Dentist Woodstock, GA: What [5] Questions Do Patients Ask About Dental Implants?

I read this article by Jim Du Molin and thought it might be interesting to readers and my patients.

 

We (I’m assuming Jim Du Molin) conducted a survey that asked dentists what questions dental patients ask when considering getting implants. It turns out that there’s a real difference between the questions dental implant patients do ask — and which questions they should be asking.

Dentists responded with the following . . .

The top 5 questions dental patients ask –                              

  1. 1.      How much do dental implants cost?
  2. 2.      How long do dental implants last?
  3. 3.      Are implants painful?
  4. 4.      How long will it take to get my new teeth?
  5. 5.      Does dental insurance cover implant surgery?

Versus . . .

The top 5 questions dentists want patients to ask –

  1. 1.      Am I a good candidate for implants?
  2. 2.      What are the potential complications of dental implant therapy?
  3. 3.      How much implant experience does the doctor have?
  4. 4.      What is the healing time for my implants?
  5. 5.      Can implants improve my appearance?

Many dental implant patients seem to have the same questions about dental implant therapy. Unfortunately, these questions aren’t necessarily the ones dentists think they should be asking.

The 2 main questions patients ask are –

  1. 1.      How much do dental implants cost?
  2. 2.      Will dental implant surgery be painful?

When dentists feel their very first question should be –

  1. 1.      Am I a good candidate for dental implants?

There is really a disconnect between the doctor and patient. This really is no surprise, since patients are thinking about how they are going to pay for the implants, and whether the procedure will be painful.

But doctors can’t afford not to address the primary concerns of the patient first: cost and pain.

One dentist wrote, “Long term, when the conditions are favorable, proper bone density, height and width, proper biomechanical considerations, proper occlusal load. A dental implant is more cost effective over a 3 unit bridge. However, when the above conditions are not meet — the 3 unit bridge (with sufficient ferule, impressions taken with custom made tray and properly impressioned, properly articulated, preprosthetic endodontic treatment performed by an endodontist, core-restoration — not in composite) will be more cost effective (for the patient).”

If you would like to learn more about implants and your candidacy please call or email your question.

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

 

 

Pasted from <http://www.thewealthydentist.com/blog/1509/survey-what-questions-do-patients-ask-about-dental-implants/>

 

 

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Woodstock, GA: Dentist: Teeth Grinding (Bruxism)

Bruxism, otherwise known as teeth grinding, is when you clench (tightly hold your top and bottom teeth together) or grind (slide your teeth back and forth over each other) your teeth, that may or may not cause harm.  When teeth clenching or grinding occurs on a regular basis the teeth may become damaged and possible other possible oral health issues may develop.

People may clench and grind their teeth without being aware of it during both the day and night.  When it is sleep-related, bruxism is often the bigger problem because of the lack of control.  Because it does occur during sleep most people are unaware of the problem until symptoms begin to arise.  While some of these symptoms are headaches or a sore jaw, they are masked by other factors such as too much stress, inability to relax, misalignment of the teeth, or even ones posture or diet.[1]

The cause of bruxism is not completely agreed upon, but daily stress may be the precipitant in many cases.  The clenching the teeth may be brought on by anxiety, stress or depression.  Other symptoms may include ear aches, insomnia and/or sensitivity in the teeth.[2]  The clenching or grinding puts pressure on the muscles, tissues, and other structures around your jaw. The symptoms may develop into temporomandibular joint problems, commonly referred to as TMJ.

If you suspect you may be grinding your teeth, talk to your dentist.  An examination can rule out other disorders that may cause similar jaw pain or ear pain, including:

  • Dental disorders
  • Ear disorders such as ear infections
  • Problems with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ)

Your dentist can examine your mouth and jaw for signs of bruxism, such as jaw tenderness and abnormalities in your teeth.  If it is diagnosed as night grinding, you can be fitted with a mouth or night guard (a splint) to prevent further damage to your teeth and other issues mentioned above.  The varying types of splints may prevent clenching and create a scenario where your mouth remains relaxed during sleep or during the day.  There are many approaches to retard the clenching behavior, many of which are more successful to daytime clench and grinders verses night clenchers.

Given that grinding and clenching may not fall within any one medical discipline, it may take a combination of approaches to permanently solve the problem.  However, dentist would appear to have the leg up on the other disciplines, given the amount of training and experience dentists have with your oral health.  Regardless, call the health care provider you are comfortable with to seek solutions to this potentially damaging oral health problem.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

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[1] ADA and the National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002386/, Feb. 22, 2010.

[2]    Ibid.

Acworth Dentist: I read this on Webmd.com

…. and thought it was a very practical approach to your dental care:

 

Your Oral Health Care Plan

Good oral health involves more than just brushing. To keep your teeth and mouth healthy for a lifetime of use, there are steps that you should follow. Here’s what you should consider:

1. Understand your own oral health needs.

Talk with your dentist, other oral health care specialist, or hygienist about any special conditions in your mouth and any ways in which your medical/health conditions affect your teeth or oral health. For example, cancer treatments, pregnancy, heart diseases, diabetes, dental appliances (dentures, braces) can all impact your oral health and may necessitate a change in the care of your mouth and/or teeth. Be sure to tell your dentist if you have experienced a change in your general health or in any medications you are taking since your last dental visit.

2. Develop, then follow, a daily oral health routine.

Based on discussions with your dentist, other oral health care specialist, and hygienist and considering your unique general health and oral health situations, develop an oral health routine that is easy to follow on a daily basis. For example, people with special conditions – such as pregnancy, diabetes and other underlying diseases, orthodontic appliances – may require additional instruction and perhaps treatments to keep their mouth healthy. Make sure you understand the additional care and/or treatment that is needed, commit to the extra tasks, and work them into your daily health routine.

3. Use fluoride.

Children and adults benefit from fluoride use. Fluoride strengthens developing teeth in children and prevents tooth decay in both children and adults. Toothpastes and mouth rinses contain fluoride. Fluoride levels in tap water may not be high enough without supplementation to prevent tooth decay. Contact your water utility to determine the level for your area. Talk with your dentist about your fluoride needs. Ask if fluoride supplements or a higher strength, prescription-only fluoride product is necessary for you.

4. Brush and floss daily.

Brush your teeth at least twice a day (morning and before bed time) and floss at least once a day. Better still would be to brush after every meal and snack. These activities remove plaque, which if not removed, combines with sugars to form acids that lead to tooth decay. Bacterial plaque also causes gum disease and other periodontal diseases.

5. Eat a balanced diet and limit snacking.

Eat a variety of foods, but eat fewer foods that contain sugars and starches (for example, cookies, cakes, pies, candies, ice cream, dried fruits and raisins, soft drinks, potato chips). These foods produce the most acids in the mouth, which begin the decay process. If you must snack, brush your teeth afterward or chew sugarless gum.

6. If you use tobacco products, quit.

Smoking cigarettes or using smokeless tobacco products increases your risk of oral cancer and cancers of the larynx, pharynx and esophagus; gum disease; as well as causes bad breath, tooth discoloration, and contribute to other oral and general health problems.

7. Examine your mouth regularly.

Become familiar with the appearance of your own mouth and teeth through frequent examination. This way, you will be able to catch any changes at an early stage and have these changes examined by a dentist. Look for the development of any spots, lesions, cuts, swellings, or growths on your gums, tongue, cheeks, inside of your lips, and floor and roof of your mouth. Examine your teeth for any signs of chipping or cracking, discoloration, and looseness. If you experience a change in your bite or develop pain, call your dentist as soon as possible. An oral examination is particularly important to conduct if you are a tobacco user, since you are at an increased risk of developing oral cancer.

8. Visit your dentist regularly.

The standard recommendation is to visit your dentist twice a year for check-ups and cleanings. Talk with your dentist about the frequency that is best for you considering your oral health situation.

9. Develop a partnership with your dentist.

Don’t be afraid to ask your dentist for more information if you don’t understand a treatment or procedure. You should be able to have a free and frank discussion with your dentist about the following types of issues:

  • What are the treatment options for a particular dental condition?
  • How do these options differ in cost and in their durability?
  • Do all the options solve the problem? What are the benefits and drawbacks of each option?
  • Of the dental treatments being recommended, which are absolutely necessary, which are less urgent, which are elective, and which are merely cosmetic?
  • What are the consequences of delaying treatment?
  • How much will the treatment cost?
  • When is payment due?
  • What method of payment does your dentist expect?
  • Do you have a clear understanding of all fees and methods and schedules of payment?

Novy Scheinfeld DDS PC 5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmileacworth.com

info@rightsmilecenter.comFurther Reading:

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