Your Oral Health Care Plan – Atlanta Dentist

I read this on Webmd and thought it was a very practical approach to dental care:

Tooth paste and bruch
Every plan involves brushing

Your Oral Health Care Plan

Good oral health involves more than just brushing.  Here’s what you should consider:

1. Understand your own oral health needs.

Talk with your dentist or hygienist about any special conditions in your mouth and any ways in which your medical/health conditions affect your teeth and oral health. For example, cancer treatments, pregnancy, heart diseases, diabetes, dentures, or braces can all impact your oral health and may necessitate a change in the care of your mouth. Be sure to tell your dentist if you have experienced a change in your general health or in any medications you are taking since your last visit.

2. Develop, then follow, a daily oral health routine.

Based on discussions with your dentist, considering your unique general health and oral health situations, develop an oral health routine that is easy to follow on a daily basis. For example, people with special conditions – such as pregnancy, diabetes and other underlying diseases, orthodontic appliances – may require additional instruction and perhaps treatments to keep their mouth healthy. Make sure you understand the additional care and/or treatment that is needed, commit to the extra tasks, and work them into your daily health routine.

3. Use fluoride.

Children and adults benefit from fluoride use. Fluoride strengthens developing teeth in children and prevents tooth decay in both children and adults.  Fluoride levels in tap water may not be high enough without supplementation to prevent tooth decay. Contact your water utility to determine the level for your area. Talk with your dentist about your fluoride needs. Ask if fluoride supplements or a higher strength, prescription-only fluoride product is necessary for you.

4. Brush and floss daily.

Brush your teeth at least twice a day (morning and before bed time) and floss at least once a day. Better still would be to brush after every meal or snack.

5. Eat a balanced diet and limit snacking.

Eat a variety of foods and cut down on sugar. These foods produce the most acids in the mouth, which begin the decay process. If you must snack, brush your teeth afterwards or chew sugarless gum.

6. If you use tobacco products, quit.

Smoking cigarettes or using smokeless tobacco products increases your risk of oral cancer and cancers of the larynx, pharynx and esophagus; gum disease; as well as causes bad breath, tooth discoloration, and contributes to other oral and general health problems.

7. Examine your mouth regularly.

Become familiar with the appearance of your own mouth and teeth through frequent examination. This way you will be able to catch any changes at an early stage and have these changes examined by a dentist. Look for the development of any spots, lesions, cuts, swellings, or growths on your gums, tongue, cheeks, inside of your lips, and floor and roof of your mouth. Examine your teeth for any signs of chipping or cracking, discoloration, and looseness. If you experience a change in your bite or develop pain, call your dentist as soon as possible. An oral examination is particularly important to conduct if you are a tobacco user, since you are at an increased risk of developing oral cancer.

8. Visit your dentist regularly.

The standard recommendation is to visit your dentist twice a year for check-ups and cleanings. Talk with your dentist about the frequency that is best for you considering your oral health situation.  Your insurance company never attended dental school.

9. Develop a partnership with your dentist.

Don’t be afraid to ask your dentist for more information if you don’t understand a treatment or procedure. You should be able to have a free and frank discussion with your dentist about the following types of issues:

  • What are the treatment options for a particular dental condition?
  • How do these options differ in cost and in their durability?
  • Do all the options solve the problem? What are the benefits and drawbacks of each option?
  • Of the dental treatments being recommended, which are absolutely necessary, which are less urgent, which are elective, and which are merely cosmetic?
  • What are the consequences of delaying treatment?
  • How much will the treatment cost?
  • When is payment due?
  • What method of payment does your dentist expect?
  • Do you have a clear understanding of all fees and methods and schedules of payment?

If we can help please give us a call or send us an email.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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4 thoughts on “Your Oral Health Care Plan – Atlanta Dentist

  1. I like your word ‘Don’t be afraid to ask your dentist for more information if you don’t understand a treatment or procedure’.
    Most of the patients get afraid of asking about treatment procedure to their dentist. But this should not be the case. Patients should be aware of the whole treatment procedure.

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