Dentist Sandy Springs: How much does having a tooth pulled cost?

Tooth pulled near me
Graphic Representation of Tooth Extractions

The cost of a simple tooth extraction can range anywhere from $175 to $450.  If the tooth is broken at the gum line, it will be considered a ‘surgical extraction’ and usually costs $350 to $500.  Extracting a wisdom tooth, which we do in-house or refer out to an oral surgeon, can cost anywhere between $350 and $550, but if it’s a partially or completely impacted wisdom tooth then the cost could climb as high as $650.

The cost variation differ, for example, if the tooth disintegrates, it can take the dentist a while to get all of it out and the dentist has to take additional x-rays if that happens.  Each tooth is as unique as each patient.  It can be cookie cutter, but it doesn’t have to be.  The bottom line is the harder the tooth is to get out, the more it costs, hence the range.

The above fees often include a follow-up office visit to check healing or to remove sutures.  What should also be included is the understanding that a tooth is firmly encased in a bony socket and attached by a ligament.  The socket needs to be gently widened to allow the tooth to be removed; patients will feel pressure but not pain during this procedure. Sometimes a tooth is so firmly anchored that is has to be removed in sections.

Additional related fees, may be a bone graft ($500.00) to prepare the site for a dental implant 4 to 6 months down the line.  Many dental insurance plans cover 70 percent to 80 percent of tooth extraction costs if the procedure is considered to be medically necessary and not done just for cosmetic reasons.

Typically, dental insurance permits only about $1,000 per year coverage so if there are other teeth needing to be extracted then the cost can escalate above the annual limit.  Because of the limited coverage that dental insurance provides, most people have come to realize that they don’t have much protection from the high cost of dental care with dental insurance alone, so we try and work out a plan to help our patients.

Our goal is to help you understand a procedure which may vary depending on the circumstances surrounding the tooth being pulled.  If you have additional questions or concerns, do not hesitate to contact our office or email us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Scheinfeld Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Chamblee: How much does having a tooth pulled cost?

Chamblee dentist near meThe cost of a simple tooth extraction can range anywhere between $95 and $350 depending on whether the procedure is being performed by a dentist or a specialist known as an oral and maxillofacial surgeon. If the tooth is broken at the gum line, it will be considered a ‘surgical extraction’ and usually costs $150 to $450. Extracting a wisdom tooth, which is usually done by an oral surgeon, can cost anywhere between $150 and $350, but if it’s a partially or completely impacted wisdom tooth then the cost could climb as high as $650.

The cost of the tooth extraction can be higher; for example, if the tooth disintegrates, it can take the dentist a while to get all of it out and the dentist may charge you extra if that happens. The bottom line is the harder the tooth is to get out, the more it costs, hence the range.

For a soft tissue surgical extraction of a partially impacted tooth, an incision usually has to be made into the gums and once again the cost will increase to about $200 -$350; and for a partial bony extraction (the tooth has some bone covering it) expect to pay anywhere from $300 -$600.

The above fees often include a follow-up office visit to check healing or to remove sutures. What should also be included is the understanding that a tooth is firmly encased in a bony socket and attached by a ligament. The socket needs to be gently widened to allow the tooth to be removed; patients will feel pressure but not pain during this procedure. Sometimes a tooth is so firmly anchored that is has to be removed in sections.

Additional related fees, particularly with an oral surgeon may include an initial surgical consultation ($50 – $135), x-rays ($13 – $135) and sedation ($200 – $400 or more) if required. Many dental insurance plans cover 70 percent to 80 percent of tooth extraction costs if the procedure is considered to be medically necessary and not done just for cosmetic reasons.

Typically, dental insurance permits only about $1,000 per year coverage so if there are other teeth needing to be extracted then the cost can escalate above the annual limit. Because of the limited coverage that dental insurance provides, most people have come to realize that they don’t have much protection from the high cost of dental care with dental insurance alone.

Our goal is to help you understand a procedure which may vary depending on the circumstances surrounding the tooth being pulled. If you have additional questions or concerns, do not hesitate to contact our office or email us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Scheinfeld Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

and

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Dentist Atlanta: How much does having a tooth pulled cost?

Dentist near meThe cost of a simple tooth extraction can range anywhere from $95 to $250 depending on whether the procedure is being performed by a dentist or a specialist known as an oral and maxillofacial surgeon.  If the tooth is broken at the gum line, it will be considered a ‘surgical extraction’ and usually costs $150 to $300.  Extracting a wisdom tooth, which is usually done by an oral surgeon, can cost anywhere between $150 and $350, but if it’s a partially or completely impacted wisdom tooth then the cost could climb as high as $650.

The cost of the tooth extraction can be higher; for example, if the tooth disintegrates, it can take the dentist a while to get all of it out and the dentist may charge you extra if that happens.  Each patient and each tooth is unique.  It can be cookie cutter, but it doesn’t have to be.  The bottom line is the harder the tooth is to get out, the more it costs, hence the range.

For a soft tissue surgical extraction of a partially impacted tooth, an incision usually has to be made into the gums and once again the cost will increase to about $200 -$350; and for a partial bony extraction (the tooth has some bone covering it) expect to pay anywhere from $300 -$600.

The above fees often include a follow-up office visit to check healing or to remove sutures.  What should also be included is the understanding that a tooth is firmly encased in a bony socket and attached by a ligament.  The socket needs to be gently widened to allow the tooth to be removed; patients will feel pressure but not pain during this procedure. Sometimes a tooth is so firmly anchored that is has to be removed in sections.

Additional related fees, particularly with an oral surgeon may include an initial surgical consultation ($50 – $135), x-rays ($13 – $135) and sedation ($200 – $400 or more) if required.  Many dental insurance plans cover 70 percent to 80 percent of tooth extraction costs if the procedure is considered to be medically necessary and not done just for cosmetic reasons.

Typically, dental insurance permits only about $1,000 per year coverage so if there are other teeth needing to be extracted then the cost can escalate above the annual limit.  Because of the limited coverage that dental insurance provides, most people have come to realize that they don’t have much protection from the high cost of dental care with dental insurance alone.

Our goal is to help you understand a procedure which may vary depending on the circumstances surrounding the tooth being pulled.  If you have additional questions or concerns, do not hesitate to contact our office or email us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Scheinfeld Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Atlanta: How Much Does a Root Canal Cost?

Atlanta Dentist near meThe cost of having a root canal done depends upon where you live, the type of dentist and whether or not you have dental insurance.  The procedure is usually done by a specialist known as an endodontist, but can be performed in a general dentist’s office.  The procedure can range anywhere from $900 to 1500.00 depending on the tooth location and the number of root canals involved.  The diagnosis will require an initial x-ray, which can be performed by your general dentist and forwarded to the endodontist’s office.  Sometimes there are issues that arise where the endodontist wants to charge for an initial consultation.  This may or may not be necessary depending on the relationship the endodontist has with your referring general practitioner.  If you have insurance it will usually cover about half to eighty percent of the cost.  One of the added costs to a root canal that should be taken into account is either an amalgam (or composite) or crown restoration of the tooth by your general dentist upon completion of the procedure.

The root canal involves opening the tooth and removing the pulp of the tooth, which contains the tooth nerve that’s causing you so much pain.  What necessitates the procedure is the root of the tooth being infected and no known treatment to preserve the nerve from further deterioration.  The two most common causes of infection of the pulp are deep cavities and fractures or broken teeth. As treatment, the pulp tissue is removed, the root is cleaned with files and filled with an inorganic material that keeps bacteria out of the root and tooth.   Generally, a root/nerve involved tooth only gets worse over time without treatment.  And the longer you wait, the greater possibility you might suffer the loss of the entire tooth.

Prices don’t always reflect the quality of your treatment.  Having a sense of trust in your general dentist will usually result in the referral to an endodontist that’s also worth trusting.  If we can be of service or you have further questions please don’t hesitate to contact us by phone or by email.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Scheinfeld Orland, DMD

Howard Abrahams, DDS

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Buckhead: How much do dental fillings cost? and Why?

Buckhead Dentist near meThe cost of a filling can vary greatly, depending on who you go to, the type of filling and degree of restoration required.   An amalgam (mercury filling) is cheaper than a composite (white/resin filling), but will last significantly longer if you are unconcerned about the back and forth debate over whether or not amalgams may be linked to other health issues.  The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Dental Association (ADA) found there is no danger from an amalgam filling, but some specialists and consumers remain unconvinced by the findings.

One of the ways to find out the actual range of cost is to just call a local dentist from the internet and ask them.  You are going to find some hesitancy to quote over the phone because each person presents a different set of restorative circumstances, but contact us to get a free consultation.

While costs vary from one area to the next and from one office to the next, the cost of typical amalgam filling ranges from approximately $75 to $175 per filling, whereas a composite resin filling ranges from $125 to $300 for a single surface restoration.  You should expect about 3 to five years (possibly 7 years) of use from the composite and as many as 20 years or longer from an amalgam restoration.  Actually a well-cared-for amalgam filling can last a lifetime, so the expensiveness of the filling really becomes a minor consideration.

Restorative circumstances are going to vary from tooth to tooth and decay may be found in one small spot or throughout a tooth. The restorative fees are based on the number of surfaces needing filling in a single tooth.  A silver amalgam filling on one or two surfaces averages $75 to $175, while for three or more surfaces it could go as high as $120 to $300 or more.  The same type of logic follows with respect to composite restorations.  Since composite resin fillings are more time consuming and require greater skills to completion they are more expensive than amalgam fillings and weigh in on the more expensive side of caries restorations.

Typically dental insurance covers most or all of the costs of a silver amalgam filling, but only 50 to 80 percent of the cost of a composite filling because the higher charge for the tooth-colored material is considered a cosmetic option. One exception is when an old amalgam filling is cracked or broken and is replaced with a composite filling.

Your dentist should be advising you of the type of filling based on the size of the cavity and the location of the tooth in your mouth.  Amalgams are more likely to be placed in the back of your mouth while composites are more likely to be used on more-visible front teeth. WebMD.com gives an overview of typical filling procedures and Colgate.com lists pros and cons of different types of fillings.

Amalgam Advantages

  • Amalgam fillings are strong and can withstand the forces of chewing.
  • They are relatively inexpensive and last a long time, compared with alternatives.
  • An amalgam filling is completed in one dental visit.

Amalgam Disadvantages

  • Amalgam doesn’t match the color of your teeth.
  • Healthy parts of your tooth often must be removed to make a space large enough to hold an amalgam filling.
  • Amalgam fillings can corrode or tarnish over time, causing discoloration where the filling meets the tooth.
  • A traditional amalgam filling does not bond (stick) to your tooth, so the cavity preparation developed by your dentist requires undercuts or ledges to provide retention of the filling.  Your dentist may have to remove additional tooth structure to establish good retention for the filling.  
  • Some people may be allergic to mercury or be concerned about its effects, although research shows the amount of mercury exposure from fillings is similar to what people get from other sources in the environment.

Composite Advantages

  • Your fillings will match the color of your teeth and therefore undetectable.
  • A filling should be completed in one dental visit.
  • Composite fillings can bond directly to the tooth, making the tooth stronger than it would be with an amalgam filling.
  • Less drilling is involved than with amalgam fillings because your dentist does not have to shape the space as much to hold the filling securely.  The bonding process holds the composite resin in the tooth.
  • Indirect composite fillings are heat and light cured increasing their strength.
  • Composite resin can be used in combination with other materials, such as glass ionomer, to provide the benefits of both materials.

Composite Disadvantages

  • Although composite resins have become stronger and more resistant to wear, they generally don’t last as long as amalgam fillings under the pressure of chewing.
  • The composite may shrink when placed; this can lead to more cavities in the future in areas where the filling is not making good contact with your tooth.
  • This restoration takes more time and skill to place because they are usually placed in layers. The increased time and labor involved also contribute to the higher cost (compared with amalgam fillings).
  • Indirect fillings and inlays take at least two visits to complete. Your dentist takes impressions at the first visit and places the filling or inlay at the second visit.
  • In large restorations, composites may not last as long as amalgam fillings.

The trick is to find a qualified, well trained dentist, and that requires you to educate yourself about the dentist you choose and a basic knowledge about dentistry.  If we can be of service or answer any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Scheinfeld Orland, DMD

Howard Abrahams, DDS

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com