Dentist Brookhaven: Wisdom Teeth Pulled

brookhaven oral surgeon near meOur team can extract a wisdom tooth, also known as third molars.  But if it’s impacted or beyond our skill set, we refer out to one of our participating oral surgeons.  The procedure can be done in the dentist’s office and most of the time that is the case.  However, it is possible that you could have the surgery in the hospital, if you are having all your wisdom teeth pulled.  If the latter is the case, you may be at a higher risk for complications.  So in the oral surgeon’s judgment, the use of a hospital is for precautionary measures.  Patients with infections, their surgery will be delayed in order to avoid other health related complications.  There is empirical evidence of the link between periodontal disease and heart related issues.  Dental surgery may cause the periodontal bacteria in the mouth to enter the bloodstream and cause infections in other parts of your body.  Usually this can be cleared up by the prescription of antibiotics before and after surgery.

Wisdom teeth are usually the last teeth to erupt in your mouth and can cause crowding or food pockets which lead to undesired gum infections.  About 35% of the population never develops wisdom teeth at all.[1]  For those that do, it is often recommended that people from the ages 17 to 25[2] will need to have this extraction, but we judge each patient on a case by case basis.  If your wisdom teeth are not causing any noticeable problems, then it may be difficult to determine whether to have them removed to prevent future problems.[3]  It is quite possible that you may never have any problems.  But is also possible that they fail to erupt and cause problems like cysts, crowding or decay or hygiene issues.[4]

As a part of the procedure, the tooth and the surrounding tissue are numbed with a local anesthetic prior to having the extraction.  Some people prefer to use nitrous oxide (otherwise known as “laughing gas”).  In some cases, there is the use of a mild sedation, where the patient is still conscious but truly unaware of the procedure.  It is even possible that you receive general anesthesia.  If you decide to use the nitrous or sedation dentistry then you will need someone drive you home from the procedure.  The recovery time is usually 12 to 24 hours of rest, but usually no more than 48 hours.

One of the more interesting or notable post procedure recommendations is not to use a straw to drink.  The sucking through the straw may dislodge the blood clot in the socket area and delay the healing process.

If you feel you are a candidate for wisdom teeth removal, or we can be of service, please feel free to contact us for a complimentary consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com


[2]http://www.aaoms.org/wisdom_teeth.php, Wisdom Teeth, American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Retrieved 2011-26-08. “This generally occurs between the ages of 17 and 25”.

[3] The Right Smile Center doesn’t push to have them extracted, we recommend you read up on the subject at http://www.aaoms.org/wisdom_teeth.php, to help make the final decision.   Please remember that an oral surgeon is going to have a bias towards removal.

[4] Pediatric Dentistry: Infancy Through Adolescence, 4th Edition

 

Brookhaven, GA: Dentist: Do Children Grind Their Teeth?

brookhaven dentist near meThe problem of bruxism, otherwise known as teeth grinding, is not limited to adults.  According WebMD, approximately 15% to 33% of children grind their teeth. Children who grind their teeth tend to do so at two peak times in their lives – (1) when their baby teeth emerge and (2) when their permanent teeth come in.[1]  Some of this potential grinding is protected or goes unnoticed because of thumb sucking, which can cause a different set of problems.   However, most children who do not suck their thumbs while sleeping lose the teeth grinding habit shortly after these two sets of teeth have come in more fully.

While it is more common for children grinding their teeth to do it during sleep rather than during waking hours, it has not been determined exactly why children grind their teeth.  There are several theories which include improperly aligned teeth or irregular contact between upper and lower teeth, illnesses and other medical conditions (such as nutritional deficiencies, pinworm, allergies, endocrine disorders), and psychological factors including anxiety and stress, and all of which appear to be unsubstantiated theory.

The main reason there has been very little study on children grinding their baby teeth is that it rarely results in problems.  However, teeth grinding can cause jaw pain, headaches, wear on the teeth, and TMD.[2]  Consult your dentist if your child’s teeth look worn or if your child complains of tooth sensitivity or pain.

Should teeth grinding result in a real problem for your child, here are some specific tips to help stop teeth grinding:[3]

  1. Where possible, decrease your child’s stress, especially just before bedtime.
  2. Try massage and stretching exercises to relax the muscles.
  3. Make sure your child’s diet includes plenty of water. There is some thought that dehydration may be linked to teeth grinding.
  4. Ask your dentist to monitor your child’s teeth if he or she is a grinder.  Possibly consult a pedodontist (children’s dentist) and pediatrician if it becomes apparent that damage is occurring.

No intervention is usually required with preschool-age children. However, older children may need temporary crowns or other methods, such as a night guard, to prevent the grinding in their sleep.

Dr. Scheinfeld is an Emory trained prosthodontist specializing in mandibular form and function. Call us for a consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

Info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

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[1] WebMD, Teeth Grinding (Bruxism) July 5, 2011

[3] WebMD, Teeth Grinding (Bruxism) July 5, 2011