Dentist Atlanta: How Much do Veneers Cost?

Atlanta Dentist porcelain veneers, cosmetic dentistry, near meSo how much do veneers really cost? The cost for porcelain veneers varies widely. They can run anywhere from $925 to $2,500 per tooth. There are several reasons for the difference in cost and it also varies widely across the United States.  And yes, veneers can be quite expensive but they do offer several benefits.  One of the benefits is a distinctly improved smile.

First, lets discuss what porcelain veneers are.  Porcelain veneers are extremely thin custom made covers for the front surface of the teeth. They can be made from porcelain or direct composite resin.  Although porcelain veneers are more expensive than composite, they last much longer and are more stain resistant.  Traditional composite veneers last on average between five and seven years while porcelain veneers last between 10 and 18 years.

Veneers are used for a variety of purposes. They can be used to fix chipped or broken teeth or teeth that have become discolored by root canal work, excessive fluoride, or drugs such as tetracycline. Porcelain veneers can also be used to correct misaligned teeth or teeth with gaps between them.  But the most common reason for veneers is cosmetic. They can be used to change the length, shape, size and color of teeth. In effect, they can be used to create a designer smile.

There is also a difference in cost between having the procedure done in a metropolitan area versus a small town. Another cost variation is the difference in cost from one ceramics lab to the next. The number of veneers done also affects cost. A single veneer usually is more expensive per tooth than a set of veneers.

Because veneers are considered a cosmetic procedure, they generally are not covered by insurance. In some cases, depending on the insurance company and the policy coverage they may be eligible for a dental discount. Again, the amount and availability of this discount varies widely.  In special circumstances some insurance may pay up to 50% depending on the type of policy. To offset the high cost of veneers, most dentists offer special payment plans.

Getting dental veneers is a multi-step process. The initial visit usually consists of a consultation and depending on the dentist and the amount of work to be done, x-rays and/or impressions of the teeth may be done at this time.  On the first working visit the dentist will remove approximately 1/2 millimeter of enamel from the tooth or teeth to be veneered and make a model to send to the lab that will make the veneer.  This is most often done with a local anesthetic. Normally it takes one to two weeks to construct the veneers.  During the next visit, the veneer is temporarily placed to check for proper color and fit.

The tooth that is to receive the veneer is then cleaned, polished, and etched. The etching roughens the surface of the tooth for better adhesion of the veneer. The veneer is cemented into place and a follow up visit to check placement and adhesion may be required.

How long do porcelain veneers last? They can last between five and ten years or more, depending on how you take care of them. But at some point they probably will need to be replaced. Just like real teeth, porcelain veneers need to be thoroughly brushed and flossed daily.

Your smile is the first things that people notice about you which is the primary reason people want porcelain veneers.  If we can be of service or you have any questions, please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Atlanta Dentist – How much do dental fillings cost? and Why?

Atlanta dentist near me.
A mercury filled amalgam

The cost of a filling can vary greatly, depending on who you go to, the type of filling and degree of restoration required.   An amalgam (mercury filling) is cheaper than a composite (white/resin filling), but will last significantly longer if you are unconcerned about aesthetics and the back and forth debate over whether or not amalgams may be linked to other health issues.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Dental Association (ADA) found there is no danger from an amalgam filling, but some specialists and consumers remain unconvinced by the findings.

Each person presents a different set of restorative circumstances, but you should be able to get a range of costs with our free consultation.

The cost of typical amalgam filling ranges from approximately $95 to $275 per filling, whereas a composite resin filling ranges from $150 to $400 for a single surface restoration.  You should expect about 3 to five years (possibly 7 years) of use from the composite and as many as 20 years or longer from an amalgam restoration.  Actually a well-cared-for amalgam filling can last a lifetime, so the expensiveness of the filling really becomes a minor consideration.

Restorative circumstances are going to vary from tooth to tooth and decay may be found in one small spot or throughout a tooth. The restorative fees are based on the number of surfaces needing filling in a single tooth.  A silver amalgam filling on one or two surfaces averages $95 to $175, while for three or more surfaces it could go as high as $150 to $350 or more.  The same type of logic follows with respect to composite restorations.  Since composite resin fillings are more time consuming and require greater skills to completion they are more expensive than amalgam fillings and weigh in on the more expensive side of caries restorations.

Typically dental insurance covers most or all of the costs of a silver amalgam filling, but only 50 to 80 percent of the cost of a composite filling because the higher charge for the tooth-colored material is considered a cosmetic option. One exception is when an old amalgam filling is cracked or broken and is replaced with a composite filling.

We advise you of the type of filling based on the size of the cavity and the location of the tooth in your mouth.  Amalgams are more likely to be placed in the back of your mouth while composites are more likely to be used on more-visible front teeth.

Amalgam Advantages

  • Amalgam fillings are strong and can withstand the forces of chewing.
  • They are relatively inexpensive and last a long time, compared with alternatives.
  • An amalgam filling is completed in one dental visit.

Amalgam Disadvantages

  • Amalgam doesn’t match the color of your teeth.
  • Healthy parts of your tooth often must be removed to make a space large enough to hold an amalgam filling.
  • Amalgam fillings can corrode or tarnish over time, causing discoloration where the filling meets the tooth.
  • A traditional amalgam filling does not bond (stick) to your tooth, so the cavity preparation developed by your dentist requires undercuts or ledges to provide retention of the filling.  Your dentist may have to remove additional tooth structure to establish good retention for the filling.
  • Some people may be allergic to mercury or be concerned about its effects, although research shows the amount of mercury exposure from fillings is similar to what people get from other sources in the environment.

Composite Advantages

  • Your fillings will match the color of your teeth and therefore undetectable.
  • A filling should be completed in one dental visit.
  • Composite fillings can bond directly to the tooth, making the tooth stronger than it would be with an amalgam filling.
  • Less drilling is involved than with amalgam fillings because your dentist does not have to shape the space as much to hold the filling securely.  The bonding process holds the composite resin in the tooth.
  • Indirect composite fillings are heat and light cured increasing their strength.
  • Composite resin can be used in combination with other materials, such as glass ionomer, to provide the benefits of both materials.

Composite Disadvantages

  • Although composite resins have become stronger and more resistant to wear, they generally don’t last as long as amalgam fillings under the pressure of chewing.
  • The composite may shrink when placed; this can lead to more cavities in the future in areas where the filling is not making good contact with your tooth.
  • This restoration takes more time and skill to place because they are usually placed in layers. The increased time and labor involved also contribute to the higher cost (compared with amalgam fillings).
  • Indirect fillings and inlays take at least two visits to complete. Your dentist takes impressions at the first visit and places the filling or inlay at the second visit.
  • In large restorations, composites may not last as long as amalgam fillings.

We’ve been performing dentistry in Sandy Springs for over 30 years with over 1000 five star reviews.  If we can be of service or answer any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Scheinfeld, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Atlanta: How Much Do Teeth Cleanings Cost?

Oral Exam
Oral Examination as a part of your teeth cleaning

So you got a mailer coupon from a dentist that says they only charge $49.95 for a regular cleaning & $19.95 for an exam & x-ray.  Seems kind of a cheap gimmick?  And a lot of the times it might be, it just depends on the practice.  If it’s a mature practice you might want to question why they are giving away services?  Usually, it’s a loss leader, something they use to get you in and pressure you into other dental procedures.

If it’s a new practice, then providing discounted services is one of the few methods a new practice has to introduce itself to the surrounding community, no different than a new restaurant trying to showcase its menu.  The genuine intent is to build a relationship by showcasing the practice.

Dental costs will vary widely, depending on where you go and the quality of the practice you see.  With respect to continuing care (on your next 6 month visit), a teeth cleaning charge is going to range somewhere around $65 to $89, but it can be more if there’s a need to do a full mouth root scaling. Often dental insurance will cover some or all of this cost for a specific number of cleanings per year.  The exam is $45 to $55 and the 4 basic bite wing x-rays are around $59 to $72.  Depending on your insurance this might be covered anywhere from 60 to 100% after a small deductible is met.   Periodic X-rays ($32 -$135) are needed to see if any problems are developing inside the teeth or around the jaw bone, and are generally required before cleaning the teeth of a new patient (which is why some practices offer coupons to defray the initial cost of a first visit). These are also often covered by dental insurance.

The main goal of professional teeth cleaning is to prevent gum disease, which is the primary cause of tooth loss.  Dental hygiene is imperative, and cleaning your teeth is the first step toward their long term preservation.  In a standard cleaning, a dental hygienist (working under a dentist’s supervision) removes soft plaque and hard tartar (mineralized plaque that builds up on the teeth and can only be removed with professional instruments) from above and below the gum line on all the teeth. The process requires one office visit and usually takes about 30 to 60 minutes.

The more extensive deep cleaning process called scaling and root planing is done by quadrants (upper right, upper left, lower right, lower left) at a cost of about $100-$400 per quadrant depending on the severity of the problem or $400-$1,600for the entire mouth, but more often than not, if the mouth is in such poor health the dentist will refer the patient out to a periodontist.   Most dental insurance includes these procedures.

Again, the goal is a healthy mouth which an integral part of your overall health.  Oh, and by the way, just because you had your teeth cleaned professionally, the jobs not done.  You have to do your part and brush and floss daily if you want to keep them.   If you have additional questions, feel free to email or call our office.  Our goal here is to create an informed patient.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

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Atlanta Dentist: Clark Howard or Real Oral Health Care?

Atlanta Dentist near meIn response to Clark Howard’s opinion on dentists and mid-level providers, he’s dead wrong or could be.[1]  And he doesn’t understand the sector of patients who do and don’t seek to have proper oral health care.

Take my word for it, if Mr. Howard had a heart-attack today, price of care would be the last thing on his mind.  Do you really think he would negotiate before they installed the stint or after?[2]  His perspective is steeped in ignorance. The answer is not as Mr. Howard would suggest, devoting energy and time and money to creating a lesser trained dental provider to deliver a poor approximation of comprehensive dental care (in Georgia). [3]

His opinion comes from the lack of understanding of what a dentist is trained to do.  Clark Howard is living back in the 20’s, the 1820’s, where the only thing a dentist did was pull teeth and cut hair. But that’s not the case with your dentist in the 21st Century.

A recent example in our office was the discovery of suspicious cells on the underside of the patient’s tongue.  Ultimately, our discovery and recommendation  saved this patients life.  Our early detection of cancer comes from years of (university) training and experience that transcends the old view of what a dentist does for that 15 minute examination during your regularly scheduled hygiene appointment.  Contrary to your physician’s health care, the cost of delivering dentistry is under constant pressures from the free market system.  And the last thing my profession needs is being marginalized by the armchair quarterbacking of Clark Howard.

The answer to providing adequate and broad based oral health care lies in educating patients about the value of good oral health, who can best deliver the care, and how consumers can obtain and maintain that care.  Marred by an old view of dentists and dentistry, Mr. Howard is stuck in a mindset that all dentists do is just drill-and-fill.  There is much more to the art and science of dentistry than Clark Howard is remotely aware.  While he peddles that frugal baloney, I promise you he lives in a million dollar home and affords himself all of the luxuries  anyone making a million a year does.

What Clark Howard needs to tell you is that our society needs to understand the need to regularly maintain their oral health and that dental care for them and their families is not optional.  We need to instill in our society the need to maintain an oral health care regimen that includes visiting the dentist is a part of that regimen.  I find it interesting that Clark Howard wants to put you in a position where you bargain for your health care needs.[4]  Where he fails in his advice is to differentiate between oral health care and retail dentistry.

With regards to the specific point of creating mid-level providers as has happened in Alaska, census data demonstrates that 43% of our “public” health care providers aren’t busy because patients don’t show up for their appointments. This is not a lack of dentists, rather a lack of using the care available.  While there is no empirical evidence as to ‘why’, one would speculate it is because like Mr. Clark Howard, a large portion of the public fail to value the real benefits of oral health care.  Take a credible, but uninformed spokesperson like Clark Howard, and the notion that all dentists do is drill-and-fill and we, as providers are starting 10 yards behind the starting line.

The real solution is better patient education.

If we can answer your questions or you have comments, please feel free to weigh in on this matter.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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https://therightsmile.wordpress.com/2012/10/17/cheap-dental-implants-not-so-fast/

https://therightsmile.wordpress.com/2012/07/02/dentist-atlanta-the-difference-between-dental-and-physician-health-care-costs/


[4] This isn’t to suggest that we as a discipline of health care aren’t competitive.  The free market system has kept dentistry fairly moderate in terms of cost compared to the annual leaps in insurance coverage and physician/hospital care.

Dentist Atlanta: 20 year Anniversary

As we approach the conclusion of Dr. Scheinfeld’s 20th year as owner of the Right Smile Center, our dental family is growing in an incredible way.  We are over-joyed by Dr. Scheinfeld’s daughter Hanna joining her older sister Zoey this fall at GRU’s School of Dental Medicine.  It is every parent’s dream to have a child follow in their footsteps (let alone two), but when it becomes a reality there are not words to describe the joy and happiness of this occasion.

Finally, we are pleased and proud of our associate Dr. Sidney Tourial being installed as the 2012 -13 President of the Georgia Dental Association.  It is a great honor to know we are contributing to our patient community and colleagues in so many ways made possible by these efforts.

One of the most rewarding aspects of dentistry is seeing and treating our patients as each generation of their families grows.  As we have experienced your joy, we are excited to return the blessing and look forward to our next generation growing with your family…

Drs. Scheinfeld, Scheinfeld & Scheinfeld Coming 2016!

Thanks for allowing us to share in our joy.  We wish you a continued happy and healthy New Year!

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Atlanta: Mouthwash and Oral Cancer

Atlanta dentist near meThere appears to be controversy with respect to whether or not mouthwash containing alcohol may be related to oral cancer.  This controversy arises out the studies that show a link between oral cancer and those that drink alcohol.  Michael Douglas is the most recent case in point.  He has been reported to be a heavy smoker and imbibe alcohol on what is rumored to be on frequent occasions.  The obvious link in theory is that most mouthwash formulas contain alcohol, so the conclusion is that a link to mouthwash must exist here also.  The problem is there are no conclusive studies and at this time there appears to be insufficient evidence to alter the ADA’s approval of mouthwash containing alcohol as an effective method for the prevention and reduction of gingivitis and plaque above the gumline when used as directed.  The ADA Council on Scientific Affairs awarded the ADA Seal of Acceptance to these products after a thorough review of data on their safety and effectiveness.

Of all the studies published on this topic, beginning in 1979, four studies reported some positive results while five found no association. (citations omitted)  What we know is that none of the criteria for causality have been fulfilled by the studies that have been published so far.  The International Agency for Research on Cancer, an extension of the World Health Organization, now identifies the consumption of ethanol in alcoholic beverages as a carcinogenic risk.[1] Alcohol abuse is associated with cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx and esophagus. Ibid. However, the reason for this association is not fully understood – it may be due to a direct effect of alcohol on these tissue.[2] Because of the conflicting studies and endorsements I could advise you to keep using alcohol formulated mouth rinses.  But if you are concerned and wish to stay on the safe side of the debate, there are non-alcohol based mouth rinses available that appear to be effective in the prevention of gingivitis and plaque.

Our job is to try and educate you on the contemporary issues we face in addressing your oral health and if there are any questions you would like to pose, please feel free to contact us for a free consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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[1] International Agency for Research on Cancer. IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Volume 96. Alcoholic beverage consumption and ethyl carbamate (urethane). Lyon, France: 6-13 February 2007.

[2] Lachenmeier DW. Safety evaluation of topical applications of ethanol on the skin and inside the oral cavity. J Occup Med Toxicol 2008;3:26.

Dentist Atlanta: How much does having a tooth pulled cost?

The cost of a simple tooth extraction can range anywhere from $95 to $250 depending on whether the procedure is being performed by a dentist or a specialist known as an oral and maxillofacial surgeon.  If the tooth is broken at the gum line, it will be considered a ‘surgical extraction’ and usually costs $150 to $300.  Extracting a wisdom tooth, which is usually done by an oral surgeon, can cost anywhere between $150 and $350, but if it’s a partially or completely impacted wisdom tooth then the cost could climb as high as $650.

The cost of the tooth extraction can be higher; for example, if the tooth disintegrates, it can take the dentist a while to get all of it out and the dentist may charge you extra if that happens.  Each patient and each tooth is unique.  It can be cookie cutter, but it doesn’t have to be.  The bottom line is the harder the tooth is to get out, the more it costs, hence the range.

For a soft tissue surgical extraction of a partially impacted tooth, an incision usually has to be made into the gums and once again the cost will increase to about $200 -$350; and for a partial bony extraction (the tooth has some bone covering it) expect to pay anywhere from $300 -$600.

The above fees often include a follow-up office visit to check healing or to remove sutures.  What should also be included is the understanding that a tooth is firmly encased in a bony socket and attached by a ligament.  The socket needs to be gently widened to allow the tooth to be removed; patients will feel pressure but not pain during this procedure. Sometimes a tooth is so firmly anchored that is has to be removed in sections.

Additional related fees, particularly with an oral surgeon may include an initial surgical consultation ($50 – $135), x-rays ($13 – $135) and sedation ($200 – $400 or more) if required.  Many dental insurance plans cover 70 percent to 80 percent of tooth extraction costs if the procedure is considered to be medically necessary and not done just for cosmetic reasons.

Typically, dental insurance permits only about $1,000 per year coverage so if there are other teeth needing to be extracted then the cost can escalate above the annual limit.  Because of the limited coverage that dental insurance provides, most people have come to realize that they don’t have much protection from the high cost of dental care with dental insurance alone.

Our goal is to help you understand a procedure which may vary depending on the circumstances surrounding the tooth being pulled.  If you have additional questions or concerns, do not hesitate to contact our office or email us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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