Dentist Alpharetta: Crohn’s Disease

CrohnsStem cells found in gum tissue may fight inflammatory disease, which would be great news for IBD patients.[1]  Apparently, they have a much less inflammatory reaction and heal much faster when compared to skin stem cells.  When stem cells from the gum tissue were transplanted into mice with dextrate sulfate sodium-induced colitis — an inflamed condition of the colon — the inflammation was significantly reduced.[2]  These stem cells have the ability to develop into different types of cells as well as affect the immune system, which poses wonderful hope for patients with Crohn’s disease.

In the meantime, research on the relationship between IBD and stem cells is still ongoing.  If we can be of assistance, give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

 


[1] University of Southern California (2013, August 5). Stem cells found in gum tissue can fight inflammatory disease. ScienceDaily. Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC study in the Journal of Dental Research.

[2] Ibid.

Dentist Alpharetta: We need more BIGGEST LOSERS!!

Overweight woman buttoning up her jeans. Image shot 2010. Exact date unknown.Think twice before taking that next bite.  Because we know that being overweight can affect many aspects of a person’s health.  Now researchers suspect a link exists between obesity and gum disease.  Whether one condition is a risk factor for another or whether one disease directly causes another has yet to be discovered.[1]

What we do know is half of the U.S. population age 30 and older is affected by gum disease — a chronic inflammatory infection that impacts the surrounding and supporting structures of the teeth.[2] Gum disease itself produces its own set of cytokines, which further increases the level of these inflammatory proteins in the body’s bloodstream, helping to set off a chain reaction of other inflammatory diseases throughout the body.[3]  So it is important to visit a dentist at least twice a year so he or she can evaluate your risks for developing gum disease and offer preventive strategies.

Impacting approximately one-third of the U.S. population, obesity has become a significant health concern for Americans.  As a part of your strategy to stay healthy, a dentist can design a personalized program of home oral care to meet your specific needs.  In the meantime, research on the relationship between obesity and gum disease is still ongoing.

If we can be of assistance, give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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[1] January/February 2013 issue of General Dentistry, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), it also may be a risk factor for gum disease.

[3] Ibid.

Dentist Alpharetta: Marketing of Products or Procedures

products
There are an abundance of dental products out there.

At Scheinfelds, Orland and Tourial we take a consultative approach to ensuring each patient’s program aligns with their operating culture and unique risk exposures. This means we don’t push products.  Nor do we try and sell you anything.  Instead, we work closely with you and your needs to develop and deliver the right solution, even if that means doing no dentistry at all.

The dentists who engage in the marketing or sale of products or procedures to their patients must take care not to exploit the inherent trust in the dentist-patient relationship for their own financial gain.  We take this very seriously.  Dentists should not induce their patients to purchase products or undergo procedures by misrepresenting the product’s value, the necessity of the procedure or the dentist’s professional expertise in recommending the product or procedure.

Particularly in the case of health related products, it is not enough for the dentist to rely on the manufacturer’s or distributor’s representations about the product’s safety and efficacy.  Rather, the dentist has an independent obligation to inquire into the truth and accuracy of such claims and verify that they are founded on accepted scientific knowledge or research.  For instance, we have discussed in earlier writings that there is no scientific evidence of cause and effect as it relates to mercury fillings and your health.  So it would be improper and unethical to recommend the removal of amalgams based on a dentist’s professional expertise.

Dentists should disclose to their patients all relevant information the patient needs to make an informed purchase decision.  From the beginning, Scheinfelds, Orland and Tourial built its foundation on basic operating principles – integrity, honesty and quality health care. These are not just words to us, rather truths that can be validated by the patient relationships we have held for over 25 years. To us, it’s simple. We base decisions on what we believe to be in the best interests of our patients and our employees. We understand that each puts a great deal of trust in us, and we do not take that trust lightly.  Our culture is unlike any in the industry.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Alpharetta: Babes in Oy Land!!

babyIt’s not enough that new parents have to read every label on every baby product, now they have to pay more attention to the oral health of their toothless babies. A recent University of Illinois study confirms the presence of bacteria associated with early childhood caries in infant saliva.  “By the time a child reaches kindergarten, 40 percent have dental cavities.”[1] Cavities are the most prevalent infectious disease in U.S. children, according to the CDC.  “In addition, populations who are of low socioeconomic status, who consume a diet high in sugar, and whose mothers have low education levels are 32 times more likely to have this disease.”[2]

The study focused on infants before teeth erupted, compared to most studies focused on children already in preschool or kindergarten. Through 454 pyro-sequencing, researchers learned that the oral bacterial community in infants without teeth was much more diverse than expected and identified hundreds of species. The presence of members of the bacterial community that cause biofilm formation or are associated with ECC are already present in infant saliva justifies more research on the evolution of the infant oral bacterial community.[3]

So it’s not that you don’t have enough to do raising your child, you have to be on the lookout for new issues where there is no recommended treatment.  We typically recommend you stay on top of your child’s oral health and bring them in as early as teeth begin to erupt.

If we can be of help, give us a holler.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Alpharetta: Wisdom Teeth, who needs them?

wisdom teeth crowdingResearchers from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine have discovered a statistical association between the injection of local dental anesthesia given to children ages two to six and evidence of missing lower wisdom teeth.[1]  The results of this study suggest that injecting anesthesia into the gums of these children may have interrupted the development of the lower wisdom teeth.  The incidence of missing wisdom teeth was significantly higher in a studied group that had received dental anesthesia at an early age.  According to the study the statistical evidence suggests that the absence of wisdom teeth following dental anesthesia in this population group did not happen by chance alone.

Not everyone develops wisdom teeth, but for those who do, the teeth often become impacted or problematic and require removal.  What’s interesting to note is that dentists who administered anesthesia to their patients at an early age may have been unwittingly preventing the development of their third molars.  This type of research provides hope that eventually there will be a preventative treatment eliminating third molars way before they become problematic.

If we can be of assistance or answer any of your questions please contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

Info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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[1] April 2013 JADA, authors of the study are Anthony R. Silvestri, D.M.D., Clinical professor at Tufts University,  Gerald (Jerry) Swee, D.M.D., M.S., clinical instructor in the department of pediatric dentistry; Matthew Finkelman, Ph.D., assistant professor; Alfred Rich, D.M.D., M.D.S., clinical associate professor in the department of pediatric dentistry; Stanley Alexander, D.M.D., chair and professor of the department of pediatric dentistry; Cheen Loo, B.D.S., M.P.H., Ph.D., D.M.D., associate professor in the department of pediatric dentistry, all of Tufts University School of Dental Medicine.

Dentist Alpharetta: Dental Frequency

Dental Insurance issuesNo, I am not talking about radio waves. This little phrase refers to how often a given dental treatment is covered.  The “frequency limitation” on a certain dental treatment covered by your insurance policy is one extremely important provision.  This element of your policy confounds both the patient and the dentist.  The insurer states clearly the frequency limitations in the policy outline offered you, so even if that dental surface develops a very bad cavity and develops over several surfaces of one tooth, the insurance may not offer any coverage.

This is why it is important that you have a very good communication with your dentist’s front office, particularly the person in charge of filing insurance claims.  After getting a dental surface filled, your dentist should show you good dental health practices on how to take care of that filling, and how to avoid developing another cavity on that surface.  Because more often than not, the insurance will not cover it within 2 years of treatment.

The same goes for crowns.  Once you have had the crown seated and something happens down the road or the patient develops a dental cavity under the crown, the insurer will usually not cover it again.  One of the more frequent problems with dental crowns is when they are not properly seated, the patient develops a cavity at the margin of the crown.  Once again, the insurer will not cover the restoration.

But denied dental claims should not be a reason to panic. As long as you have good communication with you dentist, and she is a truly good professional you should not have problems.  So it’s extremely important to receive dental work from a highly skilled dental practice that can create long lasting solid dental crowns and can address any potential dental issues correctly before the crown is placed.

If we can be of service or answer your questions, please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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Dental Anxiety? Dentist Alpharetta

FearA fair number of people don’t look forward to dental appointments any more than they look forward to visits to a physician.   And while modern dental procedures aren’t painful, just being examined can make people feel stressed.  Dental anxiety and even phobia are relatively common.  It has been estimated that 9% to 15% of patients avoid seeing the dentist because of anxiety or fear.  That’s about 30 million to 40 million people in this country.  One survey suggests 36% of those who didn’t see a dentist regularly said that fear was the main reason.[1]

Unfortunately, there isn’t a clear boundary that separates normal anxiety from being phobic.  Everyone has fears and concerns and copes with them in different ways.   However, the prospect of dental work in these times should not create a sense of  fear.   If it does, then you may need some help, as in medication, overcoming the fears.   Whether you suffer paralyzing fear of the dentist, in the sense that you avoiding coming or experience just a slight apprehension, here are a couple of suggestions that can help make your next dental visit a positive experience.

Take the time to communicate with your dentist and the staff.   Don’t be embarrassed or concerned about discussing your anxiety with the office.   You are not the first patient that ever felt nervous or anxious.   Let them know your concerns and fears before a procedure or if you experience any discomfort during your treatment.  It is very important to have clear and open communication with your dental provider. Talking will make your experience more relaxed and pleasant.

If you are so anxious or nervous prior to a procedure, talk to the dentist about ways to make the experience easier.  Nitrous oxide or other medications (such as Xanax) are used to help you relax depending on the level of your anxiety.  The dentist and staff should make every effort to make your visit comforting and stress-free.

If we can be of assistance, please contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com


[1] British Dental Health Foundation, Citation unknown.

Dentist Alpharetta: Sleight of Hand

Best dentist near meAccording to the American Dental Association, the use of a non-health degree in an announcement to the public (such as in a practice website or blog) may be misleading because the public is likely to assume that any degree announced is related to the qualifications of the dentist as a practitioner.  Many dental related associations grant dentists ‘fellowship’ status as a token of membership in the organization or some other form of voluntary association.[1]  But the use of such fellowships in advertising to the general public is misleading because of the likelihood that it will indicate to the public the attainment of some enhanced education or skill in the field of dentistry.

The problem in the practice of dentistry is the misrepresentation of the qualifications of the holder that is inferred in these designations.  In order to properly serve the public, dentists should represent themselves in a manner that contributes to the esteem of the profession.  Dentists should not misrepresent their training and competence in any way that would be false or misleading in any material respect.  Although any dentist may advertise, no dentist shall solicit patients in a form of communication that is false or misleading by suggesting they have reached some additional accreditation by being associated with one of these dental organizations.   A general dentist may announce fellowships or other credentials earned in the area of general dentistry so long as they avoid any communications that express or imply specialization in a particular area of dentistry and the announcement includes the disclaimer that the dentist is a general dentist.  Additionally, the ADA dissuades the use of abbreviations to designate credentials when such use would lead the reasonable person to believe that the designation represents an academic degree, which is usually the case.

Dental specialties are designed to help the public make an informed selection between the practitioner who has completed an accredited program beyond the dental degree and a practitioner who has not completed such a program.  The dental specialties recognized by the American Dental Association and the designation for ethical specialty announcement and limitation of practice are: dental public health, endodontics, oral and maxillofacial pathology, oral and maxillofacial radiology, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics, pediatric dentistry, periodontics and prosthodontics.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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[1]These fellowships are not ADA accredited.

Dentist Alpharetta: Who Moved My Cheese?

cheeseOr ‘ate my cheese’, because dairy products may be good for your oral health.  A new study suggests that consuming cheese products may help protect your teeth against cavities.  So not only do you get strong bones, you get healthy teeth.[1]

The study sampled 68 patients ranging in age from 12 to 15 and found a higher pH level in those that consumed cheese, which may have induced a higher saliva level from the chewing, suggesting that cheese has anti-cavity properties.  Additionally, various compounds found in cheese may adhere to tooth enamel and further help teeth from acid (found in wine for instance) erosion.

If we can be of help or answer your questions, please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com


[1] General Dentistry, Journal of Academy of General Dentistry, May/June 2013.

Death Defying Sedation Dentistry? Dentist Alpharetta

IV sedationSedation is a common part of wisdom tooth extractions and implant placements.  But more and more dentists are offering patients who otherwise might be anxious the option to have their dentistry performed under sedation.  While death from conscious sedation during a dental procedure is rare, you want to make sure your dentist is properly trained and takes every precaution possible.  You might want to have second thoughts if the dentist doesn’t require a comprehensive physical before administering conscious sedation.

Every patient needs continuous monitoring for changes in blood pressure, heart rate and oxygen levels, with a trained assistant present who keeps close records of these vital signs and medications provided.  And certain guidelines should be followed, such as other ongoing health issues, allergies, weight characteristics, when the patient last ate and any other conditions that might alter the risk of complications.  Steps have to be taken before, during and after the procedure to ensure the safety of the patient.

Given the risks associated with sedation, some anesthesiologists express concern that dentist might not be receiving enough training to perform well in an emergency situation.  Apparently however, the lure of thousands of new found dollars has stimulated an increasing attendance in weekend courses on oral sedation. These courses promise to train dentists in how to safely administer sedation to both adults and children, in a few short lessons over one or several weekends.

The ADA supports the right of ‘appropriately trained’ dentists to use sedation or even general anesthesia to treat patients, while the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, has expressed concern over the use of weekend courses to adequately prepare a dentist with the emergencies that can arise through the use of oral sedatives.  Weekend seminars are valuable sources of continuing education, but a single or even multiple seminars do not the appropriate expertise necessary to perform sedation dentistry. Even under the best of circumstances, maloccurrences occur.

I personally have found that the concentration required to perform excellent dentistry does not allow for proper monitoring of a sedated patient.  If it’s not nitrous oxide/conscious sedation, I do not sedate patients.   This is not to suggest there aren’t bona fide specialists in the field of dental anesthesiology but having the training and experience to properly handle critical, even life threatening emergencies, while a patient is sedated is paramount.

It’s the patient’s responsibility to ensure the dentist has acquired sufficient training and it is the responsibility of a parent to ask about the doctor’s credentials before allowing their child to be sedated.  I cannot overemphasize the importance to seek out a board eligible or certified dental anesthesiologist if you or your child needs sedation in order to receive dental care.

You should not be afraid to ask the dentist for their credentials, and you want to be fully informed about the process before you agree to conscious sedation for you or your child.  If we can be of assistance do not hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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