Dentist Near Me: How much do dental fillings cost?

dentist near me

The cost of a filling can vary greatly, depending on who you go to, the type of filling and degree of restoration required.  

One of the ways to find out the actual range of cost is to just call a local dentist from the internet and ask them.  But you are going to find some hesitancy to quote over the phone because each person presents a different set of restorative circumstances, but you should be able to get a range of costs or a free consultation.

While costs vary from one area to the next and from one office to the next, the cost of typical amalgam filling ranges from approximately $75 to $175 per filling, whereas a composite resin filling ranges from $125 to $300 for a single surface restoration.  You should expect about 3 to five years (possibly 7 years) of use from the composite and as many as 20 years or longer from an amalgam restoration.  Actually a well-cared-for amalgam filling can last a lifetime, so the expensiveness of the filling really becomes a minor consideration.

Restorative circumstances are going to vary from tooth to tooth and decay may be found in one small spot or throughout a tooth. The restorative fees are based on the number of surfaces needing filling in a single tooth.  A silver amalgam filling on one or two surfaces averages $75 to $175, while for three or more surfaces it could go as high as $120 to $300 or more.  The same type of logic follows with respect to composite restorations.  Since composite resin fillings are more time consuming and require greater skills to completion they are more expensive than amalgam fillings and weigh in on the more expensive side of caries restorations.

Typically dental insurance covers most or all of the costs of a silver amalgam filling, but only 50 to 80 percent of the cost of a composite filling because the higher charge for the tooth-colored material is considered a cosmetic option. One exception is when an old amalgam filling is cracked or broken and is replaced with a composite filling.

Your dentist should be advising you of the type of filling based on the size of the cavity and the location of the tooth in your mouth.  Amalgams are more likely to be placed in the back of your mouth while composites are more likely to be used on more-visible front teeth. WebMD.com gives an overview of typical filling procedures and Colgate.com lists pros and cons of different types of fillings.

Amalgam Advantages

  • Amalgam fillings are strong and can withstand the forces of chewing.
  • They are relatively inexpensive and last a long time, compared with alternatives.
  • An amalgam filling is completed in one dental visit.

Amalgam Disadvantages

  • Amalgam doesn’t match the color of your teeth.
  • Healthy parts of your tooth often must be removed to make a space large enough to hold an amalgam filling.
  • Amalgam fillings can corrode or tarnish over time, causing discoloration where the filling meets the tooth.
  • A traditional amalgam filling does not bond (stick) to your tooth, so the cavity preparation developed by your dentist requires undercuts or ledges to provide retention of the filling.  Your dentist may have to remove additional tooth structure to establish good retention for the filling.  
  • Some people may be allergic to mercury or be concerned about its effects, although research shows the amount of mercury exposure from fillings is similar to what people get from other sources in the environment.

Composite Advantages

  • Your fillings will match the color of your teeth and therefore undetectable.
  • A filling should be completed in one dental visit.
  • Composite fillings can bond directly to the tooth, making the tooth stronger than it would be with an amalgam filling.
  • Less drilling is involved than with amalgam fillings because your dentist does not have to shape the space as much to hold the filling securely.  The bonding process holds the composite resin in the tooth.
  • Indirect composite fillings are heat and light cured increasing their strength.
  • Composite resin can be used in combination with other materials, such as glass ionomer, to provide the benefits of both materials.

Composite Disadvantages

  • Although composite resins have become stronger and more resistant to wear, they generally don’t last as long as amalgam fillings under the pressure of chewing.
  • The composite may shrink when placed; this can lead to more cavities in the future in areas where the filling is not making good contact with your tooth.
  • This restoration takes more time and skill to place because they are usually placed in layers. The increased time and labor involved also contribute to the higher cost (compared with amalgam fillings).
  • Indirect fillings and inlays take at least two visits to complete. Your dentist takes impressions at the first visit and places the filling or inlay at the second visit.
  • In large restorations, composites may not last as long as amalgam fillings.

The trick is to find a qualified, well trained dentist, and that requires you to educate yourself about the dentist you choose and a basic knowledge about dentistry.  If we can be of service or answer any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Rd

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Chamblee Dentist: How much do dental fillings cost? and Why?

The cost of a filling can vary greatly, depending on who you go to, the type of filling and degree of restoration required.  Chamblee Dentist near me An amalgam (mercury filling) is cheaper than a composite (white/resin filling), but will last significantly longer if you are unconcerned about aesthetics and the back and forth debate over whether or not amalgams may be linked to other health issues.  The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Dental Association (ADA) found there is no danger from an amalgam filling, but some specialists and consumers remain unconvinced by the findings.

One of the ways to find out the actual range of cost is to just call a local dentist from the internet and ask them.  You are going to find some hesitancy to quote over the phone because each person presents a different set of restorative circumstances, but you should be able to get a range of costs or a free consultation.

While costs vary from one area to the next and from one office to the next, the cost of typical amalgam filling ranges from approximately $75 to $175 per filling, whereas a composite resin filling ranges from $125 to $300 for a single surface restoration.  You should expect about 3 to five years (possibly 7 years) of use from the composite and as many as 20 years or longer from an amalgam restoration.  Actually a well-cared-for amalgam filling can last a lifetime, so the expensiveness of the filling really becomes a minor consideration.

Restorative circumstances are going to vary from tooth to tooth and decay may be found in one small spot or throughout a tooth. The restorative fees are based on the number of surfaces needing filling in a single tooth.  A silver amalgam filling on one or two surfaces averages $75 to $175, while for three or more surfaces it could go as high as $120 to $300 or more.  The same type of logic follows with respect to composite restorations.  Since composite resin fillings are more time consuming and require greater skills to completion they are more expensive than amalgam fillings and weigh in on the more expensive side of caries restorations.

Typically dental insurance covers most or all of the costs of a silver amalgam filling, but only 50 to 80 percent of the cost of a composite filling because the higher charge for the tooth-colored material is considered a cosmetic option. One exception is when an old amalgam filling is cracked or broken and is replaced with a composite filling.

Your dentist should be advising you of the type of filling based on the size of the cavity and the location of the tooth in your mouth.  Amalgams are more likely to be placed in the back of your mouth while composites are more likely to be used on more-visible front teeth. WebMD.com gives an overview of typical filling procedures and Colgate.com lists pros and cons of different types of fillings.

Amalgam Advantages

  • Amalgam fillings are strong and can withstand the forces of chewing.
  • They are relatively inexpensive and last a long time, compared with alternatives.
  • An amalgam filling is completed in one dental visit.

Amalgam Disadvantages

  • Amalgam doesn’t match the color of your teeth.
  • Healthy parts of your tooth often must be removed to make a space large enough to hold an amalgam filling.
  • Amalgam fillings can corrode or tarnish over time, causing discoloration where the filling meets the tooth.
  • A traditional amalgam filling does not bond (stick) to your tooth, so the cavity preparation developed by your dentist requires undercuts or ledges to provide retention of the filling.  Your dentist may have to remove additional tooth structure to establish good retention for the filling.  
  • Some people may be allergic to mercury or be concerned about its effects, although research shows the amount of mercury exposure from fillings is similar to what people get from other sources in the environment.

Composite Advantages

  • Your fillings will match the color of your teeth and therefore undetectable.
  • A filling should be completed in one dental visit.
  • Composite fillings can bond directly to the tooth, making the tooth stronger than it would be with an amalgam filling.
  • Less drilling is involved than with amalgam fillings because your dentist does not have to shape the space as much to hold the filling securely.  The bonding process holds the composite resin in the tooth.
  • Indirect composite fillings are heat and light cured increasing their strength.
  • Composite resin can be used in combination with other materials, such as glass ionomer, to provide the benefits of both materials.

Composite Disadvantages

  • Although composite resins have become stronger and more resistant to wear, they generally don’t last as long as amalgam fillings under the pressure of chewing.
  • The composite may shrink when placed; this can lead to more cavities in the future in areas where the filling is not making good contact with your tooth.
  • This restoration takes more time and skill to place because they are usually placed in layers. The increased time and labor involved also contribute to the higher cost (compared with amalgam fillings).
  • Indirect fillings and inlays take at least two visits to complete. Your dentist takes impressions at the first visit and places the filling or inlay at the second visit.
  • In large restorations, composites may not last as long as amalgam fillings.

The trick is to find a qualified, well trained dentist, and that requires you to educate yourself about the dentist you choose and a basic knowledge about dentistry.  If we can be of service or answer any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Dentist Dunwoody: What Discolors Teeth?

Porcelain VeneersTooth discoloration and staining can cause embarrassment and self-consciousness.  There are many causes of tooth discoloration, some within your control and some not.  Here is a short list of some causes and possible cures:

1.   Drinks: Coffee and tea tend to stain teeth, especially when sipped over a prolonged period of time.  Periodic professional cleanings and in-office tooth whitening will reverse these effects.

2.  Smoking/Tobacco:  Smoking and chewing tobacco have a negative effect on tooth color, gingival health, and breath.  The best treatment is to quit smoking.  Again, periodic in-office cleanings and professional tooth whitening can minimize the discoloring effects of smoking.

3.  Dental Restorations: Metal restorations tend to breakdown at the edges (margins) and may reduce the transparency of tooth enamel.  For a nice aesthetic appearance, replacing metal fillings with tooth colored composites or porcelains reverses these effects.  Even tooth-colored restorations are subject to stains with time and may need replacement.

4.   Age: As we get older there is a cumulative effect of tooth staining.  The outer tooth enamel wears down with time, causing teeth to turn yellow.  Porcelain veneers or dental bonding can replace the worn layer and restore that once lost youthful smile.  In some cases, tooth whitening may be an appropriate solution.

5.  Chemicals and Medications:  During the tooth development of a child, certain antibiotics such as tetracycline or excessive ingestion of fluoride can cause permanent tooth staining.  Though these stains cannot be cleaned or whitened, porcelain veneers or composite bonding can give the stained teeth a new look.

In addition to the causes listed above, trauma and genetics play a role in changing tooth color. Keep your teeth whiter and brighter by regular dental cleanings (which usually include stain removal and polishing) and ask us about our cosmetic options to get that right smile.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200B

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Thank you for all your referrals.  We truly appreciate them.

Information included is not dental or medical advice.  For your specific information

 be sure to consult your dentist.

 

Related articles

Dentist Alpharetta: How much do Veneers Cost?

Porcelain VeneersSo how much do dental veneers really cost? The cost for porcelain veneers varies widely. They can run anywhere from $925 to $2,500 per tooth. There are several reasons for the difference in cost and it also varies widely across the United States.  And yes, one might consider veneers to be quite expensive but they do offer several benefits.  One of which is a distinctly improved smile.

First, lets discuss what porcelain veneers are.  Porcelain veneers are extremely thin custom made covers for the front surface of the teeth. They can be made from porcelain or direct composite resin.  Although porcelain veneers are more expensive than composite, they last much longer and are more stain resistant.  Traditional composite veneers last on average between five and seven years while porcelain veneers last between 10 and 18 years.

Veneers are used for a variety of purposes. They can be used to fix chipped or broken teeth or teeth that have become discolored by root canal work, excessive fluoride, or drugs such as tetracycline. Porcelain veneers can also be used to correct misaligned teeth or teeth with gaps between them.  But the most common reason for veneers is cosmetic. They can be used to change the length, shape, size and color of teeth. In effect, they can be used to create a designer smile.

There is also a difference in cost between having the procedure done in a metropolitan area versus a small town. Another cost variation is the difference in cost from one ceramics lab to the next. The number of veneers done also affects cost. A single veneer usually is more expensive per tooth than a set of veneers.

Because veneers are considered a cosmetic procedure, they generally are not covered by insurance. In some cases, depending on the insurance company and the policy coverage they may be eligible for a dental discount. Again, the amount and availability of this discount varies widely.  In special circumstances some insurance may pay up to 50% depending on the type of policy. To offset the high cost of veneers, most dentists offer special payment plans.

Getting dental veneers is a multi-step process. The initial visit usually consists of a consultation and depending on the dentist and the amount of work to be done, x-rays and/or impressions of the teeth may be done at this time.  On the first working visit the dentist will remove approximately 1/2 millimeter of enamel from the tooth or teeth to be veneered and make a model to send to the lab that will make the veneer.  This is most often done with a local anesthetic. Normally it takes one to two weeks to construct the veneers.  During the next visit, the veneer is temporarily placed to check for proper color and fit.

The tooth that is to receive the veneer is then cleaned, polished, and etched. The etching roughens the surface of the tooth for better adhesion of the veneer. The veneer is cemented into place and a follow up visit to check placement and adhesion may be required.

How long do porcelain veneers last?  They can last between five and ten years or more, depending on how you take care of them. But at some point they probably will need to be replaced. Just like real teeth, porcelain veneers need to be thoroughly brushed and flossed daily.

Your smile is the first thing people notice about you which is the primary reason people want porcelain veneers.  If we can be of service or you have any questions, please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Thank you for all your referrals.  We truly appreciate them.

Information included is not dental or medical advice.  For your specific information

be sure to consult your dentist.

Related articles

Dentist Sandy Springs: What Discolors Teeth?

Tooth discoloration and staining causes embarrassment and self-consciousness.  Though many causes of tooth discoloration are under your control, some are not.  The following is a brief list of some causes and cures:

  1. Drinks: Coffee and tea tend to stain teeth, especially when sipped over a prolonged period.  Periodic professional cleanings and in-office tooth whitening reverse these effects.
  2. Smoking/Tobacco:  Smoking and chewing tobacco have a negative effect on tooth color, gingival health, and breath.  The best treatment is to quit smoking.  Periodic in-office cleanings and profession tooth whitening minimize the discoloring effects of smoking.
  3. Dental Restorations: Metal restorations tend to breakdown at the edges (margins) and may reduce the transparency of tooth enamel.  Replacing metal fillings with tooth colored composites or porcelains reverses these effects.  Even tooth-colored restorations stain with time and may need replacement.
  4. Age: With aging comes the cumulative effect of tooth staining.  The outer tooth enamel wears down with time, causing teeth to turn more yellow.  Porcelain veneers or dental bonding replace that worn layer and restore the youthful glow of teeth.
  5. Chemicals and Medications:  During the tooth development of a child, certain antibiotics such as tetracycline or excessive ingestion of fluoride can cause permanent tooth staining.  Though these stains cannot be cleaned or whitened, porcelain veneers or composite bonding can give the stained teeth a new look.

In addition to the causes listed above, trauma and genetics play a role in changing tooth color. Keep your teeth whiter and brighter by regular dental cleanings (which usually include stain removal and polishing) and ask us about our cosmetic options to get that right smile.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200B

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Thank you for all your referrals.  We truly appreciate them.

Information included is not dental or medical advice.  For your specific information

 be sure to consult your dentist.

Dentist Atlanta: Should You See a Specialist? Probably Yes.

There are two types of dentistry today.  One is the traditional dentistry targeting the oral hygiene and prevention of oral diseases, tooth decay, etc., by diagnosis and routine oral treatment.  Its focus is maintenance oriented and percentage which is covered by insurance.  The other and most recent is cosmetic dentistry, aiming to improve the appearance of your teeth and smile.  And in some instances dental procedures are implemented to improve function, which may have the tertiary effect of improving your smile, i.e. an implant.  Thus, general oral diseases and related health issues are treated by general dental practitioners during the routine care of your oral health.  Whereas cosmetic dentistry should be handled by a dental specialist, whether it is a prosthodontist, orthodontist or an oral surgeon/periodontist in conjunction with a prosthodontist.   Cosmetic dentistry, while it is not a dental specialty, has risen to an art form in the field of dentistry.  When applied in conjunction with the restorative benefits of general dentistry like dental fillings which fall within the domain of general dentistry but crosses over into cosmetics when the materials of the restoration serve two purposes; the filling itself and the appearance of the filling.  Thus a composite dental filling is covered by cosmetic dentistry to retain your look and smile as usual, but avoids the unsightliness of an amalgam (mercury filling).

There are many dental clinics and general practitioners providing a myriad of cosmetic dentistry procedures.  Before opting for treatment, one needs to take care in selecting the right type of dentist with investigation that should include references, reviews, training and the skill set for the treatment as well as the particular procedure and protocol to be followed.  In metro cities like Atlanta one can find many dentists who purport to be trained (or have trained themselves) as cosmetic dentists, which happens to be a self-proclaimed non-existent specialty.  These dental clinics and practitioners are providing general dentistry as well as cosmetic dentistry that ranges from performing root canal treatment, periodontal treatment, children’s dentistry, teeth whitening, bleaching and advanced cosmetic dentistry such as the placing of implants.  Purported cosmetic dentists providing various cosmetic procedures as well as surgeries like full mouth rehabilitation, tooth laminates, tooth veneers, crowns, bridges, etc., can make a mess of your mouth if you’re not careful.

Little known, prosthodontic dentists are with the passage of time gaining popular recognition as patients become more familiar with the advances in dentistry and how they can enhance their everyday lives. They are expert dentists with a post graduate ADA recognized degree centered around a complete knowledge of dentistry, where function and beautification of teeth are combined in the final result — the right smile.  A comprehensive approach by a prosthodontist is the best way to ensure that you are receiving the competent and qualified dental care you need.

Dr. Scheinfeld received her prosthodontics degree from Emory University’s Prosthodontics program in 1988.  Of the more than 170,000 dentists in the United States less than 3,200 are degreed prosthodontists.   If the Right Smile Center can answer your questions or provide you with a complimentary consultation, please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Woodstock: The Mercury Filling Controversy

 

Deutsch: Amalgamfüllung Español: Ejemplo de Am...
Image via Wikipedia

Whenever I hear a patient ask about amalgam restorations (usually referred to as mercury fillings), I wonder why this question refuses to go away.  For decades, amalgams have been considered the primary restorative material for posterior teeth (the ones in the back) because of their long time success.  After enormous amounts of study the World Health Organization, the FDI World Dental Federation, and the American Dental Association continue to endorse the use of amalgam to restore teeth.   Yet it continues to be demonized by the public, in particular in urban legends over the internet.

As a result the trend is towards the less and less use of amalgams and the greater use of composite resins to restore posterior teeth.  One of our consultants, Tom Limoli of Limoli and Associates notes that US third-party payment data reflects that 65% of direct posterior restorations last year were resin-based composite, while 35% were amalgam.  So regardless of the empirical evidence to the contrary, the patient pool is demanding composite restorations.

Every dentist will need an alternative material to use in the restoration of posterior teeth as this trend continues.  The challenge for the dentist is that composite resins only have a life expectancy of 5 to 8 years.  Given the patient’s desire to be rid of the potential or theoretical health hazards that have been formulated in recent years, amalgam restorations will ultimately be eliminated by the slow and natural death of attrition.  While amalgam has been the material of choice for decades and still remains the primary source of teaching in dental schools today, it may not be in the future.  Given the patient demand for composite restorations and what appears to be the dentist’s propensity to capitulate, we are going to need a better solution to posterior restorations if we want to achieve the same longevity that is achieved through amalgam restorations.

The internet has continued to create an uncertainty on the part of the lay public about amalgams similar to the controversy that surrounds cell phones and brain tumors.  It is interesting to note the dilemma faced by dentists today, when we know that amalgam is the better choice for the restoration, but the popular demand or path of least resistance is a composite restoration.  This disconnect creates some interesting food for thought.[1]

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200 

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles


[1]Additional sources of information came from Gordon J. Christensen, DDS, James F. Simon, DDS, and Howard E. Strassler, DMD. Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry, July/August, 2011.