Dentist Woodstock: How Much Do Dental Bridges Cost?

Dentist near meThe cost of dental bridges varies depending on the type of bridge and complexity of the bridge required[1], the expertise of your dentist and the area of town in which the procedure is performed. Typically a dental bridge cost ranges from $900-1500 per tooth. And typically, Dental insurance will pay a percentage of the fee, usually half, depending on the individual dental plan.

It is important to keep your remaining teeth healthy and strong as the success of the bridge (depending on the type selected) depends on the solid foundation offered by the surrounding teeth. So brushing twice a day and flossing daily helps prevent tooth decay and gum disease that can lead to tooth loss. Our dentists or dental hygienists can demonstrate how to properly brush and floss your teeth.

Keeping a regular cleaning schedule will help diagnose problems at an early stage when treatment has a better prognosis.  And with proper care a dental bridges can last 5 to 15 years and even longer. With good oral hygiene and regular checkups, it is not unusual for the life span of a fixed bridge to be over 10 years.

If you’re a new patient, there’s often an initial office visit ($65-$102) and X-rays ($85-$135).  One must not forget that there are additional costs that contribute to the overall price involved in dental bridges, aside from the material and type of bridge chosen which are beyond the patient’s control.  The cost above does not include the costs for any anchoring on either side of the bridge.  So a 3 unit bridge could cost around $3,500 to $5,000.  A large share of undervalued costs goes toward the treatment itself, lab and production costs for the bridge, aftercare and the like.

Dental care on a whole is often considered expensive.  And depending upon the general wear and tear a bridge is exposed to and how well you keep your teeth free of plaque, it could last indefinitely.  With somewhere between 10 years and indefinitely, the investment becomes rather modest, if not inexpensive.

In the alternative, if the cost escalates, you might want to consider a single dental implant with a cost of around $4000 to $6000.[2]  The benefit on an implant over your lifetime could be less expensive than a bridge and is the more natural state of the art replacement of a missing tooth.   If we can be of service or answer any of your questions please do not hesitate to give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Related articles


[1] Is should be noted that both location of the missing tooth, the number of teeth involved or missing or whether there are virgin teeth or repaired teeth in front or behind the missing teeth come into play in the decision making process.

[2] The recommended standard of care for a single tooth missing is a single unit implant.  However, there are limiting factors, including insurance coverage that come into play in the decision making process.

Dentist Woodstock- Oral Cancer Awareness

According to The Oral Cancer Foundation, there are two distinct causes of oral cancer. One, which I have mentioned in an earlier article is through the use of tobacco (and alcohol), a long time historic environmental cause, and the other is through the exposure to the HPV-16 virus (human papilloma virus version 16), which is a newly identified etiology, and apparently the same one which is responsible for the vast majority of cervical cancers in women.  And a small number (under 5 %) of people acquire oral cancers from no currently identifiable cause, presumably caused by some genetic predisposition similar to other cancer causing agents.

While most think this is a rare form of cancer, mouth cancer (popularly thought to be the result of chewing tobacco) is diagnosed in about 100 individuals each day here in the US alone, and one person dies from oral cancer every hour of every day.  If you add the sub category of laryngeal throat cancers like Michael Douglas was recently treated for (and most likely a result of his smoking and consumption of alcohol), the rates of occurrence accounting for about 10,000 additional new cases per year, then the death rate is significantly higher.   But these statistics can be drastically reduced when found at the early stages of development.  With early diagnosis, oral cancer patients have an 80 to 90 % survival rate.

Unfortunately at this time, the majority of cases are found as late stage cancers, and this accounts for the very high death rate of about 45% at five years from diagnosis.  The reason for these late stage diagnoses is not because these cancers are hard to discover, rather it is because of a lack of public awareness.  The American Dental Association states that only 60% of the US population sees a dentist every year, which leaves 40% to happenstance.    If heightened public awareness were coupled with a national program for screenings, diagnosis of oral cancers would yield early discovery by both medical and dental professionals.

Ironically, it is potentially easier to obtain public compliance to oral cancer screenings, because unlike many other cancer screening procedures, there is no invasive technique required to look for it, no discomfort or pain involved, and it is very inexpensive to have your mouth examined for the early signs of disease.  Realistically, it only costs about $35.00, usually 10 times less than a blood test at your annual physical.

It is important that patients realize that a visit to the dentist is no longer about a filling, a crown, or a postponable cleaning, but actually an exam that is a matter of life and death.  It’s important for patients and dentists to start a dialog today.  Even if talking about cancer is difficult, there are mechanisms around this.  Creating awareness, discovery and diagnosis is the purpose of April being Oral Cancer Awareness Month.  So when it comes to oral cancer and saving lives, these are primary responsibilities of the dental community.  The most important step in reducing the death rate from oral cancer is early discovery.  And no group has a better opportunity to have an impact than members of the dental community.   If our practice can be of help we are offering free cancer screening during the month of April.

 

Some Research and statistics provided by: The Oral Cancer Foundation.  Kuper H, Adami HO, Boffetta P (June 2002). “Tobacco use, cancer causation and public health impact”. Journal of internal medicine 251 (6): 455–66. Seitz HK, Pöschl G, Simanowski UA (1998). “Alcohol and cancer”. Recent developments in alcoholism : an official publication of the American Medical Society on Alcoholism, the Research Society on Alcoholism, and the National Council on Alcoholism. “Screening for Oral Cancer”. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2004. http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/uspsoral.htm.

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC                                                                              

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

How Often Should I See the Dentist? (therightsmile.wordpress.com)

Dental Woodstock – April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month

Each year more than 30,000 Americans are diagnosed with oral cancer and approximately 8,000 will die of the disease.  According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI)  oral cancer, which is more common than leukemia, Hodgkin’s disease, and cancers of the brain, liver, bone, thyroid gland, stomach, ovaries, and cervix, is a major cause of death and disfigurement in the United States.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) located here in Atlanta, GA., Woodstock dentist near meapproximately 75% of all oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers—mouth, tongue, lips, throat,  nose, and larynx— can be attributed to the use of  tobacco related products.  Those who choose to use cigarettes, cigars, pipes, chewing tobacco, or snuff, place themselves at a much higher risk of developing oral cancer and other diseases, such as heart disease, emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

With the level of prevalence described above, the oral cancer screening routinely  performed during one’s hygiene and dental examination is one of the most critical preventative  components of  your bi-annual visits to the dentist .

If you find anything out of the ordinary during a self-examination—particularly anything that does not heal or go away in two weeks, or that has recently changed— make sure you discuss it with your dentist or physician.   April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month and we offer free cancer screening, so please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or concerns.

Source: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research’s (NIDCR) National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse in partnership with the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Nursing Research, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Friends of the NIDCR.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

5471 Bells Ferry Road

Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

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Woodstock, Ga: How much do teeth cleanings cost?

All during the month of April in our Acworth office, X-rays are free with your teeth cleaning. That’s a savings of up to $125.00. So for $79.99, you get your teeth cleaned and x-rayed. Get treated by an Emory trained specialist to ensure the finest care possible. We want an opportunity to show you what quality dental care is truly about. You deserve the best in oral health care. Call today for an appointment: 770-928-7281. Mention promo code April/mas

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road

Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Dentist Woodstock: Dental X-ray Alert

Woodstock dentist near meThe FDA safety communication advises dental professionals to avoid using certain hand-held dental x-ray units.  According to the FDA[1], these hand-held devices could expose the patient to unnecessary and potentially harmful X-rays.[2]  The units are sold online by manufacturers outside the U.S. and shipped directly to the dentist and have not been reviewed by the FDA and do not meet FDA radiation safety requirements.

If your dentist is using one of these devises to x-ray your mouth you need to make a serious inquiry into whether or not the device has been approved by the FDA and corresponding state regulatory agencies.  You might want to consider a new dentist, asking yourself why your health care professional isn’t using a standard wall mounted unit or one that is FDA approved, like the NOMAD.  Is your dentist trying to skirt the law and its requirements that attempt to insure your safety?

All of the units that have been cleared by the FDA bear a permanent certification label/tag, a warning label and identification label/tag on the unit.[3]  If not, then run.  You don’t want this dentist treating your oral healthcare needs.  There are too many ‘good’ dentists who truly care about your health.

The Washington State Department of Health alerted the FDA after tests on a device purchased online revealed it did not comply with X-ray performance standards. FDA is investigating and will continue to monitor the problem.[4]

For now questions can be directed to the Division of Small Manufacturers, International and Consumer Assistance at DSMICA@FDA.HHS.GOV, 1-800-638-2041 or 1-301-796-7100.[5]  If we can be of service or answer any of questions feel free to call us or contact us via email.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Woodstock: How Much do Dental Crowns Cost?

Dental crowns cost anywhere between $900.00 and $1500.00 each depending on the tooth to being restored. In addition, the cost will vary depending on materials, complexity and the dentist’s training and experience and to some degree the location of the practice.  Insurance may pay part of a crown’s cost if it’s obviously needed for medical reasons, but usually crowns are covered only on a limited basis per year.  Depending on the customers’ needs and wishes, partial and full crowns made of various materials may be utilized.  Crowns are made of gold, porcelain, resin or porcelain-fused-to-non-precious-metal.  A tooth-shaped cap (the crown) covers the entire surface of a tooth, adding strength, durability and stability. This usually requires two office visits; first to prepare the tooth, make an impression and install a temporary crown. The impression is sent to a dental laboratory or manufactured in-house with the use of a CAD aided milling machine to create the permanent crown, which is installed during the second appointment.

There’s often an initial office visit ($65-$102) and X-rays ($85-$135).  One must not forget that there are additional costs that contribute to the overall price involved in crowns, aside from the material and type of crown chosen which are beyond the patient’s control.  A large share of undervalued costs goes toward the treatment itself, lab and production costs for the crown, aftercare and the like.

Dental care on a whole is often considered expensive, but with proper care a crown may last 10 or more years.  Depending upon the general wear and tear a crown is exposed to and how well you keep your teeth free of plaque, it could last indefinitely.  With somewhere between 10 and indefinitely, the investment becomes rather modest, if not inexpensive.

If we can be of service or answer any of your questions please do not hesitate to give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Woodstock: Dental Advice for Moms-To-Be

Expecting a baby is a very exciting time, and you’re already on the right path if you’re staying on top of your dental health. With the proper dental care measures, you’ll increase your chances of having a smoother pregnancy, full-term delivery and healthy baby.

If you’re planning to get pregnant, consider having your teeth cleaned and any restorative dental treatment done first. If you are already pregnant, be sure to tell your dentist before getting any work done. You should also have a dental checkup at least once during the pregnancy. Although dental cleanings aren’t harmful, it’s recommended that expecting mothers get them done during the second trimester to reduce the risk of complications.

According to the American Dental Association (ADA), it’s best to postpone dental work during the first and third trimesters as well, as these are critical periods for the baby’s development. Your dentist will let you know what dental treatments can be performed during the second trimester, but more complicated procedures will probably be postponed, if possible. Unnecessary treatments, such as cosmetic dental work, should be avoided altogether.

If you do have an unexpected dental problem or emergency, make an appointment with your dentist as soon as you can. Your dentist will look for signs of infection and determine the need for treatment. Dental X-rays are usually avoided during pregnancy, but if photos are necessary, your dentist will take extra precautions to protect your baby.

Just as dental health is connected to your overall health, dental care is important to the health of your unborn baby. It’s extremely important to take care of your teeth during pregnancy, as some dental problems can increase the risk of complications.

The best advice is to make sure your dentist is part of your baby’s pre-natal care team from the beginning.  If we can answer any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmileacworth.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Woodstock: Gum disease linked to infertility

According to research presented at the American Academy of Periodontology conference in 2004, gum disease is linked to women who use infertility treatments.[1] The study said women undergoing infertility treatment for more than three menstrual cycles experience increased inflammation and bleeding of the gums. These women also have increased levels of gingival crevicular fluid, which contains tissue breakdown products that may be markers for the progression of gum disease.[2]

The lead author Dr. Cenk M. Haytac, from Cukurova University in Adana, Turkey, postulates that these effects occur because these agents increase body levels of estrogen and the gums apparently are a target for estrogen since they contain estrogen receptors.  Though not definitive, several studies have shown evidence that gum infections are associated with unsuccessful embryo development or the failure of in-vitro fertilization. Poor oral health is as bad for fertility as obesity – delaying conception by about two months says latest research.[3]

Experts at the annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Sweden were presented with evidence how women with gum disease took over seven months to conceive, compared to the usual five months. The researchers believe the underlying cause is inflammation. Unchecked, this can set off a chain of reactions capable of damaging the body’s normal workings.

Periodontal disease has already been linked with heart disease, type 2 diabetes and miscarriage, plus poor sperm quality in men.  An Australian study involving over 3,700 women indicated that those with gum disease had raised blood levels of markers for inflammation.[4]   Although speculative, as a precaution researchers suggest that the treatment of gum disorders might influence the outcome of infertility treatment.  According to Dr. Michael P. Rethman, president of the AAP, “[i]t is reasonable to assume that if low levels of plaque are established and maintained during the infertility treatment, gingival inflammation would not affect the success of infertility treatment,”  “[which] would require meticulous oral hygiene and routine professional cleanings, perhaps at the beginning of each menstrual cycle to ensure the presence of healthy gums.”

Professor Roger Hart advises women trying to get pregnant to get a check-up by their dentist along with other measures like stopping smoking and drinking, maintaining a healthy weight and taking folic acid supplements.  UK fertility expert Dr. Allan Pacey said, “It’s common sense advice really to make sure you are in a healthy condition [including good oral health] if you want to try for a baby.” Around 10% of the population is believed to have severe periodontal disease.[5]

So if you are trying to get pregnant and are unsure of your oral health please see your dentist.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles


[1]Journal of Periodontology, June 2004

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ananya Mandal, MD. Gum Disease Linked to Infertility. (2011)

[4] Professor Roger Hart, of the University of Western Australia.

[5] Gum disease linked to infertility http://www.news-medical.net/news/20110707/Gum-disease-linked-to-infertility.aspx. Screen clipping taken: 8/30/2011 5:09 PM  Posted in: Women’s Health News

Dentist Woodstock: Women and Your Oral Health

Dentist near meAs a woman, you know that your health needs are unique and this includes your oral health needs. And because your needs are unique, you need to take extra care of yourself.  While women tend to take better care of their oral health than men do, women’s oral health is not significantly better than men’s.  This is because hormonal fluctuations throughout a woman’s life can affect many tissues, including gum tissue.  These fluctuations occur when you mature and change, as you do during puberty or menopause, or other times when you have special health needs, such as menstruation and particularly during pregnancy.

According to the Journal of Periodontology[1] at least 23 percent of women between the ages 30 to 54 have periodontitis.[2]  And, 44 percent of women ages 55 to 90 who still have their teeth have periodontitis.  Yet many women do not realize they have it until it reaches an advanced state, which is why regular hygiene check-ups are so important.

Stages of your life – steps to protect your oral health.

Puberty – an increased level of sex hormones, such as progesterone and possibly estrogen, causes increased blood circulation to the gums. This may cause an increase in the gum’s sensitivity and lead to a greater reaction to any irritation, including food particles and plaque. Signs to look for in your teenage daughter are swollen, red and/or tender gums.[3]

It is particularly important during this time in your daughter’s life to make sure she follows a good at-home oral hygiene regimen, including regular brushing and flossing, and regular dental care. In some cases, a dental professional may recommend periodontal therapy to help prevent damage to the tissues and bone surrounding the teeth.[4]

Menstruation – can result in menstruation gingivitis.  Women with this condition may experience bleeding gums, bright red and swollen gums and sores on the inside of the cheek. Menstruation gingivitis typically occurs right before a woman’s period and clears up once her period has started.  Sometimes it occurs concurrent with stressful situations and menstruation.

Pregnancy – increase gingivitis or pregnancy gingivitis beginning in the second or third month of pregnancy that increases in severity throughout the eighth month. During this time, some women may notice swelling, bleeding, redness or tenderness in the gum tissue.[5] As a result of varying hormone levels, between 50%-70% of women will develop gingivitis sometime during their pregnancy – a condition called pregnancy gingivitis.[6] In some cases, gums swollen by pregnancy gingivitis can react strongly to irritants and form large lumps. These growths, called pregnancy tumors, are not cancerous and generally painless.

Studies have shown a possible relationship between periodontal disease and pre-term, low-birth-weight babies. Any infection, including periodontal infection, is cause for concern during pregnancy. In fact, pregnant women who have periodontal disease may be more likely to have a baby that is born too early and too small!

To prevent pregnancy gingivitis it’s especially important to practice good oral hygiene habits, which include brushing at least twice a day, flossing once a day, and using an antimicrobial mouth rinse. If you are due for a professional cleaning, don’t skip it simply because you are pregnant.  Now more than ever, professional dental cleanings are particularly important.

Oral contraceptives – while women are taking drugs to help treat periodontal disease, such as antibiotics, may lessen the effect of an oral contraceptive.  So be sure and consult your dentist about all the medications you are taking.

Menopause and Post-Menopause – not surprising given all the changes happening within your body, but you may experience changes in your mouth as well.  You may notice discomfort such as dry mouth, pain and burning sensations in the gum tissue and altered taste, particularly to salt and pepper.

In addition, menopausal gingivostomatitis affects a small percentage of women. Gums that look dry or shiny or bleed easily and range from abnormally pale to deep red may indicate this condition. Most women find that estrogen supplements help to relieve these symptoms.[7]

Bone loss is potentially associated with both periodontal disease and osteoporosis. Women considering Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) to help fight osteoporosis should note that this may help protect their teeth and your jawbone as well as other parts of the body.

What Should You Do?

See a dental professional for cleaning at least twice a year – you need to monitor your oral health.

If referred, see a periodontist in your area. Problems may include: Bleeding gums during brushing, red, swollen or tender gums.   Other issues such as persistent bad breath or pus between the teeth and gums.  If you’re a denture wearer a change in the fit of your dentures may occur.

Keep your dentist informed about any medications you are taking and any changes in your health history.

Brush and floss properly every day.  Review your techniques with a dental professional.

If there any questions that you might have, please contact or call us at our Sandy Springs office to discuss them.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

Howard Abrahams, DDS

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmileacworth.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1] January 1999 issue of the Journal of Periodontology

[2] Periodontitis is an advanced state of periodontal disease in which there is active destruction of the periodontal supporting tissues.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] WebMd. Pregnancy Gingivitis and Pregnancy Tumors.

[7] Women and Gums: American Academy of Periodontology Journal. http://www.perio.org/consumer/women.htm.

Dentist serving Woodstock: Mouthwash and Oral Cancer

There appears to be controversy with respect to whether or not mouthwash containing alcohol may be related to oral cancer.  This controversy arises out the studies that show a link between oral cancer and those that drink alcohol.  Michael Douglas is the most recent case in point.  He has been reported to be a heavy smoker and imbibe alcohol on what is rumored to be on frequent occasions.  The obvious link in theory is that most mouthwash formulas contain alcohol, so the conclusion is that a link to mouthwash must exist here also.  The problem is there are no conclusive studies and at this time there appears to be insufficient evidence to alter the ADA’s approval of mouthwash containing alcohol as an effective method for the prevention and reduction of gingivitis and plaque above the gumline when used as directed.  The ADA Council on Scientific Affairs awarded the ADA Seal of Acceptance to these products after a thorough review of data on their safety and effectiveness.

Of all the studies published on this topic, beginning in 1979, four studies reported some positive results while five found no association. (citations omitted)  What we know is that none of the criteria for causality have been fulfilled by the studies that have been published so far.  The International Agency for Research on Cancer, an extension of the World Health Organization, now identifies the consumption of ethanol in alcoholic beverages as a carcinogenic risk.[1] Alcohol abuse is associated with cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx and esophagus. Ibid.  However, the reason for this association is not fully understood – it may be due to a direct effect of alcohol on these tissue.[2]  Because of the conflicting studies and endorsements I could advise you to keep using alcohol formulated mouth rinses.  But if you are concerned and wish to stay on the safe side of the debate, there are non-alcohol based mouth rinses available that appear to be effective in the prevention of gingivitis and plaque.

Our job is to try and educate you on the contemporary issues we face in addressing your oral health and if there are any questions you would like to pose, please feel free to contact us for a free consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Related articles


[1] International Agency for Research on Cancer. IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Volume 96. Alcoholic beverage consumption and ethyl carbamate (urethane). Lyon, France: 6-13 February 2007.

[2] Lachenmeier DW. Safety evaluation of topical applications of ethanol on the skin and inside the oral cavity. J Occup Med Toxicol 2008;3:26.