Dentist Sandy Springs: Oral Health and Alheimer’s

Sandy Springs dentist near meWhat does the health of your mouth have to do with your overall health? In a word, plenty. A look inside or a swab of saliva can tell your doctor volumes about what’s going on inside your body.

Researchers are also discovering new reasons to brush and floss. A healthy mouth may help you ward off medical disorders. The flip side? An unhealthy mouth, especially if you have gum disease, may increase your risk of serious health problems such as heart attack, stroke, poorly controlled diabetes, preterm labor, and now, Alzheimer’s.

Your mouth is a window into what’s going on in the rest of your body, often serving as a helpful vantage point for detecting the early signs and symptoms of systemic disease — a disease that affects or pertains to your entire body, not just one of its parts. Systemic conditions such as AIDS or diabetes, for example, often first become apparent as mouth lesions or other oral problems. In fact, according to the Academy of General Dentistry, more than 90 percent of all systemic diseases produce oral signs and symptoms.

If you don’t brush and floss regularly to keep your teeth clean, plaque can build up along your gumline, creating an environment for additional bacteria to accumulate in the space between your gums and your teeth. This gum infection is known as gingivitis. Left unchecked, gingivitis can lead to a more serious gum infection, Alzheimer’s. Now, more than ever, research is indicating that sustained oral health may lead to a prevention of Alzheimer’s disease.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Sandy Springs Dentist: Gum Disease May Lead to Alzheimer’s

Sandy Springs dentist near meIn a new study, researchers have found that a bacterium largely responsible for gum disease also contributes to the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

A bacterium involved in gum disease boosts Alzheimer’s toxicity.

According to data from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, 8.52 percent of adults between 20 and 64 years of age in the United States have periodontitis (gum disease).

Gum disease is a widespread problem that can lead to more negative outcomes, from tooth loss to an increased risk of cancer.

Now, emerging evidence suggests that one of the bacteria involved in periodontitis could also contribute to the accumulation of toxic proteins in the brain, which scientists have associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

These findings have emerged from a new study in mice that researchers from Cortexyme, Inc., a pharmaceutical company that aims to develop new therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease, have conducted.

The results of the research — whose lead author is Dr. Stephen Dominy, Cortexyme co-founder — appear in the journal Science Advances.

Now more than ever, your maintaining your oral health may be the key to your healthy life.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Sandy Springs Dentist: Older Patient’s Special Needs

Sandy Springs dentist near meMouths, like people, are affected by years as well as by genes. If you’re over 60, your oral chemistry is changing—and thorough examinations of gums and salivary glands can be a lifesaving early detector of oral cancer and now, possibly Alzheimer’s.

Patients over 55 develop twice as many cavities as children do. Many times that’s because medications seniors take reduce saliva flow and dry the mouth—an open invitation for tooth decay and periodontal disease.

What should you expect from a visit to your dental hygienist? Along with your dental cleaning you may need professional scaling and root planing to remove harmful plaque and calculus deposits. He or she may also record the depths of your periodontal pockets (that space between your teeth and gums where decay and periodontal disease flourish).

Keeping track of you is a key part of the hygienist’s job. It includes keeping your dental chart and health history current, making preliminary oral inspections, and creating tooth impressions.

We are educators—someone who can teach you preventive dentistry skills—brushing and flossing techniques that make for healthy, trouble-free gums and teeth. Together, we can make an unbeatable team!

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Scheinfeld, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Sandy Springs Dentist: Alzheimer’s and Gum Disease

Sandy Springs dentist near meIn recent years, a growing number of scientific studies have backed an alarming hypothesis: Alzheimer’s disease isn’t just a disease, it’s an infection.  Now, scientists are saying they’ve got one of the most definitive leads yet for a bacterial culprit behind Alzheimer’s, and it comes from a somewhat unexpected quarter: gum disease.

In a new paper led by senior author Jan Potempa, a microbiologist from the University of Louisville, researchers report the discovery of Porphyromonas gingivalis – the pathogen behind chronic periodontitis (aka gum disease) – in the brains of deceased Alzheimer’s patients.

“Now, for the first time, we have solid evidence connecting the intracellular, Gram-negative pathogen, P. gingivalis, and Alzheimer’s pathogenesis.”

In addition, the team identified toxic enzymes called gingipains secreted by the bacteria in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, which correlated with two separate markers of the disease: the tau protein and a protein tag called ubiquitin.

The fact that low levels of gingipains were evident even in people who were never diagnosed with Alzheimer’s could be a smoking gun – suggesting they might have developed the condition if they had lived longer.

According to the American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA), approximately 75% of American adults were suffering from various forms of gum diseases in 2008.” If the outcome of these ongoing trials prove true, there is even greater reason to see us for your oral hygiene and testing.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Note:  The findings are reported in Science Advances.

Sandy Springs Dentist: Prevent Cavities in Kids

Sandy Springs dentist near meKids and cavities seem to go hand in hand. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 28 percent of children ages 2 through 5 have at least one dental cavity, compared to 24 percent a decade ago.

Although 4 percent may not seem like a lot, that increase represents thousands and thousands of children and cavities — as well as a trend in the opposite direction of the last 40 years, when tooth decay was on a gradual decline.

So if you have children and cavities are a concern, here are six easy ways to reduce the risk:

  1. Avoid giving your baby juice or formula at night. The sugar in juice and formula causes the bacteria in the mouth to produce the acids that cause baby bottle tooth decay. Use fluoridated water instead.
  2. Choose low-fat foods from the basic food groups. Raw fruits and vegetables, nuts, whole-grain breads and low-fat dairy products are great for your child’s overall health and their dental health!
  3. If you must, give sweets only as a dessert. If your child must have sweets, limit it to dessert or following a main meal. Late-night snacking and frequent snacking are a major culprit of cavities in children.
  4. Invest in a water filter. Instead of spending extra on bottled water, invest in a filter for your sink, or a filtered water pitcher. Fluoridated tap water is an excellent resource to help the battle between children and cavities.
  5. Don’t share cups or utensils. Cavities are contagious. So if you have them, you can pass them onto your child by sharing cups and utensils.
  6. If you smoke, stop. The University of Rochester’s Strong Children’s Research Center has discovered a link between smoking, children and cavities. Results from a study show that children of parents who smoke are more likely to develop cavities.

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Sandy Spring: Dental Emergency!

Emergency dentist near meA dental emergency is always a stressful situation, but it can become absolutely nerve-racking when your dentist is out of the office. Whether it’s late Saturday night and your dentist won’t be back in until Monday, or if your dentist is out of the country on 2-week vacation, a dental emergency can be difficult to manage on your own. There are some basic things that you can do to prevent or cope with dental emergencies when they occur.

 The best way to handle a potential dental emergency is to avoid it in the first place. The most common dental emergency is pain or swelling from an infected tooth. In most cases, this does not happen suddenly, as in overnight. Typically, a person has some degree of pain or discomfort for several days or even longer before they are in severe pain and in need of emergency dental care. The best advice is to visit the dentist at the first sign of any discomfort in the teeth or gums.

 If a dental emergency does occur when your dentist is unavailable, there are several things that you can do. Pain in the teeth or gums can often be effectively handled with over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen (Advil®), naproxen (Aleve®), or acetaminophen (Tylenol®), to be taken as directed. Rinsing with warm salt water (a teaspoon of salt in eight ounces of water) can help temporarily relieve puffy or swollen cheeks and gums. Some-store bought products like Orajel® can also be effective in relieving minor soreness of the gums. If you have a broken tooth, a piece of wax or even some soft chewing gum can cover a sharp edge until you can get to the dentist.

 We make great efforts to be available for advice if a dental emergency occurs. Thanks to cell phones and answering services, patients can often reach our dentist after office hours. This gives the dentist the ability to contact the pharmacy for antibiotics and pain medication should they feel you need them. If our dentists are going to be out of the office for more than a few days, we have another dentist available to treat any dental emergencies that may occur.

 Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Chamblee Dentist: Oral Health Guidelines for Pregnant Women

Chamblee Dentist near meWhy is oral health care important during pregnancy? Mothers with gum disease have a higher instance of preterm birth, a potentially serious pregnancy complication that may cause health concerns for their infant, typically due to a low birth weight.

Pregnancy gingivitis is a common form of gum disease known to develop in almost half of all pregnant women likely due to the change in hormones. With proper precautions, pregnancy gingivitis generally ends shortly after the birth of the child, although it should be monitored by a dentist periodically during pregnancy in order to prevent this form of gingivitis from progressing into more serious periodontitis, an advanced and irreversible form of gum disease that has been linked with preterm birth.

Pregnant mothers with periodontal disease are seven times more likely to go into preterm labor. Prostaglandin, a chemical found in oral bacteria, may induce labor. Also, high levels of prostaglandin has been found in the mouths of women with severe cases of periodontal disease.

The following guidelines were developed by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAP) in response to the growing concern surrounding oral health during pregnancy:

  • Oral Health Education – Counseling and early intervention by healthcare providers such as physicians, nurses, and dentists to provide expectant mothers with the tools and resources necessary to understand the importance of oral health care during pregnancy.
  • Oral Hygiene – Removing the bacterial plaque, which researchers have connected to preterm birth and low birth-weight babies, is essential. Using the correct brushing and flossing methods greatly increase the amount of plaque that is removed from the teeth and gums.
  • Fluoride – The American Dental Association recommends the use of toothpaste with fluoride by persons over the age of six. Echoing their sentiment, the AAP oral health guidelines advise the continued use of fluoridated toothpaste during pregnancy, and recommends the use of an over-the-counter alcohol-free fluoride rinse to help reduce the amount of plaque in the mouth.
  • Nutrition – Educating expectant mothers about proper diet and nutrition during pregnancy will limit unnecessary sugar intake and in turn, prevent plaque buildup.
  • Treating Existing Tooth Decay – Expectant mothers are encouraged to have existing tooth decay treated during their pregnancy, which experts believe is a completely safe practice during pregnancy. Restoring decayed teeth will help achieve oral health by removing the bacteria associated with tooth decay.
  • Transmission of Bacteria – Expectant mothers are discouraged from sharing food and utensils in order to prevent the transmission of the bacteria known to cause tooth decay.
  • Use of Xylitol Gum – Expectant mothers are encouraged to chew xylitol gum (four times a day) as research suggests that chewing this gum may decrease the rate of tooth decay in children.

And ALWAYS Talk to Our Dentist!

If you are pregnant or are considering pregnancy, discuss any concerns you may have with our dentist.
Women who are thinking about becoming pregnant may want to consider their oral health before becoming pregnant. As research suggests, treating existing gum disease in pregnant women does not reduce the instance of preterm birth. Despite this fact, experts insist that regular oral health care should continue throughout pregnancy.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

and

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com