Dental Implants? See our Prosthodontist

Prosthodontist = ADA cosmetic dentist

Dentist near meProsthodontists are expert dentists with a post graduate ADA accredited degree, where function and aesthetics are melded into the final result. They are the quarterbacks of dental implants.

There are a lot of people who just weren’t born with beautiful smiles or for other reasons ended up with damaged teeth.  Some inherited stains from medicines their parents took prior to child birth, while others developed discolorations through the years making their appearance unattractive whenever they open to talk or smile.

Our trained prosthodontist specializes in the cosmetic restorations that provide methods, procedures and plans which ultimately improve your personality as much as it improves your mouth. In the past there had been an extensive time period involved in replacing missing teeth through dental implants.  And with our in-house implant team, you can get done all under one roof by one of Dr. Scheinfeld’s two daughters, Dr. Zoey Scheinfeld and Dr. Hanna Orland.

As a result of our training and experience with difficult cases, modern techniques take much less time in the beautification of the teeth as compared to older ordinary dentistry.

Finally, the combination of implant specialist rests comfortably within the purview of a prosthodontist’s training and expertise.  A comprehensive approach by a prosthodontist and our implantologists is the best way to get your inner confidence boosted and your personality improved.  If you truly want to start smiling with the right smile, see the ‘Pro’s.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Atlanta Dentist – Dr. Novy Scheinfeld, Prosthodontic Trained by Emory University (therightsmile.wordpress.com)

Oral Health Care of Our Aging Population

Geriatic dentist near me
Emerging Oral Health Concerns

Two important oral health care concerns emerging in the United States are disparities in the oral disease burden and the inability of certain segments of the population to access oral healthcare.[1]  Older Americans are becoming a larger segment of our population and suffer disproportionately from oral diseases, with the problem being particularly acute for individuals in long term care facilities.  Population projections for the United States indicate that the elderly will constitute an increasing percentage of the population as we proceed into the 21st century.

In 2001, the population of the United States was almost 278 million, and 12.6% of the population was 65 years of age or older. By 2015, the population increased to 312 million (3.08 million in 2010) and 14.7% of the population will be aged 65 years or older.  In 2030, which is within the practice lives of students currently enrolled in dental schools, the population will have increased to more than 350 million, and 20% of the population—1 of every 5 members of the US society—will be 65 years of age or older.  This large segment of our population is further compounded by the elderly population continuing to become increasingly diverse in terms of race, ethnicity,financial resources, and living conditions.[2]

The challenges faced by both the dental profession and the nation as a whole regarding provision of oral health care services to older adults are the subject of a recent report prepared by Oral Health America.[3]  All 50 states were surveyed to determine the level of Medicaid coverage for dental services, and the report concludes that financing oral health care services for the elderly will be a major challenge to our future.  Medicare does not provide any coverage for dental services, and only 1 of 5 Americans aged 75 years or older has any type of private dental insurance.  Given our current economic circumstances and resulting problems with Obamacare, it will be highly unlikely that our government resources will be adequate to gear up for the impending problem of oral health in the elderly.

They suffer from chronic disorders that either directly or indirectly affect oral health, including autoimmune disorders such as pemphigus and pemphigoid.[4] They generally require multiple medications, and common side effects of the more than 500 medications used to treat their overall health issues usually reduce salivary flow.[5]  The reduction in saliva adversely affects their quality of life, the ability to chew, and leads to significant problems of the teeth and their supporting structures.

The elderly consistently have difficulty performing routine oral hygiene procedures because of physical limitations, such as Parkinson’s or rheumatoid arthritis.   In addition, oral infection is now recognized as a risk factor for a number of systemic diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular diseases,diabetes, mellitus, and respiratory disorders.

Also,it is important to note that once people have lost their teeth and are using complete dentures, their oral health needs do not decrease.   Our jaws are not static and may continue to resorb over time.  In addditon to continued resorbtion of bone, improperly fitted dentures adversely affect chewing, leading to poor nutrition resulting in a shorter life expectancy.  Furthermore, those without teeth remain susceptible to oral cancer, mucosal diseases, and alterations in salivary gland function.

So for the vast majority of seniors residing in a long term care facility, financing of and access to oral health care services will be a formidable challenge. Given that medicare does not provide coverage for routine dental services including exams,and in the absence of private insurance or personal resources, a large portion of this group will not be able to afford any dental services whatsoever, let alone the most appropriate treatments.  Clearly, there must be a response to the increasing oral health concerns of the elderly who present with special needs, especially those who are home bound or living in long term  facilities burdened with other chronic disorders.

While effective preventive measures exist for younger populations (water fluoridation, dental sealants and parents), no preventive measures have been devised to address the expected increase in oral health needs of our aging population.  And the need for a coordinated effort to address their oral healthcare needs suggested by demographic trends and epidemiological data necessitates our planning for what might be considered a crisis or at least a paradigm shift in oral health care delivery for the elderly.

Seniors who have contributed so vitally to our society’s well-being, deserve to be treated with the best oral health care we have to offer.

Dr. Scheinfeld is a prosthodontist specializing in geriatric care. In addition, Dr. ZoAnna Scheinfeld and Dr. Hanna Orland have extensive nursing home experience.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com


[1] Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, Md: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; 2000.

[2] Wikipedia and 2010 Census.

[3] A State of Decay: The Oral Health of Older Americans. Chicago, Ill: Oral Health America; 2003:1–8.

[4] Stoopler ET, Sollecito TP, De Ross SS. Desquamative gingivitis: early presenting system of mucocutaneous disease. Quintessence Int.2003;34:582–586.

[5] Fox PC, Eversole LR. Diseases of the salivary glands. In: Silverman S, Eversole LR, Truelove EL, eds. Essentials of Oral Medicine. Ontario, Canada: BC Decker; 2002:260–276.

Geriatric Dentistry – Dentist Sandy Springs

geriatric dentist near me
Aging patients need special care for their oral health.

Two important oral health care concerns emerging in the United States:

  • Disparities in the oral disease burden, and
  • The inability of certain segments of the population to access oral health care.[1]

Older Americans are becoming a larger segment of our population and suffer disproportionately from oral diseases, with the problem being particularly acute for individuals in long term care facilities.

Not only do we see elderly patients in our Sandy Springs who are usually brought here by assisted living and nursing home facilities, but Dr. Orland visits numerous assisted living facilities outside of our immediate area.  By 2030, 1 of every 5 members in the US will be 65 years of age or older.  This large segment of our population is further compounded by the elderly population continuing to become increasingly diverse in terms of race, ethnicity, financial resources, and living conditions.[2]

The challenges faced by both the dental profession and the nation as a whole regarding provision of oral health care services to older adults needs a specialized and experienced team of dentists to address the issues.[3]  Medicare does not provide any coverage for dental services, and only 1 of 5 Americans aged 75 years or older has any type of private dental insurance and it will be highly unlikely that our government resources will be adequate to gear up for the impending problem of oral health for the elderly.

The elderly suffer from chronic disorders that can directly or indirectly affect oral health, including autoimmune disorders such as pemphigus and pemphigoid.[4] They generally require multiple medications, and common side effects of the more than 500 medications used to treat their overall health issues usually reduce salivary flow.[5]   And the reduction in saliva can adversely affect their quality of life, the ability to chew, and lead to significant problems of the teeth and their supporting structures.

In addition, particularly for geriatric patients, oral infection is now recognized as a risk factor for a number of systemic diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes, mellitus, and respiratory disorders.  Also, it is important to note that once people have lost their teeth and are using complete dentures, their oral health needs do not decrease.   Our jaws are not static and may continue to resorb over time.  Besides the continued resorption of bone, improperly fitted dentures can adversely affect chewing, leading to poor nutrition.  In addition, those without teeth remain susceptible to oral cancer, mucosal diseases, and alterations in salivary gland function.

While effective preventive measures exist for younger populations (water fluoridation, dental sealants and parents), no preventive measures have been devised to address the expected increase in oral health needs of the aging population.  We have developed the expertise to take a leadership role in the delivery of health care services to the seniors who have contributed so vitally to our society’s well-being and who deserve to be treated with the best oral health care we have to offer.

Dr. Scheinfeld, a prosthodontist and her daughters Dr. Orland and Dr. Z. Scheinfeld  specialize in geriatric care.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

Hanna Orland, DMD

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related Articles

[1] Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, Md: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; 2000.

[2] Wikipedia and 2010 Census.                                                                                

[3] A State of Decay: The Oral Health of Older Americans. Chicago, Ill: Oral Health America; 2003:1–8.

[4] Stoopler ET, Sollecito TP, De Ross SS. Desquamative gingivitis: early presenting system of mucocutaneous disease. Quintessence Int.2003;34:582–586.

[5] Fox PC, Eversole LR. Diseases of the salivary glands. In: Silverman S, Eversole LR, Truelove EL, eds. Essentials of Oral Medicine. Ontario, Canada: BC Decker; 2002:260–276.

Sandy Springs Dentist Dr. Howard Abrahams Joins The Right Smile Center

Sandy Springs Dentist near me

Sandy Springs’ Right Smile Center, a full service dental practice is excited to announce the addition of Howard Abrahams, DDS, as a new associate in the practice.

Dr. Abrahams brings the Right Smile Center decades of experience with a focus in restorative and oral care.

We are fortunate to have someone of Dr. Abrahams’s experience and training in our practice,” said Dr. Novy Scheinfeld.  “he brings a successful track record of great service with the added technical expertise that allows us to offer our patients broad coverage of unserved patients in the Sandy Springs area.

Dr. Abrahams grew up in New York’s Long Island and came to practice there after receiving his degree from Emory University’s School of Dentistry in 1980.  Married to native Atlantan Leslie, Dr. Abrahams currently resides in Sandy Springs. In addition to her dental degree, Dr. Abrahams has Bachelor’s degree from Emory University.  Throughout his career he has been active in various related charities and an accomplished musician in metro Atlanta.

The Right Smile Center is one of the largest active comprehensive dental practices in North Atlanta and has been trusted by thousands in metro Atlanta with 4 generations of patients.  If we can be of assistance in your oral health care needs please do not hesitate to call our office for a complementary consultation.

The Right Smile Center

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

404-404-843-1999

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

Howard Abrahams, DMD

The Right Smile Center is also located at:

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

Dentists Sandy Springs | Geriatric Dental Specialists

Where do I take my parents? To the Right Smile Center

special-needs-patient
Older Patients need expert care.

This our sweet spot and more and more, oral health care is playing a greater role in maintaining our aging population.  It has become vital to older patients as it relates to their overall global health.

And the last thing you want to do is take your parents and special needs patients to a corporate dental clinic.

While effective preventive measures exist for younger populations (water fluoridation, dental sealants and parents), no preventive measures have been devised to address the expected increase in oral health needs of the aging population. For oral care in the aging population you need a prosthodontist.

Oral health conditions affected 3.9 billion people, and untreated caries in permanent teeth was the most prevalent condition evaluated for the entire Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study (global prevalence of 35% for all ages combined).[1] Oral conditions combined accounted for 15 million disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) globally, implying an average health loss of 224 years per 100,000 population.[2]

DALYs due to oral conditions increased 20.8% between 1990 and 2010, mainly due to population growth and aging.[3]  In 2015, the US population increased to 320 million (3.08 million in 2010) and 14.7% of the population will be aged 65 years or older.  While effective preventive measures exist for younger populations (water fluoridation, dental sealants and parents), no preventive measures have been devised to address the expected increase in oral health needs of the aging population.

Our Right Smile team has taken a leadership role in the delivery of health care services to the seniors who deserve to be treated with the best oral health care we have to offer.  In our Sandy Springs officeDr. Scheinfeld is a prosthodontist specializing in geriatric care.  The Right Smile Team, including in-house periodontal treatment is designed to treat our aging population.  Call for an evaluation of your oral health care needs.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

[1] Wagner Marcenes, Queen Mary University, London,  IADR/AADR Journal of Dental Research

[2] http://www.biologytechnologyinstruments.com

[3] Ibid

50 Shades of Grey – Teeth Whitening – Sandy Springs

Sandy Springs Dentist near me
There is nothing like a bright smile.

Grey is definitely out.  So is yellow.  But, how much white is enough?  Well, no one really knows given the rush in recent years to have a whiter smile. And as it stands right now, teeth whitening is the number one cosmetic procedure performed in a dental office today.  But what about the oral health benefits?

What we know is there are additional benefits beyond bleaching your teeth.  So while attempting to achieve the right smile with a bright smile, whitening your teeth with 10% carbamide peroxide may actually help prevent cavities.[1]  The bacteria that causes cavities flourish when the pH of your mouth is slightly acidic, which happens to be a bi-product of eating or drinking.

However, according to Dr. Van Hayword of DCG Augusta a 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel in a custom tray can help elevate the pH, which helps fight decay.[2] There is also some evidence that the same regimen can help keep plaque from forming on the teeth, which may help prevent gum disease.

So while deciding how white is enough is a personal decision, weighing the costs and benefits of any cosmetic transformation probably should involve the input of your dental provider.  I encourage you to contact your dentist.  If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.[3]

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles


[1] Carbamide peroxide (10% and 15%) has been classified by the United States Food and Drug Association as Category 1, which means there is sufficient data to demonstrate that these agents are safe and effective for use in the oral cavity as oral antiseptic agents (Haywood, 1993; Dental Product Spotlight, 2001).

[2] Van B. Haywood, DMD, Department of Oral Rehabilitation, School of Dentistry, Dental College of Georgia

Warning signs of Periodontal Disease : Sandy Springs Dentist

Sandy Springs Dentist near meThe following are warning signs you might have periodontal disease:

  • Bad breath or bad taste that won’t go away
  • Red or swollen gums
  • Tender or bleeding gums
  • Painful chewing
  • Loose teeth
  • Sensitive teeth
  • Gums that have pulled away from your teeth
  • Any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • Any change in the fit of partial dentures

When you begin to notice these signs call and see your dentist.  Whether your gum disease is stopped, slowed, or gets worse depends a great deal on how well you care for your teeth and gums every day, from this point forward.

When considering any extensive dental treatment options, you should think about getting second opinion.  If we can be of assistance, please call for a free consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com