Dentist Woodstock: How Much do Dental Crowns Cost?

Dental crowns cost anywhere between $900.00 and $1500.00 each depending on the tooth to being restored. In addition, the cost will vary depending on materials, complexity and the dentist’s training and experience and to some degree the location of the practice.  Insurance may pay part of a crown’s cost if it’s obviously needed for medical reasons, but usually crowns are covered only on a limited basis per year.  Depending on the customers’ needs and wishes, partial and full crowns made of various materials may be utilized.  Crowns are made of gold, porcelain, resin or porcelain-fused-to-non-precious-metal.  A tooth-shaped cap (the crown) covers the entire surface of a tooth, adding strength, durability and stability. This usually requires two office visits; first to prepare the tooth, make an impression and install a temporary crown. The impression is sent to a dental laboratory or manufactured in-house with the use of a CAD aided milling machine to create the permanent crown, which is installed during the second appointment.

There’s often an initial office visit ($65-$102) and X-rays ($85-$135).  One must not forget that there are additional costs that contribute to the overall price involved in crowns, aside from the material and type of crown chosen which are beyond the patient’s control.  A large share of undervalued costs goes toward the treatment itself, lab and production costs for the crown, aftercare and the like.

Dental care on a whole is often considered expensive, but with proper care a crown may last 10 or more years.  Depending upon the general wear and tear a crown is exposed to and how well you keep your teeth free of plaque, it could last indefinitely.  With somewhere between 10 and indefinitely, the investment becomes rather modest, if not inexpensive.

If we can be of service or answer any of your questions please do not hesitate to give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist serving Woodstock: Mouthwash and Oral Cancer

There appears to be controversy with respect to whether or not mouthwash containing alcohol may be related to oral cancer.  This controversy arises out the studies that show a link between oral cancer and those that drink alcohol.  Michael Douglas is the most recent case in point.  He has been reported to be a heavy smoker and imbibe alcohol on what is rumored to be on frequent occasions.  The obvious link in theory is that most mouthwash formulas contain alcohol, so the conclusion is that a link to mouthwash must exist here also.  The problem is there are no conclusive studies and at this time there appears to be insufficient evidence to alter the ADA’s approval of mouthwash containing alcohol as an effective method for the prevention and reduction of gingivitis and plaque above the gumline when used as directed.  The ADA Council on Scientific Affairs awarded the ADA Seal of Acceptance to these products after a thorough review of data on their safety and effectiveness.

Of all the studies published on this topic, beginning in 1979, four studies reported some positive results while five found no association. (citations omitted)  What we know is that none of the criteria for causality have been fulfilled by the studies that have been published so far.  The International Agency for Research on Cancer, an extension of the World Health Organization, now identifies the consumption of ethanol in alcoholic beverages as a carcinogenic risk.[1] Alcohol abuse is associated with cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx and esophagus. Ibid.  However, the reason for this association is not fully understood – it may be due to a direct effect of alcohol on these tissue.[2]  Because of the conflicting studies and endorsements I could advise you to keep using alcohol formulated mouth rinses.  But if you are concerned and wish to stay on the safe side of the debate, there are non-alcohol based mouth rinses available that appear to be effective in the prevention of gingivitis and plaque.

Our job is to try and educate you on the contemporary issues we face in addressing your oral health and if there are any questions you would like to pose, please feel free to contact us for a free consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

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[1] International Agency for Research on Cancer. IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Volume 96. Alcoholic beverage consumption and ethyl carbamate (urethane). Lyon, France: 6-13 February 2007.

[2] Lachenmeier DW. Safety evaluation of topical applications of ethanol on the skin and inside the oral cavity. J Occup Med Toxicol 2008;3:26.

Dentist Woodstock: The Mercury Filling Controversy

 

Deutsch: Amalgamfüllung Español: Ejemplo de Am...
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Whenever I hear a patient ask about amalgam restorations (usually referred to as mercury fillings), I wonder why this question refuses to go away.  For decades, amalgams have been considered the primary restorative material for posterior teeth (the ones in the back) because of their long time success.  After enormous amounts of study the World Health Organization, the FDI World Dental Federation, and the American Dental Association continue to endorse the use of amalgam to restore teeth.   Yet it continues to be demonized by the public, in particular in urban legends over the internet.

As a result the trend is towards the less and less use of amalgams and the greater use of composite resins to restore posterior teeth.  One of our consultants, Tom Limoli of Limoli and Associates notes that US third-party payment data reflects that 65% of direct posterior restorations last year were resin-based composite, while 35% were amalgam.  So regardless of the empirical evidence to the contrary, the patient pool is demanding composite restorations.

Every dentist will need an alternative material to use in the restoration of posterior teeth as this trend continues.  The challenge for the dentist is that composite resins only have a life expectancy of 5 to 8 years.  Given the patient’s desire to be rid of the potential or theoretical health hazards that have been formulated in recent years, amalgam restorations will ultimately be eliminated by the slow and natural death of attrition.  While amalgam has been the material of choice for decades and still remains the primary source of teaching in dental schools today, it may not be in the future.  Given the patient demand for composite restorations and what appears to be the dentist’s propensity to capitulate, we are going to need a better solution to posterior restorations if we want to achieve the same longevity that is achieved through amalgam restorations.

The internet has continued to create an uncertainty on the part of the lay public about amalgams similar to the controversy that surrounds cell phones and brain tumors.  It is interesting to note the dilemma faced by dentists today, when we know that amalgam is the better choice for the restoration, but the popular demand or path of least resistance is a composite restoration.  This disconnect creates some interesting food for thought.[1]

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200 

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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[1]Additional sources of information came from Gordon J. Christensen, DDS, James F. Simon, DDS, and Howard E. Strassler, DMD. Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry, July/August, 2011.

Dentist Woodstock: Top 4 Reasons Not to play hooky from Your Dental Cleanings

woodstock dentist near meSure, regular cleanings with our office promotes good oral hygiene, but did you know these visits also screen for a multitude of diseases? Getting your teeth cleaned and having your doctor’s exam may not rank up there with an afternoon on the course or ditching work to enjoy a matinee, but it may be well worth it for your overall health. Here are 4 really great reasons to see your dentist for your regularly scheduled cleanings.

  1. It’s an opportunity to check for Oral Cancer. You may or may not realize that you’re screened for oral cancer during your regular dental cleaning but you are. According to the Oral Cancer Foundation, an American dies of oral cancer every hour of every day. It’s a sad proposition, especially when you consider that it is highly curable with early diagnosis.
  2. Your gums are being checked for Gum Disease. Gum disease, or an infection in the gum tissues and bone that keep your teeth in place, is one of the leading causes of adult tooth loss. It can be treated and reversed if diagnosed early. Unfortunately, not receiving treatment will lead to a more serious and advanced state of gum disease. Regular cleanings and check-ups along with daily brushing and flossing are key defenses against gum disease.
  3. Your overall health. Studies have linked heart attacks, diabetes detection and strokes to gum disease associated with poor oral hygiene.  A trip to your dentist at least every 6 months and in some cases more often, could reduce your risk of other serious health issues.
  4. Early detection of Dental Problems. We’ve already touched upon early detection of gum disease and oral cancer, but don’t overlook more basic dental problems. Cavities and broken fillings are easy to treat. Without regular check-ups, undetected problems can lead to more serious issues like root canals, gum surgery and tooth extraction.   An ounce of prevention verses a pound of cure.

So you haven’t been keeping up with what current research has to say about caring for your teeth.  That’s why check-ups allow your dentist to examine your mouth and keep you on the right path.  If it’s been more than 6 months since your last check up and cleaning, call your dentist to schedule an appointment today.  If we can be of any help or answer any questions please feel free to drop us a line.

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Woodstock: Towne Lake: 8 Windows your overall health sees through dentistry.

I read this article the other day by the Mayo Clinic staff and it appears very much worth republishing.  Please read this and adjust your life accordingly.  It’s really not that difficult to lead a healthy life style and live longer lives.

Oral health: A window to your overall health

Your oral health is more important than you may realize. Get the facts about how the health of your mouth, teeth and gums may affect your general health.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Did you know that your oral health can offer clues about your overall health? Or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Understand the intimate connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.

What’s the connection between oral health and overall health?

Your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless. Normally the body’s natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, harmful bacteria can sometimes grow out of control and cause oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease. In addition, dental procedures, medications, or treatments that reduce saliva flow, disrupt the normal balance of bacteria in your mouth or breach the mouth’s normal protective barriers may make it easier for bacteria to enter your bloodstream.

What conditions may be linked to oral health?

Your oral health may affect, be affected by or contribute to various diseases and conditions, including:

  • Endocarditis. Gum disease and dental procedures that cut your gums may allow bacteria to enter your bloodstream. If you have a weak immune system or a damaged heart valve, this can cause infection in other parts of the body — such as an infection of the inner lining of the heart (endocarditis).
  • Cardiovascular disease. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke may be linked to oral bacteria, possibly due to chronic inflammation from periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Gum disease has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes reduces the body’s resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk. In addition, people who have inadequate blood sugar control may develop more-frequent and severe infections of the gums and the bone that holds teeth in place, and they may lose more teeth than do people who have good blood sugar control.
  • HIV/AIDS. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.
  • Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — may be associated with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.
  • Alzheimer’s disease. Tooth loss before age 35 may be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Other conditions. Other conditions that may be linked to oral health include Sjogren’s syndrome — an immune system disorder — and eating disorders.

Be sure to tell your dentist if you’re taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you’ve had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition.

How can I protect my oral health?

To protect your oral health, resolve to practice good oral hygiene every day. For example:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three to four months.
  • Floss daily.
  • Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Schedule regular dental checkups.

Also, watch for signs and symptoms of oral disease and contact your dentist as soon as a problem arises. Remember, taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health. Pasted from <http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dental/DE00001/NSECTIONGROUP=2>

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Woodstock: The Difference between Dental and Physician Health Care Costs

Why the cost of your dental care really hasn’t increased that much?  In fact it has either tracked or lagged behind the consumer price index and this is despite all the advances in dental technology.  Compare that observation to your medical care costs.  If you go in to see your dentist and ask for an estimated cost of treatment, 9 times out of 10 you will get a quote.  Try doing that in your physician’s office.   Why?  Because your dental care has been a product of the free market system.  The insurance companies have never yet to invade the purview of your oral health the way they have dominated, if not destroyed your overall health care.

You get your teeth examined, cancer screening, teeth cleaning and x-rays twice a year for less than $300.00.  And that’s about two hours of actual treatment from your dentist and his/her team.  At the physician’s office you go in once a year, see your physician or his PA for about 10 to 16[i] minutes on average and it costs $300 to $900.00, depending on possible immunizations and your blood work (which costs more than twice what an independent lab charges if you have it done outside of your physician’s office).   Physicians are paid by insurance and Medicare submittals based on the procedures they perform and not by the amount of time they spend with you.  So the quicker the visit the more procedures they can bill your insurance.  If they take too long it cost them money, not you.  And all their revenues are based on negotiated fees with your insurance company, not the free market system.  Ah, the key phrase – free market system.  Dentistry never bought into insurance coverage for your treatment and care, and as a result of the free market system there has been a reasonable or to put it better, a withstandable increase to the cost of your oral health care based on the supply and demand curves.

So how much does insurance influence the cost of your health care?  Anecdotally, let me tell you about my daughter’s, but really my experience with health care and why we are the losers in this battle to secure adequate health care treatment at an affordable price.  My daughter had a cyst under her eyelid.  It was not visible to you or me, but it irritated the dickens to her cornea.   I found a specialist and accompanied my daughter to the physician.  It was determined that the treatment required general anesthesia to safely perform the surgery.  When I asked ‘how much’, I received no answer.  I was passed on to the patient coordinator for that physician.  So I asked ‘how much’, and again I received no answer.   They didn’t have a clue what this was going to cost me.  So I immediately said ‘sign me up, I’ll take two’.   Seriously though, they needed my insurance carrier and they would let me know, great.

I get a call from the physician’s office.  It’s going to cost you $800 and change.  Ok, great, and is that my drive out price?  ‘Oh no, that’s just the doctor’s fee.’  Ok, so what else?  I have to call the surgical center.  Ok, how much does that cost?  We [the doctor] don’t know, you just have to call and find out.  So I called.  The gentleman quoted me $1540.00 including 2 hours of facility and the anesthesiologist.  ‘Oh, and you won’t be needing a biopsy, since this is cosmetic.’  No wait, this is not cosmetic, it’s required surgery.  So the gentleman backs up and re-quotes the price.  It will be $4 to 7 thousand for the surgical suite, $1800 & change for the anesthesiologist and X amount of dollars for the biopsy.

Wait, hold on, back up a minute, you just quoted me a price that is almost 7 times what the same procedure would cost if it was elective surgery.  Ah, that key phrase creeps back in to the conversation.  Under a free market system, elective surgery only garners what the market will bear.  But under an insurance based system, physicians don’t know what it costs, so they inflate the costs and hope for some remuneration equal to or in excess of what it really costs under a free market system to treat you.  In other words, it’s a crap-shoot your physician is playing with your health insurance company.   And the loser is you.  So the next time you go to the physician or the dentist, remember why you’re paying what to whom, the physician or your insurance company.  And the next time you discuss health care reform; you’re probably talking about insurance reform.  If we can answer your questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road,

Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

 

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[i] About.com, Trisha Torrey, November 14, 2008.

 

 

Dentist Woodstock – 4 Steps to Promoting Good Oral Health

Good oral hygiene is important for maintaining one’s overall health.  If you believe this and you should, then there are 4 essential guidelines of preventative care to maintaining good oral health, all of which are endorsed by the American Dental Association:

  1. Floss regularly and floss first- It is recommended that individuals floss on a regular basis after meals and before brushing their teeth.  The reason to floss first is to dislodge any food particles trapped in between your teeth, which can be disposed of while brushing.  The proper way to floss is to push the floss gently between your teeth to the gum to loosen debris your toothbrush cannot reach. Initially, you may experience some light bleeding but this should disappear once your gums get used to the flossing process.

 

  1. Brushing your teeth- If you don’t have an electric toothbrush, good brushing by hand should take a minimum of 2 minutes and should involve brushing in a circular motion, which the electric toothbrush does for you.  You work your way from one side of the mouth to the other, keeping in mind to pay attention to certain neglected areas such as the very back teeth and your tongue. Dentists recommend using soft bristle brushes and toothpaste that contain fluoride.  The fluoride is important, because the rise in the consumption of bottled water has led to the population’s decline in fluoride intake.

 

  1. Mouthwash- I am not sure how effective this is, but if you’re not going to brush twice a day, using a mouthwash that contains fluoride at least twice a day is a good preventative measure that kills the bacteria responsible for cavities and gum disease.  Given recent research, you might want to choose a non-alcohol based rinse.

 

  1. Your Dental visits- Maintaining your oral health requires regular dental visits at least every six months.  You need to do this for early detection of potential global health problems that could develop into more serious issues and the hygienist can clean areas that might have been missed or that were resistant to the 3 steps above.

Finally, Finding a Dentist that is Right for You

Research shows that your dental care is an important aspect of your overall general health care.  So you need to make sure you find a dentist that is right for you. This can be a difficult process.  Look for someone who’s competent and you feel comfortable with, one you can have a collaborative relationship with. This is important because there are conditions and problems that were not discussed in this article that the dentist will need to pay attention to during your regular checkups. Hopefully after reading this article, you will have a better understanding of the basics for good oral health.   I you have questions or concerns feel free to contact or call.

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road,

Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

 

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Dentist Woodstock – Arthritis got you down?

Brushing your teeth, buttoning your shirt, or opening a child proof bottle are all routine daily activities that most people take for granted.  But if you have arthritis and it affects your hands, performing these and other basic tasks can be challenging, if not impossible. Theoretically, “exercising” your hands should reduce the pain, improve your range of motion, and, ultimately, enable you to perform more easily the various tasks of daily living.  However, early in the morning use of your hands may aggravate your situation.

                                                                            

Arthritis of the hands manifests differently depending on what kind of arthritis you have.  Osteoarthritis, which is the most common cause of hand arthritis, involves the protective cartilage that covers the ends of your bones and its gradual deteriorates is due to wear and tear or, in some cases, to injury. If your hand pain is caused by osteoarthritis there’s a high probability that flossing and brushing your teeth may be affected.

 

By contrast, rheumatoid arthritis, sometimes referred to as RA, is an immune system disorder that damages the cells in the tissue that lines and lubricates the joints in your hand.  If rheumatoid arthritis is the cause of your hand pain, the distinction between osteoarthritis – and rheumatoid arthritis -induced hand pain is important for several reasons*:

 

First, if your pain is caused by rheumatoid, you should not attempt to alleviate it with exercise alone. So the exercise associated with brushing your teeth could exacerbate your joint problems.  Second, strengthening exercises can be harmful if performed aggressively and should be done in moderation by people with rheumatoid arthritis.  Third, you should perform any type of exercise with caution while you’re having a flare up of the joints.

 

So that your oral health does not suffer due to the deterioration and pain associated with either arthritis I would suggest the purchase an electric toothbrush.  My preference is the Oral-B, but it really doesn’t matter which one you use, you just need to use one.  Regardless of your condition, my experience with patients who use the Oral-B regularly has shown results in the positive care of their oral health.  With respect to flossing, which is just as important in maintaining your oral hygiene, you may need to increase the number of visits to the dentist to clean your teeth where you can’t otherwise preform the task.  If you discuss this with your dentist, you should be able to make arrangements just to have your teeth cleaned on alternating appointments and forego unnecessary exam fees. Interestingly enough, there is a possibility that the prescription by your physician may afford you insurance coverage for the extra visits.   As a side note, if you utilize a health savings account, you certainly should be about to cover the costs of all your visits with pre-tax health dollars.  If there is anything we can do to assist you, please do not hesitate to contact us.

 

*This information is not intended to substitute for the advice of a physician. Some of this information was provided by Johns Hopkins website on arthritis. (http://www.johnshopkinshealthalerts.com).

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road

Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

 

 

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Dentist Woodstock: Sinusitis Got You Down?

Winter is getting cranked up and we need to take measures to maintain our health because during the winter months and at other times when the air is very dry, it is important to keep our nasal passages moist. When I was young I used to think my mother’s practice of medicine was just one more of her old wives tales, but practically applied her easy way to moisten your nasal passages is to sniff salt solution into both sides of the nose 2-4 times a day seems to work. To prepare a solution of proper strength, add 1/4 teaspoon of table salt to a cup of warm water, and stir it until all the salt has dissolved. Sniff some from a spoon or other small container into each nostril. Alternatively, you can buy ready-prepared nasal saline products, such as Ocean, Simply Saline or generic equivalents from drug stores. Such solutions can be used to wash away mucus from the membranous lining of the nasal passages. They also help by shrinking any parts of it that are swollen. This may save you a trip to the doctor.  If this is not done, mucus and the swollen membranes around these openings may block openings of the sinuses into the nasal passages. Sinusitis will then occur if nasal bacteria infect the mucus, which can no longer drain from the blocked sinus. Treatment of sinusitis (rather than its prevention) often requires the use of antibiotics.

Some doctors are not enthusiastic about nasal saline irrigation since researchers found that it does not significantly reduce the incidence of colds. Personally, I am a little skeptical about a doctor’s hesitation to try a home remedy rather than popping a few pills. I don’t mean to confuse colds with sinusitis. Viruses cause colds, while sinusitis is a bacterial-induced complication for some colds. Irrigation of the nasal passages with saline cannot kill viruses or bacteria, but according to my favorite ENT patient, it can help to reduce the incidence of sinusitis in people with a tendency to develop this common complication of colds.

Part of the source for this article came from my mom and part from the American Family Physician (70:1685 & 1697, “04) & Wall Street Journal (Dec.7″04, page D6).

Novy Scheinfeld DDS PC 5471 Bells Ferry Road

Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281 info@rightsmilecenter.com http://www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

Acworth Dentist: I read this on Webmd.com

…. and thought it was a very practical approach to your dental care:

 

Your Oral Health Care Plan

Good oral health involves more than just brushing. To keep your teeth and mouth healthy for a lifetime of use, there are steps that you should follow. Here’s what you should consider:

1. Understand your own oral health needs.

Talk with your dentist, other oral health care specialist, or hygienist about any special conditions in your mouth and any ways in which your medical/health conditions affect your teeth or oral health. For example, cancer treatments, pregnancy, heart diseases, diabetes, dental appliances (dentures, braces) can all impact your oral health and may necessitate a change in the care of your mouth and/or teeth. Be sure to tell your dentist if you have experienced a change in your general health or in any medications you are taking since your last dental visit.

2. Develop, then follow, a daily oral health routine.

Based on discussions with your dentist, other oral health care specialist, and hygienist and considering your unique general health and oral health situations, develop an oral health routine that is easy to follow on a daily basis. For example, people with special conditions – such as pregnancy, diabetes and other underlying diseases, orthodontic appliances – may require additional instruction and perhaps treatments to keep their mouth healthy. Make sure you understand the additional care and/or treatment that is needed, commit to the extra tasks, and work them into your daily health routine.

3. Use fluoride.

Children and adults benefit from fluoride use. Fluoride strengthens developing teeth in children and prevents tooth decay in both children and adults. Toothpastes and mouth rinses contain fluoride. Fluoride levels in tap water may not be high enough without supplementation to prevent tooth decay. Contact your water utility to determine the level for your area. Talk with your dentist about your fluoride needs. Ask if fluoride supplements or a higher strength, prescription-only fluoride product is necessary for you.

4. Brush and floss daily.

Brush your teeth at least twice a day (morning and before bed time) and floss at least once a day. Better still would be to brush after every meal and snack. These activities remove plaque, which if not removed, combines with sugars to form acids that lead to tooth decay. Bacterial plaque also causes gum disease and other periodontal diseases.

5. Eat a balanced diet and limit snacking.

Eat a variety of foods, but eat fewer foods that contain sugars and starches (for example, cookies, cakes, pies, candies, ice cream, dried fruits and raisins, soft drinks, potato chips). These foods produce the most acids in the mouth, which begin the decay process. If you must snack, brush your teeth afterward or chew sugarless gum.

6. If you use tobacco products, quit.

Smoking cigarettes or using smokeless tobacco products increases your risk of oral cancer and cancers of the larynx, pharynx and esophagus; gum disease; as well as causes bad breath, tooth discoloration, and contribute to other oral and general health problems.

7. Examine your mouth regularly.

Become familiar with the appearance of your own mouth and teeth through frequent examination. This way, you will be able to catch any changes at an early stage and have these changes examined by a dentist. Look for the development of any spots, lesions, cuts, swellings, or growths on your gums, tongue, cheeks, inside of your lips, and floor and roof of your mouth. Examine your teeth for any signs of chipping or cracking, discoloration, and looseness. If you experience a change in your bite or develop pain, call your dentist as soon as possible. An oral examination is particularly important to conduct if you are a tobacco user, since you are at an increased risk of developing oral cancer.

8. Visit your dentist regularly.

The standard recommendation is to visit your dentist twice a year for check-ups and cleanings. Talk with your dentist about the frequency that is best for you considering your oral health situation.

9. Develop a partnership with your dentist.

Don’t be afraid to ask your dentist for more information if you don’t understand a treatment or procedure. You should be able to have a free and frank discussion with your dentist about the following types of issues:

  • What are the treatment options for a particular dental condition?
  • How do these options differ in cost and in their durability?
  • Do all the options solve the problem? What are the benefits and drawbacks of each option?
  • Of the dental treatments being recommended, which are absolutely necessary, which are less urgent, which are elective, and which are merely cosmetic?
  • What are the consequences of delaying treatment?
  • How much will the treatment cost?
  • When is payment due?
  • What method of payment does your dentist expect?
  • Do you have a clear understanding of all fees and methods and schedules of payment?

Novy Scheinfeld DDS PC 5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmileacworth.com

info@rightsmilecenter.comFurther Reading:

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