Dentist Near Me: How much do dental fillings cost?

dentist near me

The cost of a filling can vary greatly, depending on who you go to, the type of filling and degree of restoration required.  

One of the ways to find out the actual range of cost is to just call a local dentist from the internet and ask them.  But you are going to find some hesitancy to quote over the phone because each person presents a different set of restorative circumstances, but you should be able to get a range of costs or a free consultation.

While costs vary from one area to the next and from one office to the next, the cost of typical amalgam filling ranges from approximately $75 to $175 per filling, whereas a composite resin filling ranges from $125 to $300 for a single surface restoration.  You should expect about 3 to five years (possibly 7 years) of use from the composite and as many as 20 years or longer from an amalgam restoration.  Actually a well-cared-for amalgam filling can last a lifetime, so the expensiveness of the filling really becomes a minor consideration.

Restorative circumstances are going to vary from tooth to tooth and decay may be found in one small spot or throughout a tooth. The restorative fees are based on the number of surfaces needing filling in a single tooth.  A silver amalgam filling on one or two surfaces averages $75 to $175, while for three or more surfaces it could go as high as $120 to $300 or more.  The same type of logic follows with respect to composite restorations.  Since composite resin fillings are more time consuming and require greater skills to completion they are more expensive than amalgam fillings and weigh in on the more expensive side of caries restorations.

Typically dental insurance covers most or all of the costs of a silver amalgam filling, but only 50 to 80 percent of the cost of a composite filling because the higher charge for the tooth-colored material is considered a cosmetic option. One exception is when an old amalgam filling is cracked or broken and is replaced with a composite filling.

Your dentist should be advising you of the type of filling based on the size of the cavity and the location of the tooth in your mouth.  Amalgams are more likely to be placed in the back of your mouth while composites are more likely to be used on more-visible front teeth. WebMD.com gives an overview of typical filling procedures and Colgate.com lists pros and cons of different types of fillings.

Amalgam Advantages

  • Amalgam fillings are strong and can withstand the forces of chewing.
  • They are relatively inexpensive and last a long time, compared with alternatives.
  • An amalgam filling is completed in one dental visit.

Amalgam Disadvantages

  • Amalgam doesn’t match the color of your teeth.
  • Healthy parts of your tooth often must be removed to make a space large enough to hold an amalgam filling.
  • Amalgam fillings can corrode or tarnish over time, causing discoloration where the filling meets the tooth.
  • A traditional amalgam filling does not bond (stick) to your tooth, so the cavity preparation developed by your dentist requires undercuts or ledges to provide retention of the filling.  Your dentist may have to remove additional tooth structure to establish good retention for the filling.  
  • Some people may be allergic to mercury or be concerned about its effects, although research shows the amount of mercury exposure from fillings is similar to what people get from other sources in the environment.

Composite Advantages

  • Your fillings will match the color of your teeth and therefore undetectable.
  • A filling should be completed in one dental visit.
  • Composite fillings can bond directly to the tooth, making the tooth stronger than it would be with an amalgam filling.
  • Less drilling is involved than with amalgam fillings because your dentist does not have to shape the space as much to hold the filling securely.  The bonding process holds the composite resin in the tooth.
  • Indirect composite fillings are heat and light cured increasing their strength.
  • Composite resin can be used in combination with other materials, such as glass ionomer, to provide the benefits of both materials.

Composite Disadvantages

  • Although composite resins have become stronger and more resistant to wear, they generally don’t last as long as amalgam fillings under the pressure of chewing.
  • The composite may shrink when placed; this can lead to more cavities in the future in areas where the filling is not making good contact with your tooth.
  • This restoration takes more time and skill to place because they are usually placed in layers. The increased time and labor involved also contribute to the higher cost (compared with amalgam fillings).
  • Indirect fillings and inlays take at least two visits to complete. Your dentist takes impressions at the first visit and places the filling or inlay at the second visit.
  • In large restorations, composites may not last as long as amalgam fillings.

The trick is to find a qualified, well trained dentist, and that requires you to educate yourself about the dentist you choose and a basic knowledge about dentistry.  If we can be of service or answer any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Rd

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Chamblee Dentist: How much do dental fillings cost? and Why?

The cost of a filling can vary greatly, depending on who you go to, the type of filling and degree of restoration required.  Chamblee Dentist near me An amalgam (mercury filling) is cheaper than a composite (white/resin filling), but will last significantly longer if you are unconcerned about aesthetics and the back and forth debate over whether or not amalgams may be linked to other health issues.  The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Dental Association (ADA) found there is no danger from an amalgam filling, but some specialists and consumers remain unconvinced by the findings.

One of the ways to find out the actual range of cost is to just call a local dentist from the internet and ask them.  You are going to find some hesitancy to quote over the phone because each person presents a different set of restorative circumstances, but you should be able to get a range of costs or a free consultation.

While costs vary from one area to the next and from one office to the next, the cost of typical amalgam filling ranges from approximately $75 to $175 per filling, whereas a composite resin filling ranges from $125 to $300 for a single surface restoration.  You should expect about 3 to five years (possibly 7 years) of use from the composite and as many as 20 years or longer from an amalgam restoration.  Actually a well-cared-for amalgam filling can last a lifetime, so the expensiveness of the filling really becomes a minor consideration.

Restorative circumstances are going to vary from tooth to tooth and decay may be found in one small spot or throughout a tooth. The restorative fees are based on the number of surfaces needing filling in a single tooth.  A silver amalgam filling on one or two surfaces averages $75 to $175, while for three or more surfaces it could go as high as $120 to $300 or more.  The same type of logic follows with respect to composite restorations.  Since composite resin fillings are more time consuming and require greater skills to completion they are more expensive than amalgam fillings and weigh in on the more expensive side of caries restorations.

Typically dental insurance covers most or all of the costs of a silver amalgam filling, but only 50 to 80 percent of the cost of a composite filling because the higher charge for the tooth-colored material is considered a cosmetic option. One exception is when an old amalgam filling is cracked or broken and is replaced with a composite filling.

Your dentist should be advising you of the type of filling based on the size of the cavity and the location of the tooth in your mouth.  Amalgams are more likely to be placed in the back of your mouth while composites are more likely to be used on more-visible front teeth. WebMD.com gives an overview of typical filling procedures and Colgate.com lists pros and cons of different types of fillings.

Amalgam Advantages

  • Amalgam fillings are strong and can withstand the forces of chewing.
  • They are relatively inexpensive and last a long time, compared with alternatives.
  • An amalgam filling is completed in one dental visit.

Amalgam Disadvantages

  • Amalgam doesn’t match the color of your teeth.
  • Healthy parts of your tooth often must be removed to make a space large enough to hold an amalgam filling.
  • Amalgam fillings can corrode or tarnish over time, causing discoloration where the filling meets the tooth.
  • A traditional amalgam filling does not bond (stick) to your tooth, so the cavity preparation developed by your dentist requires undercuts or ledges to provide retention of the filling.  Your dentist may have to remove additional tooth structure to establish good retention for the filling.  
  • Some people may be allergic to mercury or be concerned about its effects, although research shows the amount of mercury exposure from fillings is similar to what people get from other sources in the environment.

Composite Advantages

  • Your fillings will match the color of your teeth and therefore undetectable.
  • A filling should be completed in one dental visit.
  • Composite fillings can bond directly to the tooth, making the tooth stronger than it would be with an amalgam filling.
  • Less drilling is involved than with amalgam fillings because your dentist does not have to shape the space as much to hold the filling securely.  The bonding process holds the composite resin in the tooth.
  • Indirect composite fillings are heat and light cured increasing their strength.
  • Composite resin can be used in combination with other materials, such as glass ionomer, to provide the benefits of both materials.

Composite Disadvantages

  • Although composite resins have become stronger and more resistant to wear, they generally don’t last as long as amalgam fillings under the pressure of chewing.
  • The composite may shrink when placed; this can lead to more cavities in the future in areas where the filling is not making good contact with your tooth.
  • This restoration takes more time and skill to place because they are usually placed in layers. The increased time and labor involved also contribute to the higher cost (compared with amalgam fillings).
  • Indirect fillings and inlays take at least two visits to complete. Your dentist takes impressions at the first visit and places the filling or inlay at the second visit.
  • In large restorations, composites may not last as long as amalgam fillings.

The trick is to find a qualified, well trained dentist, and that requires you to educate yourself about the dentist you choose and a basic knowledge about dentistry.  If we can be of service or answer any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Atlanta Dentist – How much do dental fillings cost? and Why?

Atlanta dentist near me.
A mercury filled amalgam

The cost of a filling can vary greatly, depending on who you go to, the type of filling and degree of restoration required.   An amalgam (mercury filling) is cheaper than a composite (white/resin filling), but will last significantly longer if you are unconcerned about aesthetics and the back and forth debate over whether or not amalgams may be linked to other health issues.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Dental Association (ADA) found there is no danger from an amalgam filling, but some specialists and consumers remain unconvinced by the findings.

Each person presents a different set of restorative circumstances, but you should be able to get a range of costs with our free consultation.

The cost of typical amalgam filling ranges from approximately $95 to $275 per filling, whereas a composite resin filling ranges from $150 to $400 for a single surface restoration.  You should expect about 3 to five years (possibly 7 years) of use from the composite and as many as 20 years or longer from an amalgam restoration.  Actually a well-cared-for amalgam filling can last a lifetime, so the expensiveness of the filling really becomes a minor consideration.

Restorative circumstances are going to vary from tooth to tooth and decay may be found in one small spot or throughout a tooth. The restorative fees are based on the number of surfaces needing filling in a single tooth.  A silver amalgam filling on one or two surfaces averages $95 to $175, while for three or more surfaces it could go as high as $150 to $350 or more.  The same type of logic follows with respect to composite restorations.  Since composite resin fillings are more time consuming and require greater skills to completion they are more expensive than amalgam fillings and weigh in on the more expensive side of caries restorations.

Typically dental insurance covers most or all of the costs of a silver amalgam filling, but only 50 to 80 percent of the cost of a composite filling because the higher charge for the tooth-colored material is considered a cosmetic option. One exception is when an old amalgam filling is cracked or broken and is replaced with a composite filling.

We advise you of the type of filling based on the size of the cavity and the location of the tooth in your mouth.  Amalgams are more likely to be placed in the back of your mouth while composites are more likely to be used on more-visible front teeth.

Amalgam Advantages

  • Amalgam fillings are strong and can withstand the forces of chewing.
  • They are relatively inexpensive and last a long time, compared with alternatives.
  • An amalgam filling is completed in one dental visit.

Amalgam Disadvantages

  • Amalgam doesn’t match the color of your teeth.
  • Healthy parts of your tooth often must be removed to make a space large enough to hold an amalgam filling.
  • Amalgam fillings can corrode or tarnish over time, causing discoloration where the filling meets the tooth.
  • A traditional amalgam filling does not bond (stick) to your tooth, so the cavity preparation developed by your dentist requires undercuts or ledges to provide retention of the filling.  Your dentist may have to remove additional tooth structure to establish good retention for the filling.
  • Some people may be allergic to mercury or be concerned about its effects, although research shows the amount of mercury exposure from fillings is similar to what people get from other sources in the environment.

Composite Advantages

  • Your fillings will match the color of your teeth and therefore undetectable.
  • A filling should be completed in one dental visit.
  • Composite fillings can bond directly to the tooth, making the tooth stronger than it would be with an amalgam filling.
  • Less drilling is involved than with amalgam fillings because your dentist does not have to shape the space as much to hold the filling securely.  The bonding process holds the composite resin in the tooth.
  • Indirect composite fillings are heat and light cured increasing their strength.
  • Composite resin can be used in combination with other materials, such as glass ionomer, to provide the benefits of both materials.

Composite Disadvantages

  • Although composite resins have become stronger and more resistant to wear, they generally don’t last as long as amalgam fillings under the pressure of chewing.
  • The composite may shrink when placed; this can lead to more cavities in the future in areas where the filling is not making good contact with your tooth.
  • This restoration takes more time and skill to place because they are usually placed in layers. The increased time and labor involved also contribute to the higher cost (compared with amalgam fillings).
  • Indirect fillings and inlays take at least two visits to complete. Your dentist takes impressions at the first visit and places the filling or inlay at the second visit.
  • In large restorations, composites may not last as long as amalgam fillings.

We’ve been performing dentistry in Sandy Springs for over 30 years with over 1000 five star reviews.  If we can be of service or answer any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Scheinfeld, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Sandy Springs: To Remove or Not to Remove

Cosmetic Dentist near meDental Amalgam and Other Restorative Materials.

According to Dr. Oz, because mercury is a powerful neurotoxin and, at certain levels, can cause neurological issues, autoimmune disease, chronic illnesses and mental disorders, the inference is that you should remove your amalgam fillings.  The burning question is whether an unknown quantity of mercury vapor in our silver fillings at a constant exposure poses a significant health risk.

Based on current scientific data the ADA has concluded that the removal of amalgam restorations from a non-allergic patient for the alleged purpose of removing toxic substances as indicated by Dr. Oz, when such treatment is performed solely at the recommendation of the dentist, is improper and unethical.  Any dentist who claims that dental treatment or diagnostic techniques performed by the dentist has the capacity to diagnose, cure or alleviate diseases, infections or other conditions without being based upon accepted scientific knowledge or research, is acting unethically.

Yet there are conflicting studies between Sweden and the United States. In Sweden, they have conducted a number of studies where people, with pre-existing neurological and health issues (Chronic Fatigue-type symptoms), had amalgams removed; 78% reported improvement in their health status. In the United States, official studies hired by the FDA and National Institutes of Health (NIH) stated that “the current data is insufficient to support an association between mercury release from amalgams and the various complaints that have been attributed to this restorative material.”[1]

The problem is there is no direct evidence of a cause and an effect, only a correlation.  So the question remains ‘to remove or not to remove’.   Your dentist as an ethical duty to be honest and trustworthy and telling you to remove your amalgam fillings for health reasons violates that ethical duty.  So what’s a patient to do?  Unfortunately, no one is really sure.

This probably doesn’t answer your question of what to do, but it does help you understand what your dentist is supposed to do.  Have your dentist examine your fillings to determine whether or not they are intact, and have a conversation about the potential health risks of keeping or removing amalgams. Discuss the options available with your provider to help make a smart decision.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Woodstock: How much do dental fillings cost? and Why?

The cost of a filling can vary greatly, depending on who you go to, the type of filling and degree of restoration required.   An amalgam (“silver/mercury filling”) is cheaper than a composite (white/resin filling), but will last significantly longer if you are unconcerned about aesthetics and the back and forth debate over whether or not amalgams may be linked to other health issues.  The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Dental Association (ADA) found there is no danger from an amalgam filling, but some specialists and consumers remain unconvinced by the findings.

One of the ways to find out the actual range of cost is to just call a local dentist from the internet and ask them.  You are going to find some hesitancy to quote over the phone because each person presents a different set of restorative circumstances, but you should be able to get a range of costs or a free consultation.

While costs vary from one area to the next and from one office to the next, the cost of typical amalgam filling ranges from approximately $75 to $175 per filling, whereas a composite resin filling ranges from $125 to $300 for a single surface restoration.  You should expect about 3 to five years (possibly 7 years) of use from the composite and as many as 20 years or longer from an amalgam restoration.  Actually a well-cared-for amalgam filling can last a lifetime, so the expensiveness of the filling really becomes a minor consideration.

Restorative circumstances are going to vary from tooth to tooth and decay may be found in one small spot or throughout a tooth. The restorative fees are based on the number of surfaces needing filling in a single tooth.  A silver amalgam filling on one or two surfaces averages $75 to $175, while for three or more surfaces it could go as high as $120 to $300 or more.  The same type of logic follows with respect to composite restorations.  Since composite resin fillings are more time consuming and require greater skills to completion they are more expensive than amalgam fillings and weigh in on the more expensive side of caries restorations.

Typically dental insurance covers most or all of the costs of a silver amalgam filling, but only 50 to 80 percent of the cost of a composite filling because the higher charge for the tooth-colored material is considered a cosmetic option. One exception is when an old amalgam filling is cracked or broken and is replaced with a composite filling.

Your dentist should be advising you of the type of filling based on the size of the cavity and the location of the tooth in your mouth.  Amalgams are more likely to be placed in the back of your mouth while composites are more likely to be used on more-visible front teeth. WebMD.com gives an overview of typical filling procedures and Colgate.com lists pros and cons of different types of fillings.

Amalgam Advantages

  • Amalgam fillings are strong and can withstand the forces of chewing.
  • They are relatively inexpensive and last a long time, compared with alternatives.
  • An amalgam filling is completed in one dental visit.

Amalgam Disadvantages

  • Amalgam doesn’t match the color of your teeth.
  • Healthy parts of your tooth often must be removed to make a space large enough to hold an amalgam filling.
  • Amalgam fillings can corrode or tarnish over time, causing discoloration where the filling meets the tooth.
  • A traditional amalgam filling does not bond (stick) to your tooth, so the cavity preparation developed by your dentist requires undercuts or ledges to provide retention of the filling.  Your dentist may have to remove additional tooth structure to establish good retention for the filling.  
  • Some people may be allergic to mercury or be concerned about its effects, although research shows the amount of mercury exposure from fillings is similar to what people get from other sources in the environment.

Composite Advantages

  • Your fillings will match the color of your teeth and therefore undetectable.
  • A filling should be completed in one dental visit.
  • Composite fillings can bond directly to the tooth, making the tooth stronger than it would be with an amalgam filling.
  • Less drilling is involved than with amalgam fillings because your dentist does not have to shape the space as much to hold the filling securely.  The bonding process holds the composite resin in the tooth.
  • Indirect composite fillings are heat and light cured increasing their strength.
  • Composite resin can be used in combination with other materials, such as glass ionomer, to provide the benefits of both materials.

Composite Disadvantages

  • Although composite resins have become stronger and more resistant to wear, they generally don’t last as long as amalgam fillings under the pressure of chewing.
  • The composite may shrink when placed; this can lead to more cavities in the future in areas where the filling is not making good contact with your tooth.
  • This restoration takes more time and skill to place because they are usually placed in layers. The increased time and labor involved also contribute to the higher cost (compared with amalgam fillings).
  • Indirect fillings and inlays take at least two visits to complete. Your dentist takes impressions at the first visit and places the filling or inlay at the second visit.
  • In large restorations, composites may not last as long as amalgam fillings.

The trick is to find a qualified, well trained dentist, and that requires you to educate yourself about the dentist you choose and a basic knowledge about dentistry.  If we can be of service or answer any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30192

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilecenter.com

receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Roswell Dentist: How much do dental fillings cost? and Why?

The cost of a filling can vary greatly, depending on who you go to, the type of filling and degree of restoration required.   An amalgam (“mercury filling”) is cheaper than a composite (white/resin filling), but will last significantly longer if you are unconcerned about aesthetics and the back and forth debate over whether or not amalgams may be linked to other health issues.  The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Dental Association (ADA) found there is no danger from an amalgam filling, but some specialists and consumers remain unconvinced by the findings.

One of the ways to find out the actual range of cost is to just call a local dentist from the internet and ask them.  You are going to find some hesitancy to quote over the phone because each person presents a different set of restorative circumstances, but you should be able to get a range of costs or a free consultation.

While costs vary from one area to the next and from one office to the next, the cost of typical amalgam filling ranges from approximately $75 to $175 per filling, whereas a composite resin filling ranges from $125 to $300 for a single surface restoration.  You should expect about 3 to five years (possibly 7 years) of use from the composite and as many as 20 years or longer from an amalgam restoration.  Actually a well-cared-for amalgam filling can last a lifetime, so the expensiveness of the filling really becomes a minor consideration.

Restorative circumstances are going to vary from tooth to tooth and decay may be found in one small spot or throughout a tooth. The restorative fees are based on the number of surfaces needing filling in a single tooth.  A silver amalgam filling on one or two surfaces averages $75 to $175, while for three or more surfaces it could go as high as $120 to $300 or more.  The same type of logic follows with respect to composite restorations.  Since composite resin fillings are more time consuming and require greater skills to completion they are more expensive than amalgam fillings and weigh in on the more expensive side of caries restorations.

Typically dental insurance covers most or all of the costs of a silver amalgam filling, but only 50 to 80 percent of the cost of a composite filling because the higher charge for the tooth-colored material is considered a cosmetic option. One exception is when an old amalgam filling is cracked or broken and is replaced with a composite filling.

Your dentist should be advising you of the type of filling based on the size of the cavity and the location of the tooth in your mouth.  Amalgams are more likely to be placed in the back of your mouth while composites are more likely to be used on more-visible front teeth. WebMD.com gives an overview of typical filling procedures and Colgate.com lists pros and cons of different types of fillings.

Amalgam Advantages

  • Amalgam fillings are strong and can withstand the forces of chewing.
  • They are relatively inexpensive and last a long time, compared with alternatives.
  • An amalgam filling is completed in one dental visit.

Amalgam Disadvantages

  • Amalgam doesn’t match the color of your teeth.
  • Healthy parts of your tooth often must be removed to make a space large enough to hold an amalgam filling.
  • Amalgam fillings can corrode or tarnish over time, causing discoloration where the filling meets the tooth.
  • A traditional amalgam filling does not bond (stick) to your tooth, so the cavity preparation developed by your dentist requires undercuts or ledges to provide retention of the filling.  Your dentist may have to remove additional tooth structure to establish good retention for the filling.  
  • Some people may be allergic to mercury or be concerned about its effects, although research shows the amount of mercury exposure from fillings is similar to what people get from other sources in the environment.

Composite Advantages

  • Your fillings will match the color of your teeth and therefore undetectable.
  • A filling should be completed in one dental visit.
  • Composite fillings can bond directly to the tooth, making the tooth stronger than it would be with an amalgam filling.
  • Less drilling is involved than with amalgam fillings because your dentist does not have to shape the space as much to hold the filling securely.  The bonding process holds the composite resin in the tooth.
  • Indirect composite fillings are heat and light cured increasing their strength.
  • Composite resin can be used in combination with other materials, such as glass ionomer, to provide the benefits of both materials.

Composite Disadvantages

  • Although composite resins have become stronger and more resistant to wear, they generally don’t last as long as amalgam fillings under the pressure of chewing.
  • The composite may shrink when placed; this can lead to more cavities in the future in areas where the filling is not making good contact with your tooth.
  • This restoration takes more time and skill to place because they are usually placed in layers. The increased time and labor involved also contribute to the higher cost (compared with amalgam fillings).
  • Indirect fillings and inlays take at least two visits to complete. Your dentist takes impressions at the first visit and places the filling or inlay at the second visit.
  • In large restorations, composites may not last as long as amalgam fillings.

The trick is to find a qualified, well trained dentist, and that requires you to educate yourself about the dentist you choose and a basic knowledge about dentistry.  If we can be of service or answer any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Dentist Dunwoody: How much do dental fillings cost? and Why?

amalgamDunwoody Dentist near me

The cost of a filling can vary greatly, depending on who you go to, the type of filling and degree of restoration required.   An amalgam (“silver/mercury filling”) is cheaper than a composite (white/resin filling), but will last significantly longer if you are unconcerned about aesthetics and the back and forth debate over whether or not amalgams may be linked to other health issues.  The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Dental Association (ADA) found there is no danger from an amalgam filling, but some specialists and consumers remain unconvinced by the findings.

One of the ways to find out the actual range of cost is to just call a local dentist from the internet and ask them.  You are going to find some hesitancy to quote
over the phone because each person presents a different set of restorative circumstances, but you should be able to get a range of costs or a free consultation.

While costs vary from one area to the next and from one office to the next, the cost of typical amalgam filling ranges from approximately $75 to $175 per filling, whereas a composite resin filling ranges from $125 to $300 for a single surface restoration.  You should expect about 3 to five years (possibly 7 years) of use from the composite and as many as 20 years or longer from an amalgam restoration.  Actually a well-cared-for amalgam filling can last a lifetime, so the expensiveness of the filling really becomes a minor consideration.

Restorative circumstances are going to vary from tooth to tooth and decay may be found in one small spot or throughout a tooth. The restorative fees are based on the number of surfaces needing filling in a single tooth.  A silver amalgam filling on one or two surfaces averages $75 to $175, while for three or more surfaces it could go as high as $120 to $300 or more.  The same type of logic follows with respect to composite restorations.  Since composite resin
fillings are more time consuming and require greater skills to completion they are more expensive than amalgam fillings and weigh in on the more expensive
side of caries restorations.

Typically dental insurance covers most or all of the costs of a silver amalgam filling, but only 50 to 80 percent of the cost of a composite filling because the higher charge for the tooth-colored material is considered a cosmetic option. One exception is when an old amalgam filling is cracked or broken and is replaced with a composite filling.

Our dentist will advise you of the type of filling based on the size of the cavity and the location of the tooth in your mouth.
Amalgams are more likely to be placed in the back of your mouth while composites are more likely to be used on more-visible front teeth. WebMD.com gives an overview of typical filling procedures and Colgate.com lists pros and cons of different types of fillings.

Amalgam Advantages

  • Amalgam fillings are strong and can withstand the forces of chewing.
  • They are relatively inexpensive and last a long time, compared with alternatives.
  • An amalgam filling is completed in one dental visit.

Amalgam Disadvantages

  • Amalgam doesn’t match the color of your teeth.
  • Healthy parts of your tooth often must be removed to make a space large enough to hold an amalgam filling.
  • Amalgam fillings can corrode or tarnish over time, causing discoloration where the filling meets the tooth.
  • A traditional amalgam filling does not bond (stick) to your tooth, so the cavity preparation developed by your dentist requires undercuts or ledges to
    provide retention of the filling.  Our dentist may have to remove additional tooth structure to establish good retention for the filling.
  • Some people may be allergic to mercury or be concerned about its effects, although research shows the amount of mercury exposure from fillings is
    similar to what people get from other sources in the environment.

Composite Advantages

  • Your fillings will match the color of your teeth and therefore undetectable.
  • A filling should be completed in one dental visit.
  • Composite fillings can bond directly to the tooth, making the tooth stronger than it would be with an amalgam filling.
  • Less drilling is involved than with amalgam fillings because your dentist does not have to shape the space as much to hold the filling securely.  The bonding process holds the composite resin in the tooth.
  • Indirect composite fillings are heat and light cured increasing their strength.
  • Composite resin can be used in combination with other materials, such as glass ionomer, to provide the benefits of both materials.

Composite Disadvantages

  • Although composite resins have become stronger and more resistant to wear, they generally don’t last as long as amalgam fillings under the pressure of chewing.
  • The composite may shrink when placed; this can lead to more cavities in the future in areas where the filling is not making good contact with your
    tooth.
  • This restoration takes more time and skill to place because they are usually placed in layers. The increased time and labor involved also contribute to
    the higher cost (compared with amalgam fillings).
  • Indirect fillings and inlays take at least two visits to complete. Your dentist takes impressions at the first visit and places the filling or inlay at
    the second visit.
  • In large restorations, composites may not last as long as amalgam fillings.

The trick is to find a qualified, well trained dentist, and that requires you to educate yourself about the dentist you choose and a basic knowledge about dentistry.  If we can be of service or answer any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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