Dentist Sandy Springs: Who Moved My Cheese?

cheeseOr ‘ate my cheese’, because dairy products may be good for your oral health.  A new study suggests that consuming cheese products may help protect your teeth against cavities.  So not only do you get strong bones, you get healthy teeth.[1]

The study sampled 68 patients ranging in age from 12 to 15 and found a higher pH level in those that consumed cheese, which may have induced a higher saliva level from the chewing, suggesting that cheese has anti-cavity properties.  Additionally, various compounds found in cheese may adhere to tooth enamel and further help teeth from acid (found in wine for instance).

If we can be of help or answer your questions, please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

 


[1] General Dentistry, Journal of Academy of General Dentistry, May/June 2013.

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Dentist Alpharetta: Crohn’s Disease

CrohnsStem cells found in gum tissue may fight inflammatory disease, which would be great news for IBD patients.[1]  Apparently, they have a much less inflammatory reaction and heal much faster when compared to skin stem cells.  When stem cells from the gum tissue were transplanted into mice with dextrate sulfate sodium-induced colitis — an inflamed condition of the colon — the inflammation was significantly reduced.[2]  These stem cells have the ability to develop into different types of cells as well as affect the immune system, which poses wonderful hope for patients with Crohn’s disease.

In the meantime, research on the relationship between IBD and stem cells is still ongoing.  If we can be of assistance, give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

 


[1] University of Southern California (2013, August 5). Stem cells found in gum tissue can fight inflammatory disease. ScienceDaily. Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC study in the Journal of Dental Research.

[2] Ibid.