Cavities – the mouth is connected to the body

special-needs1It is not merely semantics, but rather a paradigm shift in thinking to consider dental caries (cavities) as a ‘complex disease caused by an imbalance in physiologic equilibrium between tooth mineral and biofilm fluid’.[1]  A consequence of dental caries being a complex disease is that on a population basis we may have success with a particular preventive oral program in one select segment of population in our country, but not necessarily in another segment with different cultural and behavioral habits. Moreover, society and the dental community may need to organize our dental health care very differently in neighboring counties, and apply fluorides, tooth brushing protocols and flossing in very different ways (mouth rinsing, toothpaste, water fluoridation and supervised brushing etc.) to obtain rather similar caries reductions from one locale to another.

Contrary to urban lore, the mouth is connected to the body.  So, whatever directions caries research should take from here it will require a multidisciplinary approach to solving complex problems and should be included in a well-planned healthcare approach. More than ever, well-educated clinical dentists set the stage and should be included in collaboration with colleagues trained in the multitude of new fields in the basic sciences (biophysics, functional genomics, proteomics, chemical biology, nano-technology, etc.) to address clinically relevant questions.

A higher standard of oral healthcare well planned.  Get the facts, ask the Right Smile Center.  If we can be of assistance, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

[1] Fejerskov O, Nyvad B: Is dental caries an infectious disease? Diagnostic and treatment consequences for the practitioner; in Schou L (ed): Nordic Dentistry 2003 Yearbook. Copenhagen, Quintessence Publishing, 2003, pp 141– 151.

Stop smoking—anything

The evidE-Cigarettesence is indisputable, smoking increases your risk of cancer, including oral cancer of the lips and larynx.  We also know that smoking contributes to numerous other health complications.

As a result we have seen the rise of E-cigarettes, also known as vapor cigarettes.  However, E-cigarettes may not be the safe alternative you think. Several studies are finding that E-cigarettes contain certain chemicals and toxins that may contribute to the risk of cancer.  E-cigarettes, as an example, contain  toxic chemicals found in antifreeze and numerous cancer-causing chemicals, such as nitrosamines.[1]

We hope this advice will lead to your decision to cease smoking anything and everything.  If we can be of assistance do not hesitate to call us for a consultation.

Right Smile Center, LLC

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

4047-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

[1] http://www.cancer.net/navigating-cancer-care/prevention-and-healthy-living/tobacco-use/health-risks-e-cigarettes-smokeless-tobacco-and-waterpipes

 

Oral healthcare and the cancer patient

Sandy Springs Dentist – A higher standard through healthcare well planned

Oral CancerManagement of a patient being treated for cancer, particularly where the cancer treatment is located near the head and neck should involve your oral healthcare provider, i.e. your dentist.  Unfortunately, there are very few published studies or guidelines on how to manage the cancer patient during therapy.  Accordingly, there is considerable variation across the medical community relative to specific non-medicated approaches to baseline oral care.

Oral-facial complications are common after radiotherapy to the head and neck, and after chemo-therapy for malignant diseases. Oral Mucositis, also called stomatitis is the most frequent and debilitating complication of cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy, occurring in about 40% of patients. Oral mucositis is inflammation of the mucosa of the mouth which ranges from redness to severe ulceration. Symptoms of mucositis vary from pain and discomfort to an inability to tolerate food or fluids.[1]

All patients at risk should receive a standardized oral care regime as an ongoing component of their cancer therapy.  Additional interventions may include dental brushing with toothpaste, dental flossing, ice chips, and sodium bicarbonate rinses. These regimens typically include dental work to eliminate caries and existing gum disease before beginning cancer treatment, followed by thorough and frequent cleaning of the oral cavity with a variety of products, some form of pain relief, anti-inflammatory treatment as required and aggressive antimicrobial treatment for any new mouth infections.[2] Patient compliance with these agents can be maximized by comprehensive overseeing by the oral healthcare professional.

Get the facts, ask the Right Smile Center.  If we can be of assistance, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC.

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

[1] http://oralcancerfoundation.org/dental/pdf/mucositis.pdf

[2] Ibid.