make an appointment.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related Articles


Leave a comment

Dentist Acworth – April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month

Each year more than 30,000 Americans are diagnosed with oral cancer and approximately 8,000 will die of the disease.  According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI)  oral cancer, which is more common than leukemia, Hodgkin’s disease, and cancers of the brain, liver, bone, thyroid gland, stomach, ovaries, and cervix, is a major cause of death and disfigurement in the United States.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) located here in Atlanta, GA., approximately 75% of all oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers—mouth, tongue, lips, throat,  nose, and larynx— can be attributed to the use of  tobacco related products.  Those who choose to use cigarettes, cigars, pipes, chewing tobacco, or snuff, place themselves at a much higher risk of developing oral cancer and other diseases, such as heart disease, emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

 

With the level of prevalence described above, the oral cancer screening routinely performed during one’s hygiene and dental examination is one of the most critical preventative  components of  your bi-annual visits to the dentist .

If you find anything out of the ordinary during a self-examination—particularly anything that does not heal or go away in two weeks, or that has recently changed— make sure you discuss it with your dentist or physician.   April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month and we offer free cancer screening, so please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or concerns.

 

Source: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research’s (NIDCR) National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse in partnership with the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Nursing Research, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Friends of the NIDCR.

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road

Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Related Articles

Woodstock Dentist: I read this on Webmd.com (therightsmile.wordpress.com)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,094 other followers