Dentist Woodstock: How Much Do Dental Bridges Cost?

The cost of dental bridges varies depending on the type of bridge and complexity of the bridge required[1], the expertise of your dentist and the area of town in which the procedure is performed. Typically a dental bridge cost ranges from $900-1400 per tooth. Dental insurance will typically pay a percentage of the fee, usually half, depending on the individual dental plan.

It is important to keep your remaining teeth healthy and strong as the success of the bridge (depending on the type selected) depends on the solid foundation offered by the surrounding teeth. Brushing twice a day and flossing daily helps prevent tooth decay and gum disease that can lead to tooth loss. Your dentist or dental hygienist can demonstrate how to properly brush and floss your teeth. Keeping a regular cleaning schedule will help diagnose problems at an early stage when treatment has a better prognosis.  With proper care a dental bridges can last 5 to 15 years and even longer. With good oral hygiene and regular checkups, it is not unusual for the life span of a fixed bridge to be over 10 years.

If you’re a new patient, there’s often an initial office visit ($65-$102) and X-rays ($85-$135).  One must not forget that there are additional costs that contribute to the overall price involved in dental bridges, aside from the material and type of bridge chosen which are beyond the patient’s control.  The cost above does not include the costs for any anchoring on either side of the bridge.  So a 3 unit bridge could cost around $3,500 to $5,000.  A large share of undervalued costs goes toward the treatment itself, lab and production costs for the bridge, aftercare and the like.

Dental care on a whole is often considered expensive.  And depending upon the general wear and tear a bridge is exposed to and how well you keep your teeth free of plaque, it could last indefinitely.  With somewhere between 10 and indefinitely, the investment becomes rather modest, if not inexpensive.

In the alternative, if the cost escalates, you might want to consider a single dental implant with a cost of around $4000 to $6000.[2]  The benefit on an implant over your lifetime could be less expensive than a bridge and is the more natural state of the art replacement of a missing tooth.   If we can be of service or answer any of your questions please do not hesitate to give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

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[1] Is should be noted that both location of the missing tooth, the number of teeth involved or missing or whether there are virgin teeth or repaired teeth in front or behind the missing teeth come into play in the decision making process.

[2] The recommended standard of care for a single tooth missing is a single unit implant.  However, there are limiting factors, including insurance coverage that come into play in the decision making process.

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Dentist Woodstock: How Much Does a Root Canal Cost?

The cost of having a root canal done depends upon where you live, the type of dentist and whether or not you have dental insurance.  The procedure is usually done by a specialist known as an endodontist, but can be performed by a general dentist.  The procedure can range anywhere from $900 to 1500.00 depending on the tooth location and the number of root canals involved.  The diagnosis will require an initial x-ray, which can be performed by your general dentist and forwarded to the endodontist’s office.  Sometimes there are issues that arise where the endodontist wants to charge for an initial consultation.  This may or may not be necessary depending on the relationship the endodontist has with your referring general practitioner.  If you have insurance it will usually cover about half to eighty percent of the cost.  One of the added costs to a root canal that should be taken into account is either an amalgam (or composite) or crown restoration of the tooth by your general dentist upon completion of the procedure.

The root canal involves opening the tooth and removing the pulp of the tooth, which contains the tooth nerve that’s causing you so much pain.  What necessitates the procedure is the root of the tooth being infected and no known treatment to preserve the nerve from further deterioration.  The two most common causes of infection of the pulp are deep cavities and fractures or broken teeth. As treatment, the pulp tissue is removed, the root is cleaned with files and filled with an inorganic material that keeps bacteria out of the root and tooth.   Generally, a root/nerve involved tooth only gets worse over time without treatment.  And the longer you wait, sometimes results in the loss of the entire tooth.

Prices don’t always reflect the quality of your treatment.  Having a sense of trust in your general dentist will usually result in the referral to an endodontist that’s also worth trusting.  If we can be of service or you have further questions please don’t hesitate to contact us by phone or by email.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road

Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

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Dentist Woodstock- Oral Cancer Awareness

According to The Oral Cancer Foundation, there are two distinct causes of oral cancer. One, which I have mentioned in an earlier article is through the use of tobacco (and alcohol), a long time historic environmental cause, and the other is through the exposure to the HPV-16 virus (human papilloma virus version 16), which is a newly identified etiology, and apparently the same one which is responsible for the vast majority of cervical cancers in women.  And a small number (under 5 %) of people acquire oral cancers from no currently identifiable cause, presumably caused by some genetic predisposition similar to other cancer causing agents.

While most think this is a rare form of cancer, mouth cancer (popularly thought to be the result of chewing tobacco) is diagnosed in about 100 individuals each day here in the US alone, and one person dies from oral cancer every hour of every day.  If you add the sub category of laryngeal throat cancers like Michael Douglas was recently treated for (and most likely a result of his smoking and consumption of alcohol), the rates of occurrence accounting for about 10,000 additional new cases per year, then the death rate is significantly higher.   But these statistics can be drastically reduced when found at the early stages of development.  With early diagnosis, oral cancer patients have an 80 to 90 % survival rate.

Unfortunately at this time, the majority of cases are found as late stage cancers, and this accounts for the very high death rate of about 45% at five years from diagnosis.  The reason for these late stage diagnoses is not because these cancers are hard to discover, rather it is because of a lack of public awareness.  The American Dental Association states that only 60% of the US population sees a dentist every year, which leaves 40% to happenstance.    If heightened public awareness were coupled with a national program for screenings, diagnosis of oral cancers would yield early discovery by both medical and dental professionals.

Ironically, it is potentially easier to obtain public compliance to oral cancer screenings, because unlike many other cancer screening procedures, there is no invasive technique required to look for it, no discomfort or pain involved, and it is very inexpensive to have your mouth examined for the early signs of disease.  Realistically, it only costs about $35.00, usually 10 times less than a blood test at your annual physical.

It is important that patients realize that a visit to the dentist is no longer about a filling, a crown, or a postponable cleaning, but actually an exam that is a matter of life and death.  It’s important for patients and dentists to start a dialog today.  Even if talking about cancer is difficult, there are mechanisms around this.  Creating awareness, discovery and diagnosis is the purpose of April being Oral Cancer Awareness Month.  So when it comes to oral cancer and saving lives, these are primary responsibilities of the dental community.  The most important step in reducing the death rate from oral cancer is early discovery.  And no group has a better opportunity to have an impact than members of the dental community.   If our practice can be of help we are offering free cancer screening during the month of April.

 

Some Research and statistics provided by: The Oral Cancer Foundation.  Kuper H, Adami HO, Boffetta P (June 2002). “Tobacco use, cancer causation and public health impact”. Journal of internal medicine 251 (6): 455–66. Seitz HK, Pöschl G, Simanowski UA (1998). “Alcohol and cancer”. Recent developments in alcoholism : an official publication of the American Medical Society on Alcoholism, the Research Society on Alcoholism, and the National Council on Alcoholism. “Screening for Oral Cancer”. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2004. http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/uspsoral.htm.

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC                                                                              

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

How Often Should I See the Dentist? (therightsmile.wordpress.com)

Dentist Woodstock: How Much do Dental Crowns Cost?

Dental crowns cost anywhere between $900.00 and $1500.00 each depending on the tooth to being restored. In addition, the cost will vary depending on materials, complexity and the dentist’s training and experience and to some degree the location of the practice.  Insurance may pay part of a crown’s cost if it’s obviously needed for medical reasons, but usually crowns are covered only on a limited basis per year.  Depending on the customers’ needs and wishes, partial and full crowns made of various materials may be utilized.  Crowns are made of gold, porcelain, resin or porcelain-fused-to-non-precious-metal.  A tooth-shaped cap (the crown) covers the entire surface of a tooth, adding strength, durability and stability. This usually requires two office visits; first to prepare the tooth, make an impression and install a temporary crown. The impression is sent to a dental laboratory or manufactured in-house with the use of a CAD aided milling machine to create the permanent crown, which is installed during the second appointment.

There’s often an initial office visit ($65-$102) and X-rays ($85-$135).  One must not forget that there are additional costs that contribute to the overall price involved in crowns, aside from the material and type of crown chosen which are beyond the patient’s control.  A large share of undervalued costs goes toward the treatment itself, lab and production costs for the crown, aftercare and the like.

Dental care on a whole is often considered expensive, but with proper care a crown may last 10 or more years.  Depending upon the general wear and tear a crown is exposed to and how well you keep your teeth free of plaque, it could last indefinitely.  With somewhere between 10 and indefinitely, the investment becomes rather modest, if not inexpensive.

If we can be of service or answer any of your questions please do not hesitate to give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Woodstock: The Difference between Dental and Physician Health Care Costs

Why the cost of your dental care really hasn’t increased that much?  In fact it has either tracked or lagged behind the consumer price index and this is despite all the advances in dental technology.  Compare that observation to your medical care costs.  If you go in to see your dentist and ask for an estimated cost of treatment, 9 times out of 10 you will get a quote.  Try doing that in your physician’s office.   Why?  Because your dental care has been a product of the free market system.  The insurance companies have never yet to invade the purview of your oral health the way they have dominated, if not destroyed your overall health care.

You get your teeth examined, cancer screening, teeth cleaning and x-rays twice a year for less than $300.00.  And that’s about two hours of actual treatment from your dentist and his/her team.  At the physician’s office you go in once a year, see your physician or his PA for about 10 to 16[i] minutes on average and it costs $300 to $900.00, depending on possible immunizations and your blood work (which costs more than twice what an independent lab charges if you have it done outside of your physician’s office).   Physicians are paid by insurance and Medicare submittals based on the procedures they perform and not by the amount of time they spend with you.  So the quicker the visit the more procedures they can bill your insurance.  If they take too long it cost them money, not you.  And all their revenues are based on negotiated fees with your insurance company, not the free market system.  Ah, the key phrase – free market system.  Dentistry never bought into insurance coverage for your treatment and care, and as a result of the free market system there has been a reasonable or to put it better, a withstandable increase to the cost of your oral health care based on the supply and demand curves.

So how much does insurance influence the cost of your health care?  Anecdotally, let me tell you about my daughter’s, but really my experience with health care and why we are the losers in this battle to secure adequate health care treatment at an affordable price.  My daughter had a cyst under her eyelid.  It was not visible to you or me, but it irritated the dickens to her cornea.   I found a specialist and accompanied my daughter to the physician.  It was determined that the treatment required general anesthesia to safely perform the surgery.  When I asked ‘how much’, I received no answer.  I was passed on to the patient coordinator for that physician.  So I asked ‘how much’, and again I received no answer.   They didn’t have a clue what this was going to cost me.  So I immediately said ‘sign me up, I’ll take two’.   Seriously though, they needed my insurance carrier and they would let me know, great.

I get a call from the physician’s office.  It’s going to cost you $800 and change.  Ok, great, and is that my drive out price?  ‘Oh no, that’s just the doctor’s fee.’  Ok, so what else?  I have to call the surgical center.  Ok, how much does that cost?  We [the doctor] don’t know, you just have to call and find out.  So I called.  The gentleman quoted me $1540.00 including 2 hours of facility and the anesthesiologist.  ‘Oh, and you won’t be needing a biopsy, since this is cosmetic.’  No wait, this is not cosmetic, it’s required surgery.  So the gentleman backs up and re-quotes the price.  It will be $4 to 7 thousand for the surgical suite, $1800 & change for the anesthesiologist and X amount of dollars for the biopsy.

Wait, hold on, back up a minute, you just quoted me a price that is almost 7 times what the same procedure would cost if it was elective surgery.  Ah, that key phrase creeps back in to the conversation.  Under a free market system, elective surgery only garners what the market will bear.  But under an insurance based system, physicians don’t know what it costs, so they inflate the costs and hope for some remuneration equal to or in excess of what it really costs under a free market system to treat you.  In other words, it’s a crap-shoot your physician is playing with your health insurance company.   And the loser is you.  So the next time you go to the physician or the dentist, remember why you’re paying what to whom, the physician or your insurance company.  And the next time you discuss health care reform; you’re probably talking about insurance reform.  If we can answer your questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road,

Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

 

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[i] About.com, Trisha Torrey, November 14, 2008.

 

 

Dentist Woodstock – 4 Steps to Promoting Good Oral Health

Good oral hygiene is important for maintaining one’s overall health.  If you believe this and you should, then there are 4 essential guidelines of preventative care to maintaining good oral health, all of which are endorsed by the American Dental Association:

  1. Floss regularly and floss first- It is recommended that individuals floss on a regular basis after meals and before brushing their teeth.  The reason to floss first is to dislodge any food particles trapped in between your teeth, which can be disposed of while brushing.  The proper way to floss is to push the floss gently between your teeth to the gum to loosen debris your toothbrush cannot reach. Initially, you may experience some light bleeding but this should disappear once your gums get used to the flossing process.

 

  1. Brushing your teeth- If you don’t have an electric toothbrush, good brushing by hand should take a minimum of 2 minutes and should involve brushing in a circular motion, which the electric toothbrush does for you.  You work your way from one side of the mouth to the other, keeping in mind to pay attention to certain neglected areas such as the very back teeth and your tongue. Dentists recommend using soft bristle brushes and toothpaste that contain fluoride.  The fluoride is important, because the rise in the consumption of bottled water has led to the population’s decline in fluoride intake.

 

  1. Mouthwash- I am not sure how effective this is, but if you’re not going to brush twice a day, using a mouthwash that contains fluoride at least twice a day is a good preventative measure that kills the bacteria responsible for cavities and gum disease.  Given recent research, you might want to choose a non-alcohol based rinse.

 

  1. Your Dental visits- Maintaining your oral health requires regular dental visits at least every six months.  You need to do this for early detection of potential global health problems that could develop into more serious issues and the hygienist can clean areas that might have been missed or that were resistant to the 3 steps above.

Finally, Finding a Dentist that is Right for You

Research shows that your dental care is an important aspect of your overall general health care.  So you need to make sure you find a dentist that is right for you. This can be a difficult process.  Look for someone who’s competent and you feel comfortable with, one you can have a collaborative relationship with. This is important because there are conditions and problems that were not discussed in this article that the dentist will need to pay attention to during your regular checkups. Hopefully after reading this article, you will have a better understanding of the basics for good oral health.   I you have questions or concerns feel free to contact or call.

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road,

Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

 

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Dentist Woodstock: How much do dental implants cost?

If you are trying to figure out the ins and outs of  implants verses the older more conventional methods of tooth replacement, the cost of dental implantsat first blush may appear high, and therefore, unaffordable to most people.  But appearances can be deceiving if you examine the beneficial differences and the time involved by your specialist.  While I have written on those issues before, let’s explore other aspects of price and how different dental implants may differ very significantly depending on different factors.

The real concern for the patient is ‘where and how’ to find a low cost quality dental implant, and is most likely the driven adjective ‘low cost’ a result of the perception by the patient that teeth are utilitarian to their daily life.  That’s really not the case, but to put the cost into perspective, all the while considering that your teeth aren’t really as appreciated as much as they should be, let’s examine what goes into the cost of a dental implant.

4 Factors that Drive the Cost of Dental Implants:

The Material: The traditional materials – prices of cobalt-chromium alloy and titanium are not the same.  Implants from cobalt-chromium (CC) alloy rods are cheaper than comparable titanium implants, but when it comes to zirconium dioxide, then cost of a dental implant may appear to be cost prohibitive to the patient.  But, depending on where the implant is being placed, you may end up with a less than satisfactory result with the less expensive CC implant.

The Size: This case is a significant factor.  The bigger the implant, the more material, the more it costs, but also the more it may do.  Also, special coatings applied to the surface of the implant, contribute to better osseo-integration with the bone, will affect the cost of the dental implant.

The Manufacturer: Different manufacturers put different prices on similar rods made from the same material. Some manufacturers include some kind of an extra charge in the dental implant’s price for their brand name. This is a lot more esoteric and therefore harder to explain.   It’s like trying to explain the difference between Polo and Hanes T-shirts.

Finally, it may depend on where your dentist gets his implants from.  And this factor may be a function of how motivated your provider is in providing you with the best implant material for the least amount of cost to you.  Some of that may just end up being economies of scale by your provider.  Does your provider have contacts directly with manufactures in China or Israel, where the dental implant cost can be significantly reduced, while the indirect purchase of dental implants from U.S dental suppliers may ratchet up the price?

If the price is too good to be true?

The cost of an dental implant starts from around $1,500 up to $5,000.00 .  Anything less may be an indicator that you’re getting an inferior product or one not designed for a particular location in your mouth.  (Mini-plants, which I have discussed before, are the exception to the rule.)  Short term the implant device may appear to be fully functional.  But if we look at the cost and the cost of other materials for dental implants compared to their operational life, the difference may be likened to the difference between Toyo’s and Michelin tires.  Here again you may get what you pay for and the initial cost may appear affordable, but in the  long term you are going to get a better result with respect to how it functions and how long it lasts if your provider installs Michelins.

A lot of your choice and cost may depend on the choice of your provider.   It’s not to say the more you spend the better you will be.  Rather, a reputable practitioner, who is truly trained in the placement and restoration (and this may be two providers), may be a significant factor in what you end up with and what it costs.  Trust and reputation are the more difficult factors to define for the patient.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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