Healthy smile, healthy you! | Sandy Springs Dentist

sandy springs chamblee dentist near me
Health smile, healthy you!

Regular dental visits can tell a dentist a lot about your overall health.  Recent research indicates that your oral health is a reflection of your global health.  Meaning, if your mouth is healthy, chances are your overall health is also healthy.  Those with poor oral health, this may be sending signals of other health issues.

Additionally, a healthy smile may actually prevent certain diseases from occurring, such as gum precipitated heart infections.  As of late, a lot of orthopedic surgeons are requesting a blessing from your dentist before they operate.  According to the American Academy of Periodontology, there is a relationship between gum disease and health complications such as a stroke and heart disease.[1]   Women, in particular with gum disease  show higher incidences of pre-term, low birth-weight babies.

Recent studies have shown that there are microbiologic and immunological findings that  support the association.  These studies indicate that periodontal infection can lead to placental-fetal exposure and, when coupled with a fetal inflammatory response, can lead to preterm delivery.[2]

Further research shows that more than 80 percent of all systemic diseases have oral manifestations, including swollen gums, mouth ulcers, dry mouth and/or excessive gum problems. Such systemic diseases include:

  • diabetes
  • leukemia
  • cancer
  • heart disease
  • kidney disease

Since most people have regular oral examinations their dentist may be the first line of defense to diagnose a health problem in its early stages.

Failing to take care of your teeth and can actually lead to other health problems, including:

  • Oral and facial pain. According to the Office of the Surgeon General, this pain may be largely due to infections of the gums that support the teeth and can lead to tooth loss. Gingivitis, an early stage of gum disease, and advanced gum disease affect more than 75 percent of the U.S. population.
  • Problems with the heart and other major organs. Mouth infections can affect major organs. For example, the heart and heart valves can become inflamed by bacterial endocarditis, a condition that affects people with heart disease or anyone with damaged heart tissue.
  • Oral cancer. Poor oral care can contribute to oral cancer, which now takes more lives annually than cervical or skin cancer.
  • Digestion problems. Digestion begins with physical and chemical processes in the mouth, and problems here can lead to intestinal failure, irritable bowel syndrome and other digestion disorders.

Seeing a dentist regularly keeps your mouth healthy and allows your dentist opportunities to examine developments that may point to other health issues.  As always, if you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact our office in Sandy Springs for a consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DME

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

[1]  “Gum Disease Links to Heart Disease and Stroke.” American Academy of Periodontology, May 8, 2008. www.perio.org/consumer/mbc.heart.htm

[2] JADA, 2006, Exploring the relationship between periodontal disease and pregnancy complications

Yiorgos A. Bobetsis, DDS, PhD, Silvana P. Barros, DDS, PhD and Steven Offenbacher, DDS, PhD, MMSc

Older patients have special dental needs

elderly-patients-2Mouths, like other body parts, are affected by years and by genes. Older Americans are fast becoming the largest segment of our population and at the same time suffer disproportionately from oral diseases. The problem particularly acute for individuals in long term care facilities.  We say a patient yesterday in our Sandy Springs office and had to pull another tooth.  Our dilemma is how to get the facilities to do a better job.  The patient is usually on multiple medications and common side effects of normally reduce salivary flow.[1]   This adversely affects their quality of life, the ability to chew, and leads to significant problems of the teeth and their supporting structures.

It pains us to see this happen.  Quite honestly, a lot of senior care patients suffer from neglect, which results in terrible oral health.  These elderly patients have difficulty performing routine oral hygiene procedures because of physical limitations, such as Parkinson’s or rheumatoid arthritis or in the worst case, Alzheimer’s.  The further compounding of these issues is neglect.

They shouldn’t have to.  And it pains us to see it happening.

Together, you two can make an unbeatable team!  We can lead the horse to water but the elderly need better care between dental visits.

Specializing in Geriatric Patients, Dr. Scheinfeld was trained in prosthodontics at Emory University School of Dentistry. Dr. Oland and Dr. ZoAnna Scheinfeld devote a considerable amount of time actually traveling to nursing homes to treat the elderly.  If we can be of help to your and parents, please call us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

Hanna Orland, DMD

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

[1] Fox PC, Eversole LR. Diseases of the salivary glands. In: Silverman S, Eversole LR, Truelove EL, eds. Essentials of Oral Medicine. Ontario, Canada: BC Decker; 2002:260–276.

 

Dunwoody Dentist: Some Perceptions Never Change

Dunwoody Dentist near me - painlessIt seems like no matter how far we have come in the world of modern dentistry the perception of the dentist has not changed much since the days of the old west where the barber put his foot in your chest and yanked out your tooth.  Research by the British Dental Health Foundation suggests that visiting the dentist makes people more nervous than snakes or spiders.[1]The research echoes a March 2011, Adult Dental Health Survey which revealed half of adults – especially women – were classified as having moderate to extreme dental anxiety.[2]

In a survey of 1004 people, the Foundation found what made them most nervous from a list including heights, flying, injections, doctors, snakes, spiders, going to hospital or visiting the dentist was visiting the dentist.[3] Over one in five people ranked visiting their dentist as the thing that made them most nervous – more than any other category.

Overall, statistically:

 1. Heights topped the poll of biggest fears

2. Closely followed by visiting the dentist

3. Going to the hospital

4. Snakes were rated fourth

5. Spiders came fifth.

In comparison to Physicians, Dentists struggle more. The Foundation discovered that nearly 10 times as many people (22 per cent) were made most nervous by their dentist, as compared to their physician (two per cent). The Adult Dental Health Survey points to two dental treatments in particular as the main cause of these nerves: three out of ten (30 per cent) adults said that having a tooth drilled would make them very or extremely anxious. A similar number (28 per cent) of people reported equivalent levels of anxiety about having a local anesthetic injection.

Dr Nigel Carter, Chief Executive of the British Dental Health Foundation, said: “Everyone in the profession knows that dental anxiety is a major barrier for many people to visit their dentist.”  What may prove concerning is just how poorly the dental profession rates in comparison to doctors. The comparison with snakes and spiders may appear frivolous, but it does suggest dentists still have a lot of work to do to build public confidence.  Unfortunately, in modern dentistry the gap between reality and perception is the Grand Canyon, because there really is no modern reason to fear your dentist.  All of the old procedures are now performed with great comfort and no pain to patient.

 Dr. Novy Scheinfeld is a trained prosthodontist with her post-graduate degrees from Emory University School of Dentistry.  She was recently chosen as one of America’s Top Dentists for 2011.
 

NovyScheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

 

Related articles


[1]http://www.rdsurgery.co.uk

 [2] Adult Dental Health Survey 2009, the Health and Social Care Information Centre.

Published March 2011.

 [3] British Dental Health Foundation. Sample Size: 1004.

Women and Oral Health

mature women smiling3As a woman, you know that your health needs are unique, including your oral health needs. And because your needs are unique, you need to take extra care of yourself.  The hormonal fluctuations throughout a woman’s life affect many tissues, including gum tissue.  These fluctuations occur when you mature and change, as you do during puberty or menopause, or other times when you have special health needs, particularly during menstruation and pregnancy.

According to the Journal of Periodontology[1] at least 23 percent of women between the ages 30 to 54 have periodontitis.[2]  And, 44 percent of women ages 55 to 90 who still have their teeth have periodontitis.  Yet many women do not realize they have it until it reaches an advanced state, which is why regular hygiene check-ups are so important.

What Should You Do?

See us for cleaning at least twice a year – you need to monitor your oral health.

Keep us informed about any medications you are taking and any changes in your health history.

Brush and floss properly every day.  Review your techniques with a dental professional.

If there any questions that you might have, please call us to discuss them.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

[1] January 1999 issue of the Journal of Periodontology

[2] Periodontitis is an advanced state of periodontal disease in which there is active destruction of the periodontal supporting tissues.

Mouthwash and Oral Cancer

Top Sandy Springs dentist near meThere appears to be controversy over whether mouthwash containing alcohol may be related to oral cancer that arises out the studies that show a link between oral cancer and the consumption of alcohol.  By extension, if drinking alcohol may cause cancer than so should alcohol based mouthwash. The problem is there are no conclusive studies and insufficient evidence to alter the ADA’s approval of mouthwash containing alcohol as an effective method for the prevention and reduction of gingivitis and plaque.

What we know is that none of the criteria for causality have been fulfilled by the published studies so far.  The International Agency for Research on Cancer, an extension of the World Health Organization, now identifies the consumption of ethanol in alcoholic beverages as a carcinogenic risk.[1] Alcohol abuse is associated with cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx and esophagus. Ibid.  However, the reason for this association is not fully understood.[2]

Because of the conflicting studies and endorsements we could advise you to keep using alcohol formulated mouth rinses.  But if you are concerned and wish to stay on the safe side of the debate, there are non-alcohol based mouth rinses available that appear to be effective in the prevention of gingivitis and plaque.

Our job is to try and educate you on the contemporary issues we face in addressing your oral health and if there are any questions you would like to pose, please feel free to contact us for a free consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

[1] International Agency for Research on Cancer. IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Volume 96. Alcoholic beverage consumption and ethyl carbamate (urethane). Lyon, France: 6-13 February 2007.

[2] Lachenmeier DW. Safety evaluation of topical applications of ethanol on the skin and inside the oral cavity. J Occup Med Toxicol 2008;3:26.

Profits Trump Care in Corporate Dentistry

Hygiene examA corporation exists to make money—as much as possible.   A dental practice, however, exists to provide the best evidence-based healthcare services to its patients.  Making as much money as possible should never become the primary goal of a dental practice, as it is for a corporation. As our CEO once said, “Give the best care you can to each and every patient, and the money will take care of itself.” Making money is a tangential benefit—albeit an important one—that keeps food on the table and the doors open.

How, then, does a dental corporation function? Can corporations be entrusted to hire dentists and manage dental practices? How has managed care worked with physicians?  The answer is volume—get as many patients in for as much treatment in as short a time as possible.  Is that what you really want in your healthcare provider?

We believe in-network corporate dentistry provides substandard care.  That would keep us awake at night.  Contact us for your second opinion.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Profits Drive Corporate Dentistry | Sandy Springs Dentist OP-ED

Sandy Springs dentist near meWhen PBS’s Frontline turned its focus to corporate dental chain Aspen Dental, it should come as no surprise that they found major potential problems with the way the practices were being run.  One of the major concerns about corporate dentistry is that they recommend unnecessary tooth extractions just because it’s a good way to maximize profits.  We see it in patients who leave for insurance reasons and then come back because they received an enormous amount of treatment planning at an in-network corporate dental practice.

According to one dentist on Frontline, “They spend most of their time trying to talk people out of their teeth.”  Generally, when we are asked for a second opinion we find a lot of unnecessary treatment proposed.

New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman launched an investigation of the chain in 2013 after an investigative report by FRONTLINE. The news report found that Aspen Dental, which targets low-income patients, pressured dentists to increase revenue by using high-pressure sales techniques. Many patients complained of being overcharged or given unnecessary treatments.

The attorney general investigation reached the same conclusions and fined Aspen Dental $450,000.00.  One internal Aspen Dental document released by the attorney general showed the company complaining that hygienists were falling short of their revenue targets and instructing them to sell more products and services to patients.

In our Sandy Springs and Chamblee offices we are proud of our ethics and expertise, and invite you to see us for both your oral and cosmetic health care.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

Howard Abrahams, DDS

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Corporate Dentistry and Overtreatment

Chamblee Dentist Hanna OrlandAllegations of overtreatment take many different forms, but the majority of such allegations imply an improper motive on the part of in-network dental practices.  Suggesting or providing treatment which is not necessary, often not justifiable, appears to be linked to corporate dental practices that desire to generate additional fees.  Often we have someone leave our practice due to the failure of their dental insurance, only to come back when the corporate, in-network practice is over prescribing treatment.

Over-prescribing of dental treatment can of course occur in any clinical setting, but when it takes place in ‘private’ corporate practices it often becomes difficult to separate the sometimes subjective clinical judgments as to what is and is not necessary, from the financial motives to generate target income. This introduces an uncomfortable dimension to any clinical considerations.

There is considerable anecdotal evidence to suggest that in-network practices tend to recommend or provide more treatment when seeing a new patient for the first time, than they might do if they encountered an existing patient, with exactly the same oral condition under their care for many years.  The new in-network patient appears to present many ‘golden’ opportunities for the first visit.

Unfortunately, in the oral healthcare setting post 2008 recession, this imbalance has fundamental consequences for the patient’s ability to decide for themselves whether or not to proceed with any particular treatment that has been suggested to them.  It’s like taking your car to the auto mechanic.  The patient lacks the expertise to discern whether he/she is being taken for a ride.

In our Sandy Springs and Chamblee offices we pride ourselves of defining treatment that’s in the best interest despite the pressures on the current insurance system.  And we always present alternatives that might be available.  We been around a long time and has more than a 1000 five star reviews.  Call us for treatment in your best interest.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

The Mercury Filling Controversy

Amalgam fillingWhenever I hear a patient in our Sandy Springs office ask about mercury fillings, I wonder why this question refuses to go away.  For decades, mercury fillings have been considered the primary restorative material for the ones in the back because of their long time success.  After enormous amounts of study, the World Health Organization, the FDI World Dental Federation, and the American Dental Association continue to endorse the use of amalgam to restore teeth.   Yet it continues to be demonized by the public, in particular in urban legends over the internet.

As a result the trend is towards the diminished use of mercury fillings and the increased use of composite resins to restore posterior teeth.  One of our consultants, Tom Limoli of Limoli and Associates notes that US third-party payment data reflects that 65% of direct posterior restorations last year were resin-based composite, while 35% were amalgam.  So regardless of the empirical evidence that refutes these concerns, the patient pool is demanding composite restorations.

While amalgam has been the material of choice for decades and still remains the primary source of teaching in dental schools today, it appears to be trending away the future.  Given the patient demand for composite restorations, we do a lot more composite fillings than in the past. It creates an interesting dilemma for dentists today, when we know that amalgam is the better choice for the restoration, but the popular demand or the path of least resistance is a composite restoration.  This disconnect creates some interesting food for thought.[1]  Please give us a call if we can help you.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

[1] Additional sources of information came from Gordon J. Christensen, DDS, James F. Simon, DDS, and Howard E. Strassler, DMD. Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry, July/August, 2011.