Drs. Novy Scheinfeld, ZoAnna Bock and Hanna Orland, Atlanta’s Implant Dentists

Implant Dentist near meMany of those referring specialists think of the prosthodontist as the “quarterback” of a dental treatment plan, the professional in the process with the big picture in mind. They usually lead a team of specialists to develop ideal solutions to your dental needs because they are responsible for the final restoration.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com
www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Sandy Springs: Considering Dental Implants?

Important Facts to Help Make Your Decision

Implant dentistMany people are unaware of the consequences of losing their teeth or the effects of wearing partial or full dentures upon their jaws and bones. When teeth are lost, the surrounding bone immediately begins to shrink [atrophy]. Implant treatment, for tooth replacement therapy, can be the optimal treatment plan. Here are some important facts to take into consideration.

 Wearing dentures [plates] accelerates bone loss, and old dentures become loose because of this bone loss. It is possible to watch and wait for bone to disappear to the point where treatment success of any kind is in doubt.

 At the end of a five-year period, only 40% are still wearing the original partial denture made for them. This is not a great testimonial for value and utility. Those lucky enough to have a functioning partial denture after 5 years are still losing valuable supporting bone.

 Of those patients who wear a partial denture, 50% chew better without it.

 One study showed that after 8 years, 40% of the supporting teeth [abutments] that the partial hooks onto were lost through tooth decay or fracture.

 Patients with natural teeth can bite with about 200 pounds of force. Denture wearers can bite with approximately 50 pounds of force. Those wearing dentures for 15 years or more can bite with only about 6 pounds of force, and their diet and eating habits have had to been modified accordingly.

 The average lower full denture shifts from side to side during chewing and is a significant problem that new denture wearers must get use to and accept.

 Denture wearers have decreased nutritional intake, a ten year shorter life span, and 30% of denture wearers can only eat soft foods.

 The single tooth implant success rate is above 98%, and unlike a bridge, the teeth adjacent to the implant are no more at risk than if no teeth were missing.

 Implant-supported bridges or dentures have 95% success rates over 10 years without the severe loss of supporting bone.

For bone maintenance, the health of adjacent teeth, the longevity of the restoration and patient comfort, implant therapy is the treatment of choice. Implants can restore chewing function to the equivalent of someone with natural teeth. If you have questions or want to know if you are a good candidate for implant tooth replacement therapy, please call our office in Sandy Springs.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A                                

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620  

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076                                                                                                     

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related Articles

Dentist Dunwoody: How much do dental implants cost?

Dunwoody Implant dentist - Dental Implant
Dental Implant compared to a natural tooth

Dental Implant

If you are trying to figure out dental implants verses the older more conventional methods of tooth replacement, the cost of dental implants at first blush may appear high, and unaffordable..  But that’s not so.  Appearances can be deceiving if you examine the beneficial differences and the time involved by our specialist.

Let’s explore the aspects of price and how different dental implants may differ very significantly depending on these different factors.

‘Where and how’ to find a low cost quality dental implant, and is most likely the driving adjective ‘low cost’ is a result of the perception by the patient that teeth are utilitarian to your daily life.  That’s really not the case, as your teeth aren’t really as appreciated as much as they should be.

Let’s examine what goes into the cost of a dental implant.

4 Factors that Drive the Cost of Dental Implants:

The Material:

The traditional materials – prices of cobalt-chromium alloy and titanium are not the same.  Implants from cobalt-chromium (CC) alloy rods are cheaper than comparable titanium implants, but when it comes to zirconium dioxide, then cost of a dental implant may appear to be cost prohibitive to the patient.  But, depending on where the implant is being placed, you may end up with a less than satisfactory result with the less expensive CC implant.

The Size:

This case is a significant factor.  The bigger the implant, the more material, the more it costs, but also the more it may do.  Also, special coatings applied to the surface of the implant, contribute to better osseo-integration with the bone, will affect the cost of the dental implant.

The Manufacturer:

Different manufacturers put different prices on similar rods made from the same material. Some manufacturers include some kind of an extra charge in the dental implant’s price for their brand name. This is a lot more esoteric and therefore harder to explain.   It’s like trying to explain the difference between Polo and Hanes T-shirts.

Finally, it may depend on where your dentist gets their implants from.  And this factor may be a function of how motivated your provider is in providing you with the best implant material for the least amount of cost to you.

If the price is too good to be true? Maybe it is.

The cost of an dental implant starts from around $1,500 up to $3,500.00 .  Anything less may be an indicator that you’re getting an inferior product or one not designed for a particular location in your mouth.  Short term the implant device may appear to be fully functional.  But if we look at the cost and the cost of other materials for dental implants compared to their operational life, the difference may be likened to the difference between Toyo’s and Michelin tires.  Here again you may get what you pay for and the initial cost may appear affordable, but in the  long term you are going to get a better result with respect to how it functions and how long it lasts if your provider installs Michelins.

Our team will not sacrifice quality for price.

A lot of your choice and cost may depend on the choice of your provider.   It’s not to say the more you spend the better you will be.  Rather, a reputable practitioner, who is truly trained in the placement and restoration (and this may be two providers), may be a significant factor in what you end up with and what it  costs.  Trust and reputation are the more difficult factors to define for the patient. If we can be of help please contact us for your complimentary consult.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Dentist Sandy Springs: How much do dental implants cost?

Dental Implants near me

If you are trying to figure out the ins and outs of  implants verses the older more conventional methods of tooth replacement,  cost of dental implants at first blush may appear unaffordable to most people.  But appearances can be deceiving if you examine the beneficial differences and the time involved by our specialist.  While I have written on those issues before, let’s explore other aspects of price and how different dental implants may differ very significantly depending on different factors.

The real concern for the patient is ‘where and how’ to find a low cost quality dental implant, and is most likely the driven adjective ‘low cost’ a result of the perception by the patient that teeth are utilitarian to their daily life.  That’s really not the case, but to put the cost into perspective, all the while considering that your teeth aren’t really as appreciated as much as they should be, let’s examine what goes into the cost of a dental implant.

4 Factors that Drive the Cost of Dental Implants:

The Material:

The traditional materials – prices of cobalt-chromium alloy and titanium are not the same.  Implants from cobalt-chromium (CC) alloy rods are cheaper than comparable titanium implants, but when it comes to zirconium dioxide, then cost of a dental implant may appear to be cost prohibitive to the patient.  But, depending on where the implant is being placed, you may end up with a less than satisfactory result with the less expensive CC implant.

The Size:

This aspect is a significant factor.  The bigger the implant, the more material, the more it costs, but also the more it may do.  Also, special coatings applied to the surface of the implant, contribute to better osseo-integration with the bone, will affect the cost of the dental implant.

The Manufacturer:

Different manufacturers put different prices on similar rods made from the same material. Some manufacturers include some kind of an extra charge in the dental implant’s price for their brand name. This is a lot more esoteric and therefore harder to explain.   It’s like trying to explain the difference between Polo and Hanes T-shirts.

Finally, it may depend on where your dentist gets his implants from.  And this factor may be a function of how motivated your provider is in providing you with the best implant material for the least amount of cost to you.  Some of that may just end up being economies of scale by your provider.  Does our provider have contacts directly with manufactures in China or Israel, where the dental implant cost can be significantly reduced, while the indirect purchase of dental implants from U.S dental suppliers may ratchet up the price?

If the price is too good to be true? Then it probably is.

The cost of a dental implant starts from around $1,500 up to $3,500.00 .  Anything less may be an indicator that you’re getting an inferior product or one not designed for a particular location in your mouth.  Short term the implant device may appear to be fully functional.  But if we look at the cost and the cost of other materials for dental implants compared to their operational life, the difference may be likened to the difference between Toyo’s and Michelin tires.  Here again you may get what you pay for and the initial cost may appear affordable, but in the  long term you are going to get a better result with respect to how it functions and how long it lasts if your provider installs Michelins.

A lot of your choice and cost may depend on the choice of your provider.   It’s not to say the more you spend the better you will be.  Rather, a reputable  practitioner, who is truly trained in the placement and restoration, may be a significant factor in what you end up with and what it costs.  Our team has decades of experience. Trust and reputation are the more difficult factors to define for the patient. If we can be of help please contact us for your complimentary consult.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC – Prosthodontist

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD – Implantologist

Hanna Orland, DMD – Implantologist

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Dunwoody Implant Dentist

Implant dentist near meDental implants are stronger and more durable than the restorative alternatives such as bridges, partials and dentures. And from an aesthetic standpoint, they look and feel more natural, some of which is due to the progress made in their bio-compatible development. Implants offer the patient a permanent solution to tooth and continued bone loss.

Call us for your free consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com
www.rightsmilecenter.com

Alpharetta Dental: The future of Implant Dentistry is here now.

Implant dentist near me

Dental implants are stronger and more durable than their alternatives such as bridges, partials and dentures.  And from an aesthetic standpoint, they look and feel more natural, due to the advances made in their bio-compatible development.

Implants offer a permanent solution to tooth and continued bone loss. Additionally, implants may be used in conjunction with other restorative procedures for maximum effectiveness. So while a single implant may serve to support a dental crown replacing a single missing tooth, they can also be used to support a dental bridge for the replacement of multiple missing teeth, and can be used with complete dentures.

Procedural advancements mean that a larger population than ever before are finding themselves candidates for dental implants.  While application and candidacy for implantation varies on a case by case basis, our team needs to determine the viability of implants as it applies to your actual bone structure.   Keep in mind, while a general dentist may perform the crown and bridge placement that is associated with implant restorations, prosthodontists are the ADA sanctioned specialists who have received post-doctorate training are your best bet for the successful completion of this type of technique sensitive procedure.  If we can ever be of help please don’t hesitate to call or contact us so we can answer your questions.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Geriatric Dentistry – Dentist Sandy Springs

geriatric dentist near me
Aging patients need special care for their oral health.

Two important oral health care concerns emerging in the United States:

  • Disparities in the oral disease burden, and
  • The inability of certain segments of the population to access oral health care.[1]

Older Americans are becoming a larger segment of our population and suffer disproportionately from oral diseases, with the problem being particularly acute for individuals in long term care facilities.

Not only do we see elderly patients in our Sandy Springs who are usually brought here by assisted living and nursing home facilities, but Dr. Orland visits numerous assisted living facilities outside of our immediate area.  By 2030, 1 of every 5 members in the US will be 65 years of age or older.  This large segment of our population is further compounded by the elderly population continuing to become increasingly diverse in terms of race, ethnicity, financial resources, and living conditions.[2]

The challenges faced by both the dental profession and the nation as a whole regarding provision of oral health care services to older adults needs a specialized and experienced team of dentists to address the issues.[3]  Medicare does not provide any coverage for dental services, and only 1 of 5 Americans aged 75 years or older has any type of private dental insurance and it will be highly unlikely that our government resources will be adequate to gear up for the impending problem of oral health for the elderly.

The elderly suffer from chronic disorders that can directly or indirectly affect oral health, including autoimmune disorders such as pemphigus and pemphigoid.[4] They generally require multiple medications, and common side effects of the more than 500 medications used to treat their overall health issues usually reduce salivary flow.[5]   And the reduction in saliva can adversely affect their quality of life, the ability to chew, and lead to significant problems of the teeth and their supporting structures.

In addition, particularly for geriatric patients, oral infection is now recognized as a risk factor for a number of systemic diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes, mellitus, and respiratory disorders.  Also, it is important to note that once people have lost their teeth and are using complete dentures, their oral health needs do not decrease.   Our jaws are not static and may continue to resorb over time.  Besides the continued resorption of bone, improperly fitted dentures can adversely affect chewing, leading to poor nutrition.  In addition, those without teeth remain susceptible to oral cancer, mucosal diseases, and alterations in salivary gland function.

While effective preventive measures exist for younger populations (water fluoridation, dental sealants and parents), no preventive measures have been devised to address the expected increase in oral health needs of the aging population.  We have developed the expertise to take a leadership role in the delivery of health care services to the seniors who have contributed so vitally to our society’s well-being and who deserve to be treated with the best oral health care we have to offer.

Dr. Scheinfeld, a prosthodontist and her daughters Dr. Orland and Dr. Z. Scheinfeld  specialize in geriatric care.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

Hanna Orland, DMD

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related Articles

[1] Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, Md: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; 2000.

[2] Wikipedia and 2010 Census.                                                                                

[3] A State of Decay: The Oral Health of Older Americans. Chicago, Ill: Oral Health America; 2003:1–8.

[4] Stoopler ET, Sollecito TP, De Ross SS. Desquamative gingivitis: early presenting system of mucocutaneous disease. Quintessence Int.2003;34:582–586.

[5] Fox PC, Eversole LR. Diseases of the salivary glands. In: Silverman S, Eversole LR, Truelove EL, eds. Essentials of Oral Medicine. Ontario, Canada: BC Decker; 2002:260–276.