Dentistry Sandy Springs – New directions in oral health care

Oral Examination
Dr. Scheinfeld examining a patient.

The hygienist plays an intricate role in the oral health care of the patient.  The role includes periodontal disease evaluation, taking x-rays and a patient’s periodontal probing and charting.  In the old days, they engaged in cleaning and flossing the teeth under the theory that at healthy mouth was primarily necessary for the patient to keep their teeth.  But discoveries in the last decade have uncovered the correlation between periodontal disease and other health related issues such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, cardiovascular disease, pregnancy related problems that assigns new priorities to the role of the hygienist and your dental visits.  These correlations have caused a new focus on evaluating a dental patient and new signals related to their overall health.   “The American Academy of Periodontology seeks to educate the public about research findings which support what dental professionals have long suspected: Infections in the mouth can play havoc elsewhere in the body. For a long time it was thought that bacteria was the factor that linked periodontal disease to other infections in the body; however, more recent research demonstrates that inflammation may link periodontal disease to other chronic conditions. Research has shown, and experts agree, that there is an association between periodontal diseases and other chronic inflammatory conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, treating inflammation may not only help manage periodontal diseases but may also help with the management of other chronic inflammatory conditions.” (www.perio.org).

The U.S. Surgeon General agrees that oral health is a strong indicator of one’s overall health and well-being (CDC, 2006).  Often, diseases give their first warning signs in the form of a patient’s oral problems.  Without consistent care and monitoring, several oral health problems can result.  Immediate risks include gingivitis, cavities, tooth decay, and other gum diseases which can eventually result in various types oral cancer.  There is a “silent epidemic” (U.S. Surgeon General) that can be avoided by regular treatment at home and dental visits at least twice each year.  While practicing good oral hygiene at home is vital to your health, there is only so much that personal oral maintenance can do.  A normal person can easily overlook conditions that could greatly complicate or even end one’s life.  Thus, visiting your dentist for regular checkups is vital to a healthier smile.

“Routine dental exams uncover problems that can be easily treated in the early stages, when damage is minimal” (American Dental Association [ADA], 2008).  Now that it is known that gum disease can be a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and certain forms of cancer, regular visits to your dentist can help prevent and treat this disease.  By treating conditions early and learning from your dentist how to prevent oral diseases, you can achieve better health and ultimately better quality years of life.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Serving residents in East Cobb, Roswell, Alpharetta, Johns Creek, Dunwoody, Buckhead and surrounding Atlanta communities.

Does Poor Oral Health Cause Alzheimer’s?

alzheimersThe negative effects of poor oral health on your overall health and quality of life have already been well-established.  However, a new study suggests that poor dental health may also be linked to Alzheimer’s disease:  a devastating illness that causes confusion, dementia and a variety of other symptoms.

Researchers at the University of Central Lancashire School of Medicine and Dentistry recently published a study[1] in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease where they examined brain samples from ten people who had dementia as well as brain samples from ten people who did not have dementia.  Examination of the brain samples revealed the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the samples of the brains affected by Alzheimer’s disease.  This type of bacterium is usually associated with chronic periodontal disease.  The presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the samples of the brains affected by Alzheimer’s disease suggests that patients with poor oral health may be more at risk to develop Alzheimer’s disease than people with well maintained teeth and gums.

This study, among others, highlights the importance of practicing routine daily oral hygiene and getting regular, preventive oral health care from your dentist.  The best way to ensure that your teeth and gums remain healthy and free of periodontal disease is the tried and true brushing of your teeth at least two times per day and to floss your teeth at least once per day.  Any additional measures such as using mouthwash or chewing Xylitol based gum are also encouraged. Getting regular, professional dental cleanings are necessary to help to remove the bacteria that can build up on the surface of your teeth, causing dental problems such as periodontal disease.

For more information about the link between poor dental hygiene and Alzheimer’s or how you can decrease your risk of periodontal disease, talk to our in-house periodontist.  Your consultation is complimentary and just a phone call away.

See more at: http://www.rightsmilecenter.com or contact us in our office located in the heart of Sandy Springs.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related Articles

https://therightsmile.wordpress.com/2013/07/16/sandy-springs-dentist-oral-health-in-an-aging-population/

Buckhead: Dentist: New Directions in Oral Health Care

mature-female-smilingThe hygienist plays an intricate role in your oral health care.  At a minimum the role includes periodontal disease evaluation, taking x-rays and a patient’s periodontal charting.  Traditionally, they engaged in cleaning and flossing the teeth under the theory that at healthy mouth was primarily necessary for the patient to keep their teeth.  While this is still the case,  discoveries in the last decade have uncovered the correlation between periodontal disease and other health related issues such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, cardiovascular disease, pregnancy related problems that assigns new priorities to the role of the hygienist and your dental visits.  These correlations have caused a new focus on evaluating a dental patient and new signals related to their overall health.   “The American Academy of Periodontology seeks to educate the public about research findings which support what dental professionals have long suspected: Infections in the mouth can play havoc elsewhere in the body. For a long time it was thought that bacteria was the factor that linked periodontal disease to other infections in the body; however, more recent research demonstrates that inflammation may link periodontal disease to other chronic conditions. Research has shown, and experts agree, that there is an association between periodontal diseases and other chronic inflammatory conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, treating inflammation may not only help manage periodontal diseases but may also help with the management of other chronic inflammatory conditions.” [1]

The U.S. Surgeon General agrees that oral health is a strong indicator of one’s overall health and well-being.[2]  Often, diseases give their first warning signs in the form of a patient’s oral problems.  Without consistent care and monitoring, several oral health problems can result.  Immediate risks include gingivitis, cavities, tooth decay, and other gum diseases which can eventually result in various types oral cancer.  There is a “silent epidemic”[3] that can be avoided by regular treatment at home and dental visits at least twice each year.  While practicing good oral hygiene at home is vital to your health, there is only so much that personal oral maintenance can do.  A normal person can easily overlook conditions that could greatly complicate or even end one’s life.  Thus, visiting your dentist for regular checkups is vital to a healthier smile.

“Routine dental exams uncover problems that can be easily treated in the early stages, when damage is minimal”.[4]   Now that it is known that gum disease can be a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and certain forms of cancer, regular visits to your dentist can help prevent and treat this disease.  By treating conditions early and learning from your dentist how to prevent oral diseases, you can achieve better health and ultimately better quality years of life.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Serving residents in East Cobb, Roswell, Alpharetta, Johns Creek, Dunwoody, Buckhead and surrounding communities.

Related Articles


[2] (CDC, 2006).

[3] (U.S. Surgeon General).

[4] (American Dental Association [ADA], 2008).

Roswell, GA: Dentist: New Directions in Oral Health Care

The hygienist plays an intricate role in your oral health care.  At a minimum the role includes periodontal disease evaluation, taking x-rays and a patient’s periodontal charting.  Traditionally, they engaged in cleaning and flossing the teeth under the theory that at healthy mouth was primarily necessary for the patient to keep their teeth.  While this is still the case,  discoveries in the last decade have uncovered the correlation between periodontal disease and other health related issues such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, cardiovascular disease, pregnancy related problems that assigns new priorities to the role of the hygienist and your dental visits.  These correlations have caused a new focus on evaluating a dental patient and new signals related to their overall health.   “The American Academy of Periodontology seeks to educate the public about research findings which support what dental professionals have long suspected: Infections in the mouth can play havoc elsewhere in the body. For a long time it was thought that bacteria was the factor that linked periodontal disease to other infections in the body; however, more recent research demonstrates that inflammation may link periodontal disease to other chronic conditions. Research has shown, and experts agree, that there is an association between periodontal diseases and other chronic inflammatory conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, treating inflammation may not only help manage periodontal diseases but may also help with the management of other chronic inflammatory conditions.” [1]

The U.S. Surgeon General agrees that oral health is a strong indicator of one’s overall health and well-being.[2]  Often, diseases give their first warning signs in the form of a patient’s oral problems.  Without consistent care and monitoring, several oral health problems can result.  Immediate risks include gingivitis, cavities, tooth decay, and other gum diseases which can eventually result in various types oral cancer.  There is a “silent epidemic”[3] that can be avoided by regular treatment at home and dental visits at least twice each year.  While practicing good oral hygiene at home is vital to your health, there is only so much that personal oral maintenance can do.  A normal person can easily overlook conditions that could greatly complicate or even end one’s life.  Thus, visiting your dentist for regular checkups is vital to a healthier smile.

“Routine dental exams uncover problems that can be easily treated in the early stages, when damage is minimal”.[4]   Now that it is known that gum disease can be a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and certain forms of cancer, regular visits to your dentist can help prevent and treat this disease.  By treating conditions early and learning from your dentist how to prevent oral diseases, you can achieve better health and ultimately better quality years of life.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328                                                                                            

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Serving residents in East Cobb, Roswell, Alpharetta, Johns Creek, Dunwoody, Buckhead and surrounding communities.

Related Articles


[2](CDC, 2006).

[3](U.S. Surgeon General).

[4](American Dental Association [ADA], 2008).

Dunwoody Dentist: New Directions in Oral Health Care

The hygienist plays an intricate role in your oral health care.  At a minimum the role includes periodontal disease evaluation, taking x-rays and a patient’s periodontal charting.  Traditionally, they engaged in cleaning and flossing the teeth under the theory that at healthy mouth was primarily necessary for the patient to keep their teeth.  While this is still the case,  discoveries in the last decade have uncovered the correlation between periodontal disease and other health related issues such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, cardiovascular disease, pregnancy related problems that assigns new priorities to the role of the hygienist and your dental visits.  These correlations have caused a new focus on evaluating a dental patient and new signals related to their overall health.   “The American Academy of Periodontology seeks to educate the public about research findings which support what dental professionals have long suspected: Infections in the mouth can play havoc elsewhere in the body. For a long time it was thought that bacteria was the factor that linked periodontal disease to other infections in the body; however, more recent research demonstrates that inflammation may link periodontal disease to other chronic conditions. Research has shown, and experts agree, that there is an association between periodontal diseases and other chronic inflammatory conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, treating inflammation may not only help manage periodontal diseases but may also help with the management of other chronic inflammatory conditions.” [1]

The U.S. Surgeon General agrees that oral health is a strong indicator of one’s overall health and well-being.[2]  Often, diseases give their first warning signs in the form of a patient’s oral problems.  Without consistent care and monitoring, several oral health problems can result.  Immediate risks include gingivitis, cavities, tooth decay, and other gum diseases which can eventually result in various types oral cancer.  There is a “silent epidemic”[3] that can be avoided by regular treatment at home and dental visits at least twice each year.  While practicing good oral hygiene at home is vital to your health, there is only so much that personal oral maintenance can do.  A normal person can easily overlook conditions that could greatly complicate or even end one’s life.  Thus, visiting your dentist for regular checkups is vital to a healthier smile.

“Routine dental exams uncover problems that can be easily treated in the early stages, when damage is minimal”.[4]   Now that it is known that gum disease can be a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and certain forms of cancer, regular visits to your dentist can help prevent and treat this disease.  By treating conditions early and learning from your dentist how to prevent oral diseases, you can achieve better health and ultimately better quality years of life.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328                                                                                            

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Serving residents in East Cobb, Roswell, Alpharetta, Johns Creek, Dunwoody, Buckhead and surrounding communities.

Related Articles


[2](CDC, 2006).

[3](U.S. Surgeon General).

[4](American Dental Association [ADA], 2008).

Dentist Sandy Springs: New Directions in Oral Health Care

The hygienist plays an intricate role in your oral health care.  At a minimum the role includes periodontal disease evaluation, taking x-rays and a patient’s periodontal charting.  Traditionally, they engaged in cleaning and flossing the teeth under the theory that at healthy mouth was primarily necessary for the patient to keep their teeth.  While this is still the case,  discoveries in the last decade have uncovered the correlation between periodontal disease and other health related issues such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, cardiovascular disease, pregnancy related problems that assigns new priorities to the role of the hygienist and your dental visits.  These correlations have caused a new focus on evaluating a dental patient and new signals related to their overall health.   “The American Academy of Periodontology seeks to educate the public about research findings which support what dental professionals have long suspected: Infections in the mouth can play havoc elsewhere in the body. For a long time it was thought that bacteria was the factor that linked periodontal disease to other infections in the body; however, more recent research demonstrates that inflammation may link periodontal disease to other chronic conditions. Research has shown, and experts agree, that there is an association between periodontal diseases and other chronic inflammatory conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, treating inflammation may not only help manage periodontal diseases but may also help with the management of other chronic inflammatory conditions.” [1]

The U.S. Surgeon General agrees that oral health is a strong indicator of one’s overall health and well-being.[2]  Often, diseases give their first warning signs in the form of a patient’s oral problems.  Without consistent care and monitoring, several oral health problems can result.  Immediate risks include gingivitis, cavities, tooth decay, and other gum diseases which can eventually result in various types oral cancer.  There is a “silent epidemic”[3] that can be avoided by regular treatment at home and dental visits at least twice each year.  While practicing good oral hygiene at home is vital to your health, there is only so much that personal oral maintenance can do.  A normal person can easily overlook conditions that could greatly complicate or even end one’s life.  Thus, visiting your dentist for regular checkups is vital to a healthier smile.

“Routine dental exams uncover problems that can be easily treated in the early stages, when damage is minimal”.[4]   Now that it is known that gum disease can be a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and certain forms of cancer, regular visits to your dentist can help prevent and treat this disease.  By treating conditions early and learning from your dentist how to prevent oral diseases, you can achieve better health and ultimately better quality years of life.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328                                                                                            

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Serving residents in East Cobb, Roswell, Alpharetta, Johns Creek, Dunwoody, Buckhead and surrounding communities.

Related Articles


[2](CDC, 2006).

[3](U.S. Surgeon General).

[4](American Dental Association [ADA], 2008).

Dentist serving Dunwoody: 8 Windows your overall health sees through dentistry.

I read this article the other day by the Mayo Clinic staff and it appears very much worth republishing.  Please read this and adjust your life accordingly.  It’s really not that difficult to lead a healthy life style and live longer lives.

Oral health: A window to your overall health

Your oral health is more important than you may realize. Get the facts about how the health of your mouth, teeth and gums may affect your general health.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Did you know that your oral health can offer clues about your overall health? Or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Understand the intimate connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.

What’s the connection between oral health and overall health?

Your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless. Normally the body’s natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and
flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, harmful bacteria can sometimes grow out of control and cause oral infections, such as tooth decay
and gum disease. In addition, dental procedures, medications, or treatments that reduce saliva flow, disrupt the normal balance of bacteria in your mouth
or breach the mouth’s normal protective barriers may make it easier for bacteria to enter your bloodstream.

What conditions may be linked to oral health?

Your oral health may affect, be affected by or contribute to various diseases and conditions, including:

  • Endocarditis. Gum disease and dental procedures that cut your gums may allow bacteria to enter your bloodstream. If you have a weak immune system or a damaged heart valve, this can cause infection in other parts of the body — such as an infection of the inner lining of the heart (endocarditis).
  • Cardiovascular disease. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke may be linked to oral bacteria, possibly due to chronic inflammation from periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Gum disease has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes reduces the body’s resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk. In addition, people who have inadequate blood sugar control may develop more-frequent and severe infections of the gums and the bone that holds teeth in place, and they may lose more teeth than do people who have good blood sugar control.
  •  HIV/AIDS. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.
  • Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — may be associated with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.
  • Alzheimer’s disease. Tooth loss before age 35 may be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Other conditions. Other conditions that may be linked to oral health include Sjogren’s syndrome — an immune system disorder — and eating disorders.

Be sure to tell your dentist if you’re taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you’ve had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition.

How can I protect my oral health?

To protect your oral health, resolve to practice good oral hygiene every day. For example:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three to four months.
  • Floss daily.
  • Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Schedule regular dental checkups.

Also, watch for signs and symptoms of oral disease and contact your dentist as soon as a problem arises. Remember, taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health.

Pasted from <http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dental/DE00001/NSECTIONGROUP=2>

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs) GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Related articles