Top Sandy Springs Dentist: No Symptoms?

Top Sandy Springs dentist near meJust because you are experiencing no symptoms doesn’t mean that everything is perfect. Experiencing No Symptoms is one of the reasons why people don’t visit their dentist.

We recommend our patients visit us for a check-up at least every six months.  Unfortunately, this doesn’t always happen in most practices.  According to a statistic done by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 2016, only 64.4% of adults aged 18-64 had one dental visit for that year.

Dentists recommend that you go for a check-up every six months even without symptoms; there is a need to prevent small dental problems from becoming big dental problems.  Why? Two reasons, one because patients can’t do at home what can be done in an office visit and two, because small problems are easier to handle than big problems.  A dentist finding a problem that is not yet a danger is beneficial to the patient because the dentist is able to intervene before it becomes a big problem.

Not taking good care of your teeth and gums can lead to more than bad breath or a toothache. While the nature of the link isn’t always clear, oral health can say a lot about your overall well-being.  The research has linked oral health problems such as periodontal or gum disease to many health conditions, including diabetes, heart and kidney disease, asthma, osteoporosis, cancer and now Alzheimer’s, .

Yet it’s hard to show in these studies what the relationship is because these diseases are all multifactorial.  So the watch phase is, even if you have no symptoms, it is best to keep visiting the dentist every six months. If we say that everything looks perfect than great!

If we can be of help, please feel free to give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

And

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Sandy Springs Dentist: Older Patient’s Special Needs

Sandy Springs dentist near meMouths, like people, are affected by years as well as by genes. If you’re over 60, your oral chemistry is changing—and thorough examinations of gums and salivary glands can be a lifesaving early detector of oral cancer and now, possibly Alzheimer’s.

Patients over 55 develop twice as many cavities as children do. Many times that’s because medications seniors take reduce saliva flow and dry the mouth—an open invitation for tooth decay and periodontal disease.

What should you expect from a visit to your dental hygienist? Along with your dental cleaning you may need professional scaling and root planing to remove harmful plaque and calculus deposits. He or she may also record the depths of your periodontal pockets (that space between your teeth and gums where decay and periodontal disease flourish).

Keeping track of you is a key part of the hygienist’s job. It includes keeping your dental chart and health history current, making preliminary oral inspections, and creating tooth impressions.

We are educators—someone who can teach you preventive dentistry skills—brushing and flossing techniques that make for healthy, trouble-free gums and teeth. Together, we can make an unbeatable team!

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Scheinfeld, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Chamblee Dentist: Oral Health Guidelines for Pregnant Women

Chamblee Dentist near meWhy is oral health care important during pregnancy? Mothers with gum disease have a higher instance of preterm birth, a potentially serious pregnancy complication that may cause health concerns for their infant, typically due to a low birth weight.

Pregnancy gingivitis is a common form of gum disease known to develop in almost half of all pregnant women likely due to the change in hormones. With proper precautions, pregnancy gingivitis generally ends shortly after the birth of the child, although it should be monitored by a dentist periodically during pregnancy in order to prevent this form of gingivitis from progressing into more serious periodontitis, an advanced and irreversible form of gum disease that has been linked with preterm birth.

Pregnant mothers with periodontal disease are seven times more likely to go into preterm labor. Prostaglandin, a chemical found in oral bacteria, may induce labor. Also, high levels of prostaglandin has been found in the mouths of women with severe cases of periodontal disease.

The following guidelines were developed by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAP) in response to the growing concern surrounding oral health during pregnancy:

  • Oral Health Education – Counseling and early intervention by healthcare providers such as physicians, nurses, and dentists to provide expectant mothers with the tools and resources necessary to understand the importance of oral health care during pregnancy.
  • Oral Hygiene – Removing the bacterial plaque, which researchers have connected to preterm birth and low birth-weight babies, is essential. Using the correct brushing and flossing methods greatly increase the amount of plaque that is removed from the teeth and gums.
  • Fluoride – The American Dental Association recommends the use of toothpaste with fluoride by persons over the age of six. Echoing their sentiment, the AAP oral health guidelines advise the continued use of fluoridated toothpaste during pregnancy, and recommends the use of an over-the-counter alcohol-free fluoride rinse to help reduce the amount of plaque in the mouth.
  • Nutrition – Educating expectant mothers about proper diet and nutrition during pregnancy will limit unnecessary sugar intake and in turn, prevent plaque buildup.
  • Treating Existing Tooth Decay – Expectant mothers are encouraged to have existing tooth decay treated during their pregnancy, which experts believe is a completely safe practice during pregnancy. Restoring decayed teeth will help achieve oral health by removing the bacteria associated with tooth decay.
  • Transmission of Bacteria – Expectant mothers are discouraged from sharing food and utensils in order to prevent the transmission of the bacteria known to cause tooth decay.
  • Use of Xylitol Gum – Expectant mothers are encouraged to chew xylitol gum (four times a day) as research suggests that chewing this gum may decrease the rate of tooth decay in children.

And ALWAYS Talk to Our Dentist!

If you are pregnant or are considering pregnancy, discuss any concerns you may have with our dentist.
Women who are thinking about becoming pregnant may want to consider their oral health before becoming pregnant. As research suggests, treating existing gum disease in pregnant women does not reduce the instance of preterm birth. Despite this fact, experts insist that regular oral health care should continue throughout pregnancy.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

and

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Dentist Brookhaven: The Difference between Dental and Physician Health Care Costs

Brookhaven dentist near meWhy the cost of your dental care really hasn’t increased that much?  In fact it has either tracked or lagged behind the consumer price index and this is despite all the advances in dental technology.  Compare that observation to your medical care costs.  If you go in to see your dentist and ask for an estimated cost of treatment, 9 times out of 10 you will get a quote.  Try doing that in your physician’s office.   Why?  Because your dental care has been a product of the free market system.  The insurance companies have never yet to invade the purview of your oral health the way they have dominated, if not destroyed your overall health care.

You get your teeth examined, cancer screening, teeth cleaning and x-rays twice a year for less than $300.00.  And that’s about two hours of actual treatment from your dentist and his/her team.  At the physician’s office you go in once a year, see your physician or his PA for about 10 to 16[i] minutes on average and it costs $300 to $900.00, depending on possible immunizations and your blood work (which costs more than twice what an independent lab charges if you have it done outside of your physician’s office).   Physicians are paid by insurance and Medicare submittals based on the procedures they perform and not by the amount of time they spend with you.  So the quicker the visit the more procedures they can bill your insurance.  If they take too long it cost them money, not you.  And all their revenues are based on negotiated fees with your insurance company, not the free market system.  Ah, the key phrase – free market system.  Dentistry never bought into insurance coverage for your treatment and care, and as a result of the free market system there has been a reasonable or to put it better, a withstandable increase to the cost of your oral health care based on the supply and demand curves.

So how much does insurance influence the cost of your health care?  Anecdotally, let me tell you about my daughter’s, but really my experience with health care and why we are the losers in this battle to secure adequate health care treatment at an affordable price.  My daughter had a cyst under her eyelid.  It was not visible to you or me, but it irritated the dickens to her cornea.   I found a specialist and accompanied my daughter to the physician.  It was determined that the treatment required general anesthesia to safely perform the surgery.  When I asked ‘how much’, I received no answer.  I was passed on to the patient coordinator for that physician.  So I asked ‘how much’, and again I received no answer.   They didn’t have a clue what this was going to cost me.  So I immediately said ‘sign me up, I’ll take two’.   Seriously though, they needed my insurance carrier and they would let me know, great.

I get a call from the physician’s office.  It’s going to cost you $800 and change.  Ok, great, and is that my drive out price?  ‘Oh no, that’s just the doctor’s fee.’  Ok, so what else?  I have to call the surgical center.  Ok, how much does that cost?  We [the doctor] don’t know, you just have to call and find out.  So I called.  The gentleman quoted me $1540.00 including 2 hours of facility and the anesthesiologist.  ‘Oh, and you won’t be needing a biopsy, since this is cosmetic.’  No wait, this is not cosmetic, it’s required surgery.  So the gentleman backs up and re-quotes the price.  It will be $4 to 7 thousand for the surgical suite, $1800 & change for the anesthesiologist and X amount of dollars for the biopsy.

Wait, hold on, back up a minute, you just quoted me a price that is almost 7 times what the same procedure would cost if it was elective surgery.  Ah, that key phrase creeps back in to the conversation.  Under a free market system, elective surgery only garners what the market will bear.  But under an insurance based system, physicians don’t know what it costs, so they inflate the costs and hope for some remuneration equal to or in excess of what it really costs under a free market system to treat you.  In other words, it’s a crap-shoot your physician is playing with your health insurance company.   And the loser is you.  So the next time you go to the physician or the dentist, remember why you’re paying what to whom, the physician or your insurance company.  And the next time you discuss health care reform; you’re probably talking about insurance reform.  If we can answer your questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

and

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Related articles

 


[i] About.com, Trisha Torrey, November 14, 2008.

 

 

Dental Sandy Springs- Oral Cancer Awareness

Sandy Springs Dentist near me

According to The Oral Cancer Foundation, there are two distinct causes of oral cancer. One, which I have mentioned in an earlier article is through the use of tobacco (and alcohol), a long time historic environmental cause, and the other is through the exposure to the HPV-16 virus (human papilloma virus version 16), which is a newly identified etiology, and apparently the same one which is responsible for the vast majority of cervical cancers in women.  And a small number (under 5 %) of people acquire oral cancers from no currently identifiable cause, presumably caused by some genetic predisposition similar to other cancer causing agents.

While most think this is a rare form of cancer, mouth cancer (popularly thought to be the result of chewing tobacco) is diagnosed in about 100 individuals each day here in the US alone, and one person dies from oral cancer every hour of every day.  If you add the sub category of laryngeal throat cancers like Michael Douglas was recently treated for (and most likely a result of his smoking and consumption of alcohol), the rates of occurrence accounting for about 10,000 additional new cases per year, then the death rate is significantly higher.   But these statistics can be drastically reduced when found at the early stages of development.  With early diagnosis, oral cancer patients have an 80 to 90 % survival rate.

Unfortunately at this time, the majority of cases are found as late stage cancers, and this accounts for the very high death rate of about 45% at five years from diagnosis.  The reason for these late stage diagnoses is not because these cancers are hard to discover, rather it is because of a lack of public awareness.  The American Dental Association states that only 60% of the US population sees a dentist every year, which leaves 40% to happenstance.    If heightened public awareness were coupled with a national program for screenings, diagnosis of oral cancers would yield early discovery by both medical and dental professionals.

Ironically, it is potentially easier to obtain public compliance to oral cancer screenings, because unlike many other cancer screening procedures, there is no invasive technique required to look for it, no discomfort or pain involved, and it is very inexpensive to have your mouth examined for the early signs of disease.  Realistically, it only costs about $35.00, usually 10 times less than a blood test at your annual physical.

It is important that patients realize that a visit to the dentist is no longer about a filling, a crown, or a postponable cleaning, but actually an exam that is a matter of life and death.  It’s important for patients and dentists to start a dialog today.  Even if talking about cancer is difficult, there are mechanisms around this.  Creating awareness, discovery and diagnosis is the purpose of April being Oral Cancer Awareness Month.  So when it comes to oral cancer and saving lives, these are primary responsibilities of the dental community.  The most important step in reducing the death rate from oral cancer is early discovery.  And no group has a better opportunity to have an impact than members of the dental community.   If our practice can be of help we are offering free cancer screening during the month of April.

Some Research and statistics provided by: The Oral Cancer Foundation.  Kuper H, Adami HO, Boffetta P (June 2002). “Tobacco use, cancer causation and public health impact”. Journal of internal medicine 251 (6): 455–66. Seitz HK, Pöschl G, Simanowski UA (1998). “Alcohol and cancer”. Recent developments in alcoholism : an official publication of the American Medical Society on Alcoholism, the Research Society on Alcoholism, and the National Council on Alcoholism. “Screening for Oral Cancer”. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2004. http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/uspsoral.htm.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Brookhaven – Arthritis got you down?

Brookhaven dentist near meBrushing your teeth, buttoning your shirt, or opening a child proof bottle are all routine daily activities that most people take for granted.  But if you have arthritis and it affects your hands, performing these and other basic tasks can be challenging, if not impossible. Theoretically, “exercising” your hands should reduce the pain, improve your range of motion, and, ultimately, enable you to perform more easily the various tasks of daily living.  However, early in the morning use of your hands may aggravate your situation.

                                                                            

Arthritis of the hands manifests differently depending on what kind of arthritis you have.  Osteoarthritis, which is the most common cause of hand arthritis, involves the protective cartilage that covers the ends of your bones and its gradual deteriorates is due to wear and tear or, in some cases, to injury. If your hand pain is caused by osteoarthritis there’s a high probability that flossing and brushing your teeth may be affected. 

By contrast, rheumatoid arthritis, sometimes referred to as RA, is an immune system disorder that damages the cells in the tissue that lines and lubricates the joints in your hand.  If rheumatoid arthritis is the cause of your hand pain, the distinction between osteoarthritis – and rheumatoid arthritis -induced hand pain is important for several reasons*:  

First, if your pain is caused by rheumatoid, you should not attempt to alleviate it with exercise alone. So the exercise associated with brushing your teeth could exacerbate your joint problems.  Second, strengthening exercises can be harmful if performed aggressively and should be done in moderation by people with rheumatoid arthritis.  Third, you should perform any type of exercise with caution while you’re having a flare up of the joints.

So that your oral health does not suffer due to the deterioration and pain associated with either arthritis I would suggest the purchase an electric toothbrush.  It really doesn’t matter which one you use, you just need to use one.  Regardless of your condition, my experience with patients who use the Oral-B regularly has shown results in the positive care of their oral health.  With respect to flossing, which is just as important in maintaining your oral hygiene, you may need to increase the number of visits to the dentist to clean your teeth where you can’t otherwise preform the task.  If you discuss this with your dentist, you should be able to make arrangements just to have your teeth cleaned on alternating appointments and forego unnecessary exam fees. Interestingly enough, there is a possibility that the prescription by your physician may afford you insurance coverage for the extra visits.   As a side note, if you utilize a health savings account, you certainly should be about to cover the costs of all your visits with pre-tax health dollars.  If there is anything we can do to assist you, please do not hesitate to contact us.

 

*This information is not intended to substitute for the advice of a physician. Some of this information was provided by Johns Hopkins website on arthritis. (http://www.johnshopkinshealthalerts.com).

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

 

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Number 1 Difference between Dental and Health care costs.

Affordable dentist near me

affordable dentistry near me

Free Market

Haven’t you noticed your dental care really hasn’t increased that much?  In fact it has either tracked or lagged behind the consumer price index and this is despite all the advances in dental technology.  Compare that observation to your medical care costs.  If you go in to see your dentist and ask for an estimated cost of treatment, 9 times out of 10 you will get a quote.  Try doing that in your physician’s office.   Why?  Because your dental care has been a product of the free market system.  The insurance companies have never yet to invade the purview of your oral health the way they have dominated, if not destroyed your overall health care.

You get your teeth examined, cancer screening, teeth cleaning and x-rays twice a year for less than $300.00.  And that’s about two hours of actual treatment from your dentist and his team.  At the physician’s office you go in once a year, see your physician or his PA for about 10 to 16[i] minutes on average and it costs $300 to $900.00, depending on possible immunizations and your blood work (which costs more than twice what an independent lab charges if you have it done outside of your physician’s office).   Physicians are paid by insurance and Medicare submittals based on the procedures they perform and not by the amount of time they spend with you.  So the quicker the visit the more procedures they can bill your insurance for.  If they take too long it cost them money, not you.  And all their revenues are based on negotiated fees with your insurance company, not the free market system.  Ah, the key phrase – free market system.  Dentistry never bought into insurance coverage for your treatment and care and as a result of the free market system there has been a reasonable or to put it better a withstandable increase to the cost of your oral health care based on the supply and demand curves.

So how much does insurance influence the cost of your health care?  Anecdotally, let me tell you about my daughter’s, but really my experience with health care and why we are the losers in this battle to secure adequate health care treatment at an affordable price.  My daughter had a cyst under her eyelid.  It was not visible to you or me, but it irritated the dickens to her cornea.   I found a specialist and accompanied my daughter to the physician.  It was determined that the treatment required general anesthesia to safely perform the surgery.  When I asked ‘how much’, I received no answer.  I was passed on to the patient coordinator for that physician.  So I asked ‘how much’, and again I received no answer.   They didn’t have a clue what this was going to cost me.  So I immediately said ‘sign me up, I’ll take two’.   Seriously though, they needed my insurance carrier and they would let me know, great.

I get a call from the physician’s office.  It’s going to cost you $800 and change.  Ok, great, and is that my drive out price?  ‘Oh no, that’s just the doctor’s fee.’  Ok, so what else?  I have to call the surgical center.  Ok, how much does that cost?  We [the doctor] don’t know, you just have to call and find out.  So I called.  The gentleman quoted me $1540.00 including 2 hours of facility and the anesthesiologist.  ‘Oh, and you won’t be needing a biopsy, since this is cosmetic.’  No wait, this is not cosmetic, it’s required surgery.  So the gentleman backs up and re-quotes the price.  It will be $4 to 7 thousand for the surgical suite, $1800 & change for the anesthesiologist and X amount of dollars for the biopsy.

Wait, hold on, back up a minute, you just quoted me a price that is almost 7 times what the same procedure would cost if it was elective surgery.  Ah, that key phrase creeps back in to the conversation.  Under a free market system, elective surgery only garners what the market will bear.  But under an insurance based system, physicians don’t know what it costs, so they inflate the costs and hope for some remuneration equal to or in excess of what it really costs under a free market system to treat you.  In other words, it’s a crap-shoot your physician is playing with your health insurance company.   And the loser is you.  So the next time you go to the physician or the dentist, remember why you’re paying what to whom, the physician or your insurance company.  And the next time you discuss health care reform; you’re probably talking about insurance reform.  If we can answer your questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com


[i] About.com, Trisha Torrey, November 14, 2008.