Dark spot on my tooth? Sandy Springs Dentist

Sandy Springs Dentist near me
Dark Spots on the tooth

It’s not that often, but occasionally we hear from patients regarding dark spots on teeth.  These spots can signal a serious problem while the symptoms may be benign. Dark spots on the teeth may be caused by a number of conditions, so it’s important to see your dentist soon after discovering the symptom. If the discoloration is caused by some damage to the tooth, timely treatment can save your tooth and your smile. Your dentist will need to examine the tooth and the spot to determine the cause, because a number of issues may be the root of the problem.  Obviously, the cause will determine the appropriate treatment.

A dark spot may be the result of something as simple as staining from consuming too much coffee or tea.  This type of stain may not be eliminated by simple brushing.  Also, the tobacco use may have a similar effect.  In such cases, dentists may recommend a tooth whitening treatment to eliminate the spot or heavy scaling may be the solution.

Excessive exposure to fluoride during early childhood usually cause light spots, but sometimes there is the opposite effect causing dark spots to develop.  This condition, known as fluorosis, is often associated with brownish streaks or stains on the teeth. These stains may not respond to conventional whitening treatments, so patients may need to explore veneers or other restorations to improve the appearance of teeth affected by fluorosis.

Cavities must also be considered, and this issue requires prompt treatment.  In addition to visually inspecting the tooth, the dentist may take x-rays to diagnose tooth decay and to determine the extent to which it has progressed.  A small cavity can be restored with a tooth-colored filling, leaving no evidence that decay was ever present, while a large amount of decay may require a crown or on-lay.

In addition, a traumatic injury to the tooth can cause discoloration. If you notice a dark spot that develops after you have suffered some sort of injury to your mouth, bring it to your dentist’s attention as soon as possible.  Getting an intervention quickly increases your chances of saving the tooth.

If we can be of service, please call us for a complimentary consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Tooth Root Exposed? Not good… Dentist Sandy Springs

Sandy Springs Dentist root exposureAre you the patient coming in with severe gum recession where the root is exposed in front of your tooth?  You don’t have symptoms, yet, it just looks strange and you want to know if there is a problem.  We’re a multi-specialty practice with in-house periodontal treatment.  And in a healthy mouth, the tooth roots are not exposed.  If they are exposed, it’s usually a sign of one of these problems:

  • Gingivitis or Periodontitis.  Gum disease can cause the gum tissue to pull away from the tooth, and expose the root.
  • Brushing too hard.  Aggressive tooth brushing can cause the gums to recede.  We recommend soft tooth brushes to prevent this from happening.  Soft tooth brushes used properly minimize the trauma to the tissue and bone.
  • And on rare occasions tooth developed outside of the jaw bone.  In this case, we highly recommend seeing a periodontist to determine the best form of treatment.

So if you have an exposed tooth root, you need to see us at one of our two officesOur dental team will determine the quality and quantity of the gum tissue that remains.  If the gum recession is caught early, the tissue can be treated until healthy, replaced and your tooth may have an excellent prognosis.

We offer complimentary consultations.  Please allow us to help you if your gums are receding.  Call now for your free consult.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Atlanta’s most respected Prosthodontist — therightsmile.wordpress.com

 

Dentist Alpharetta: How much does tooth bonding cost?

Cosmetic Dentist near meIt depends, which sounds like a lawyer’s answer to the question.  But it does depend on the type of bonding procedure being performed.  Is it to improve the contour of a front tooth, to replace an old filling with a more esthetic restoration or to fill a small cavity? Each procedure involves different resources, therefore different fees.

As with all dental fees the service may vary depending on where you live or where your dentist is located and her level of training.  There is always going to be a range of fees for the same service, depending on the experience of the dentist, materials used, esthetic demands of the procedure and complexity of the treatment.

The average cost of cosmetic dental bonding ranges from $250 to $800 per tooth.   Most dental insurance plans cover the cost of the bonding, particularly when it is done for functional reasons.  The cheapest, does not necessarily mean it is the best.

The bonding procedure utilizes a composite resin to restore chipped or broken teeth, fill in gaps and reshape or recolor your smile.  Basically, bonding will cover any number natural flaws by applying a thin coating of plastic material to the front surface of your teeth.  Depending on where the resin is placed, the restoration could last up to 10 years, but we usually tell people 5 years.

While they may not last as long as desired, the main advantage over silver fillings is the esthetics. Because silver does not stick to teeth, a large portion of  healthy tooth structure is usually removed to keep an amalgam  filling in place.  Whereas composites permit our dentist to remove only the decayed area of the tooth.  Also, composite bonding expands just like your teeth and are much less likely to cause cracks in your tooth.  The disadvantage is bonding with composites simply costs more in time and material.  It’s very technique sensitive.

If you would like to know more about composite bonding or whether this is the right solution to enhance your smile, feel free to contact our office for a free consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Buckhead: The Mercury Filling Controversy

Dentist near meWhenever I hear a patient ask about amalgam restorations (usually referred to as mercury fillings), I wonder why this question refuses to go away.  For decades, amalgams have been considered the primary restorative material for posterior teeth (the ones in the back) because of their long time success.  After enormous amounts of study the World Health Organization, the FDI World Dental Federation, and the American Dental Association continue to endorse the use of amalgam to restore teeth.   Yet it continues to be demonized by the public, in particular in urban legends over the internet.

As a result the trend is towards the less and less use of amalgams and the greater use of composite resins to restore posterior teeth.  One of our consultants, Tom Limoli of Limoli and Associates notes that US third-party payment data reflects that 65% of direct posterior restorations last year were resin-based composite, while 35% were amalgam.  So regardless of the empirical evidence to the contrary, the patient pool is demanding composite restorations.

Every dentist will need an alternative material to use in the restoration of posterior teeth as this trend continues.  The challenge for the dentist is that composite resins only have a life expectancy of 5 to 8 years.  Given the patient’s desire to be rid of the potential or theoretical health hazards that have been formulated in recent years, amalgam restorations will ultimately be eliminated by the slow and natural death of attrition.  While amalgam has been the material of choice for decades and still remains the primary source of teaching in dental schools today, it may not be in the future.  Given the patient demand for composite restorations and what appears to be the dentist’s propensity to capitulate, we are going to need a better solution to posterior restorations if we want to achieve the same longevity that is achieved through amalgam restorations.

The internet has continued to create an uncertainty on the part of the lay public about amalgams similar to the controversy that surrounds cell phones and brain tumors.  It is interesting to note the dilemma faced by dentists today, when we know that amalgam is the better choice for the restoration, but the popular demand or path of least resistance is a composite restoration.  This disconnect creates some interesting food for thought.[1]

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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[1] Additional sources of information came from Gordon J. Christensen, DDS, James F. Simon, DDS, and Howard E. Strassler, DMD. Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry, July/August, 2011.