Dentist East Cobb: Are You Thumbing Your Mouth At Me?

Siblings Thumb Sucking
Siblings Thumb sucking

Our goal is to educate patients about the importance of oral health, its advances and how the right smile can change one’s life.

If you have a new born or have one on the way, you’re going find out that infants have a natural instinct to suck as a way of nourishing and soothing themselves. Often, this leads to the child sucking on their fingers, a blanket, a stuffed animal or their thumb. Usually, this habit is given up by age 4. If it continues, it can be extremely detrimental to the development of their teeth and jaws causing crooked teeth, an incorrect bite, speech problems and/or open-mouth breathing.

What should a parent do? If possible, try to switch them to a properly designed pacifier that fits the shape of the mouth. Pacifiers are less likely to create the same developmental problems [by distributing forces over greater area], are usually discarded by the child at an earlier age and are easier to hide than a thumb. If the thumb sucking is during the day, discuss the problem with them to discourage the habit. Placing a band-aid on their thumb as a reminder may help. Be positive and praise them when they remember. And reward them for their success.

It is more difficult to control thumb sucking when the child is asleep, because the child is unaware of this involuntary action. So, try this habit-breaking technique that is usually successful within two weeks. Before your child goes to bed, wrap a 2-inch wide ace bandage lightly around their fully extended arm [straight]. Start about 3 inches from their armpit and continue down past the elbow. This will not prevent your child from putting their thumb into their mouth. However, as soon as they fall asleep, the tension created by bending the elbow will pull the thumb from their mouth.

If your child is still sucking on their thumb or anything else by the time their permanent teeth erupt [around age 6], please call it to the attention of our office.

Novy Scheinfeld DDS PC
290 Carpenter Dr, 200A
Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328
(404) 256-3620
info@rightsmilecenter.com
http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

 

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Dentist East Cobb: Dental Implants

East Cobb dentist implants near meAccording to the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, almost 70 percent of adults between the ages of 35 and 44 have lost at least one permanent tooth to an accident, gum disease, a failed root canal or tooth decay.[1]  Furthermore, by age 74, 26% of adults have lost all of their permanent teeth.[2]  These are amazing statistics about the status oral health.  Twenty years ago, these patients would have had no alternative but to employ a fixed bridge or removable denture in order to restore their ability to eat, speak clearly and smile.   Fortunately, today there is a viable option for patients who are missing permanent teeth – dental implants.  Rather than solutions resting on the gum line like removable dentures, or destroying adjacent teeth to anchor fixed bridges, dental implants are long-term replacements that truly function like your natural teeth.  In addition, they preserve your underlying jaw bone structure.

Whether you are a young, middle-aged or an older adult; whether you need to replace one tooth, several teeth, or all your teeth, there is a high probability there is a dental implant solution to your situation.  Your implant can be placed in our office.  So what are you waiting for?  Contact us for your complimentary consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

700-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist East Cobb: INVEST IN YOUR SMILE, YOU WEAR IT EVERYDAY…

east cobb dentist near meThere is no better way to boost your self-confidence that adds a spark to your personality than a charming smile.  At The Right Smile Center, we can give you that.

If you have any sort of a smile defect such as gaps between teeth, crooked teeth, gummy smile, protruding teeth, stained teeth, chipped teeth, artificial looking crowns or any problem which makes you self-conscious while talking or smiling, The Right Smile Center has an expert panel of aesthetic dentists to help you.  All aesthetic defects are treated and corrected using various solutions such as veneers, bonding, tooth and gum contouring, etc., to shape and enhance your smile.

Your smile makes the first impression on everyone you meet.  A radiant smile will do much more than just cosmetic make ups or a new hair style to enhance your personality.  It will boost your personality and literally change your life!  If you would like to experience the magic of a dazzling but natural smile, book your appointment today and stand out from the rest.

A state-of the-art dental practice in the heart of Sandy Springs founded in 1992.

The Right Smile Center offers hi-tech, quality cosmetic and family dentistry in a friendly and comfortable environment.  We pride ourselves on our clinical excellence offered with unparalleled customer service.

Our cosmetic dentist Dr. Novy Scheinfeld is one of American’s Top Cosmetic Dentists in the country. Dr. Scheinfeld is an Emory University trained prosthodontist, one of only 3200 out 170,000 dentists in the country.  Dr. Scheinfeld has treated CNN broadcasters, professional sports players, music artists like Stevie Nicks and dentists in the surrounding area.

Among our services, we offer in-house Endodontics and implant placement from Drs. Orland and Scheinfeld.  Celebrity or not, if you want to solve a problem or create a new more natural smile, we are confident that we can help.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist: East Cobb : Oral Health Care of Our Aging Population

Dentist near meTwo important oral health care concerns emerging in the United States are disparities in the oral disease burden and the inability of certain segments of the population to access oral healthcare.[1]  Older Americans are becoming a larger segment of our population and suffer disproportionately from oral diseases, with the problem being particularly acute for individuals in long term care facilities.  Population projections for the United States indicate that the elderly will constitute an increasing percentage of the population as we proceed into the 21st century.

In 2001, the population of the United States was almost 278 million, and 12.6% of the population was 65 years of age or older. By 2015, the population is expected to increase to 312 million (3.08 million in 2010) and 14.7% of the population will be aged 65 years or older.  In 2030, which is within the practice lives of students currently enrolled in dental schools, the population will have increased to more than 350 million, and 20% of the population—1 of every 5 members of the US society—will be 65 years of age or older.  This large segment of our population is further compounded by the elderly population continuing to become increasingly diverse in terms of race, ethnicity,financial resources, and living conditions.[2]

The challenges faced by both the dental profession and the nation as a whole regarding provision of oral health care services to older adults were the subject of a recent report prepared by Oral Health America.[3]  All 50 states were surveyed to determine the level of Medicaid coverage for dental services, and the report concludes that financing oral health care services for the elderly will be a major challenge to our future.  Medicare does not provide any coverage for dental services, and only 1 of 5 Americans aged 75 years or older has any type of private dental insurance.  Given our current economic circumstances it will be highly unlikely that our government resources will be adequate to gear up for the impending problem of oral health for the elderly.

The elderly suffer from chronic disorders that can directly or indirectly affect oral health, including autoimmune disorders such as pemphigus and pemphigoid.[4] They generally require multiple medications, and common side effects of the more than 500 medications used to treat their overall health issues usually reduce salivary flow.[5]   Usually the reduction in saliva can adversely affect their quality of life, the ability to chew, and lead to significant problems of the teeth and their supporting structures.

The elderly may also have difficulty performing routine oral hygiene procedures because of physical limitations, such as Parkinson’s or rheumatoid arthritis.   In addition,oral infection is now recognized as a risk factor for a number of systemic diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular diseases,diabetes, mellitus, and respiratory disorders.  Also,it is important to note that once people have lost their teeth and are using complete dentures, their oral health needs do not decrease.   Our jaws are not static and may continue to resorb over time.  Besides the continued resorption of bone, improperly fitted dentures can adversely affect chewing, leading to poor nutrition.  In addition, those without teeth remain susceptible to oral cancer, mucosal diseases, and alterations in salivary gland function.

So for the vast majority of seniors who will reside in a long term care facility, financing of oral health care services will be a formidable challenge.Given that medicare does not provide coverage for routine dental services including exams,and in the absence of private insurance or personal resources,a large portion of this group will not be able to afford any dental services whatsoever, let alone the most appropriate treatments.  Clearly, there must be a response to the increasing oral health concerns of the elderly who present with special needs, especially those who are home bound or living in long term  facilities burdened with other chronic disorders.

While effective preventive measures exist for younger populations(water fluoridation, dental sealants and parents), no preventive measures have been devised to address the expected increase in oral health needs of the aging population.  And the need for a coordinated effort to address the oral healthcare needs of the elderly suggested by demographic trends and epidemiological data necessitates our planning for what might be considered a crisis or at least a paradigm shift in oral health care delivery for the elderly.  Such a plan must consider contributions from the dental profession, possibly through the efforts of the American Dental Association (ADA) and its state and local associations; the dental schools, with involvement of the American Dental Education Association; federal, state, and local health authorities; and assistance from national organizations and foundations that focus on health care.  The dental profession has an opportunity to take a leadership role in the delivery of health care services to the seniors who have contributed so vitally to our society’s well-being and who deserve to be treated with the best oral health care we have to offer.

Dr. Scheinfeld is a prosthodontist specializing in geriatric care.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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[1] Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, Md: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; 2000.

[2] Wikipedia and 2010 Census.                                                                                

[3] A State of Decay: The Oral Health of Older Americans. Chicago, Ill: Oral Health America; 2003:1–8.

[4] Stoopler ET, Sollecito TP, De Ross SS. Desquamative gingivitis: early presenting system of mucocutaneous disease. Quintessence Int.2003;34:582–586.

[5] Fox PC, Eversole LR. Diseases of the salivary glands. In: Silverman S, Eversole LR, Truelove EL, eds. Essentials of Oral Medicine. Ontario, Canada: BC Decker; 2002:260–276.

Dentist East Cobb: Dental Advice for Moms-To-Be

Angelina-Jolie-pregnantExpecting a baby is a very exciting time, and you’re already on the right path if you’re staying on top of your dental health. With the proper dental care measures, you’ll increase your chances of having a smoother pregnancy, full-term delivery and healthy baby.

If you’re planning to get pregnant, consider having your teeth cleaned and any restorative dental treatment done first. If you are already pregnant, be sure to tell your dentist before getting any work done. You should also have a dental checkup at least once during the pregnancy. Although dental cleanings aren’t harmful, it’s recommended that expecting mothers get them done during the second trimester to reduce the risk of complications.

According to the American Dental Association (ADA), it’s best to postpone dental work during the first and third trimesters as well, as these are critical periods for the baby’s development. Your dentist will let you know what dental treatments can be performed during the second trimester, but more complicated procedures will probably be postponed, if possible. Unnecessary treatments, such as cosmetic dental work, should be avoided altogether.

If you do have an unexpected dental problem or emergency, make an appointment with your dentist as soon as you can. Your dentist will look for signs of infection and determine the need for treatment. Dental X-rays are usually avoided during pregnancy, but if photos are necessary, your dentist will take extra precautions to protect your baby.

Just as dental health is connected to your overall health, dental care is important to the health of your unborn baby. It’s extremely important to take care of your teeth during pregnancy, as some dental problems can increase the risk of complications.

The best advice is to make sure your dentist is part of your baby’s pre-natal care team from the beginning.  If we can answer any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist East Cobb: Diet & Exercise May Prevent Gum Disease

Women runningCan working out improve your dental health? Yes, according to one study. Researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine have discovered that people of a normal weight who exercise regularly and maintain a healthy diet are less likely to have gum disease. The study, published in the Journal of Periodontology, suggests that a healthy lifestyle may help prevent periodontal disease.

Researchers took the same factors that lower the risk of diabetes and heart disease into account when analyzing data from 12,110 participants. They found that those who exercised regularly, had healthy eating habits and maintained their weight were 40 percent less likely to develop periodontal disease than their counterparts. Those who met two of the criteria lowered their risk by 29 percent, while participants with just one healthy virtue had a 16 percent less chance of developing gum disease.

Overall, only 7 percent of those who met all three of the criteria had some form of gum disease. The participants who had a poor diet, limited physical activity and were considered overweight totaled 18 percent, suggesting that obesity can more than double your chances of developing periodontal disease.

Scientists aren’t exactly sure why these factors may decrease your chances of developing gum disease. It’s already known that healthy eating can help build up your immune system. Scientists now theorize that eating healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables, may also help remove dental plaque from teeth. It’s also believed that obesity promotes gum inflammation, while physical activity may decrease it.

While a healthy lifestyle may help improve your dental health, it’s not a substitute for maintaining a good oral hygiene routine. Brushing and flossing daily and seeing your dentist twice a year are essential.  Since June of 2015 we offer in-house implant and endodontic services through Drs. ZoAnna Scheinfeld and Hanna Orland.  If we can be of service or answer any of your questions please feel free to give us a call or email.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist: East Cobb: Healthy smile, healthy you!

Regular dental visits do more than just keep your smile attractive; they can tell a dentist a lot about your overall health, including whether or not you may be developing a disease like diabetes.  Recent research suggests that the health of your mouth is a reflection of the condition of your body as a whole.  Meaning, if your mouth is healthy, chances are your overall health is also good.  It’s kind of like hand in glove.  So if you have poor oral health, this may be a sign that you may have other health issues.

There is further indication that a healthy smile may actually prevent certain diseases from occurring, such as gum precipitated heart infections.  As of late, a lot of orthopedic surgeons are requiring a blessing from your dentist before they operate.  According to the American Academy of Periodontology, there is a relationship between gum (periodontal) disease and health complications such as a stroke and heart disease.[1]   Women with gum disease also show higher incidences of pre-term, low birth-weight babies.  Recent studies also have shown that there are microbiologic and immunological findings that strongly support the association.  The studies indicate that periodontal infection can lead to placental-fetal exposure and, when coupled with a fetal inflammatory response, can lead to preterm delivery.[2]

Further research shows that more than 80 percent of all systemic diseases (involving many organs or the whole body) have oral manifestations, including swollen gums, mouth ulcers, dry mouth and/or excessive gum problems. Such systemic diseases include:

  • ·        diabetes
  • ·        leukemia
  • ·        cancer
  • ·        heart disease
  • ·        kidney disease

Since most people have regular oral examinations, their dentist may be the first line of defense to diagnose a health problem in its early stages.

Failing to take care of your teeth and can actually lead to other health problems, including:

  • ·        Oral and facial pain.  According to the Office of the Surgeon General, this pain may be largely due to infections of the gums that support the teeth and can lead to tooth loss. Gingivitis, an early stage of gum disease, and advanced gum disease affect more than 75 percent of the U.S. population.
  • ·        Problems with the heart and other major organs.  Mouth infections can affect major organs. For example, the heart and heart valves can become inflamed by bacterial endocarditis, a condition that affects people with heart disease or anyone with damaged heart tissue.
  • ·        Oral cancer. Poor oral care can contribute to oral cancer, which now takes more lives annually than cervical or skin cancer.
  • ·        Digestion problems.  Digestion begins with physical and chemical processes in the mouth, and problems here can lead to intestinal failure, irritable bowel syndrome and other digestion disorders.

Seeing a dentist regularly helps to keep your mouth healthy and allows your dentist opportunities to examine developments that may point to other health issues.  A dental exam also can detect poor nutrition and hygiene and growth and development problems. As always, if you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact our office in Sandy Springs for a consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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[1]  “Gum Disease Links to Heart Disease and Stroke.” American Academy of Periodontology, May 8, 2008. www.perio.org/consumer/mbc.heart.htm

[2] JADA, 2006, Exploring the relationship between periodontal disease and pregnancy complications

Yiorgos A. Bobetsis, DDS, PhD, Silvana P. Barros, DDS, PhD and Steven Offenbacher, DDS, PhD, MMSc

Dentist East Cobb: How much do Dental Sealants cost?

About 90% of the decay found in children’s teeth occurs in tooth surfaces with pits and fissures. To solve this problem, dental sealants were developed to act as a physical barrier so that cavity-causing bacteria cannot invade the pits and fissures on the chewing surfaces of back (posterior) teeth.

A sealant is a plastic resin material that is usually applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth. This material is bonded into the depressions and grooves (pits and fissures) of the chewing surfaces and acts as a barrier, protecting enamel from attack by plaque and/or acids.

The dentist, hygienist or assistant cleans and dries the teeth to be treated, then paints a thin layer of liquid plastic material on the pits and fissures of the tooth. A blue spectrum natural light is shone on the material for a few seconds to cure the plastic. Some brands of sealants cure chemically.

After curing, the plastic becomes a hard, thin layer covering the treated portions of the tooth. Despite the incredible pressures placed on teeth during chewing each day, dental sealants often remain effective for five years or longer, although sealants do wear naturally and should be checked at regular intervals. If sealants wear or become damaged, they can be repaired or replaced simply by applying new sealant material to the worn or damaged portions.

Children should receive sealants shortly after the eruption of their first permanent molars, around age 6 and again at age 12 when their second molars appear.  While the use in children is more prevalent, sealants can be utilized in treating adults as well.

The average cost of a sealant ranges from $42 to $48 dollars per tooth.  During your child’s regular dental visits, we will check the condition of the sealants and reapply them if necessary.

As a final note, the procedure is absolutely painless.  I know a lot of people still cringe when we talk about dental procedures.

If we can be of service or you have additional questions, do not hesitate to contact us via email or for a complimentary initial consult.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist East Cobb: How much do Dental Crowns Cost?

Dental crowns cost anywhere between $900.00 and $1600.00 each depending on the tooth to being restored. In addition, the cost will vary depending on materials, complexity and the dentist’s training and experience and to some degree the location of the practice.  Insurance may pay part of a crown’s cost if it’s obviously needed for medical reasons, but usually crowns are covered only on a limited basis per year.  Depending on the customers’ needs and wishes, partial and full crowns made of various materials may be utilized.  Crowns are made of gold, porcelain, resin or porcelain-fused-to-non-precious-metal.  A tooth-shaped cap (the crown) covers the entire surface of a tooth, adding strength, durability and stability. This usually requires two office visits; first to prepare the tooth, make an impression and install a temporary crown. The impression is sent to a dental laboratory or manufactured in-house with the use of a CAD aided milling machine to create the permanent crown, which is installed during the second appointment.

There’s often an initial office visit ($65-$102) and X-rays ($85-$135).  One must not forget that there are additional costs that contribute to the overall price involved in crowns, aside from the material and type of crown chosen which are beyond the patient’s control.  A large share of undervalued costs goes toward the treatment itself, lab and production costs for the crown, aftercare and the like.

Dental care on a whole is often considered expensive, but with proper care a crown may last 10 or more years.  Depending upon the general wear and tear a crown is exposed to and how well you keep your teeth free of plaque, it could last indefinitely.  With somewhere between 10 and indefinitely, the investment becomes rather modest, if not inexpensive.

If we can be of service or answer any of your questions please do not hesitate to give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328-

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

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Dentist East Cobb: How Much Does a Root Canal Cost?

East Cobb Dentist near meThe cost of having a root canal done depends upon where you live, the type of dentist and whether or not you have dental insurance.  The procedure is usually done by a specialist known as an endodontist, but can be performed in a general dentist’s office.  The procedure can range anywhere from $900 to 1500.00 depending on the tooth location and the number of root canals involved.  The diagnosis will require an initial x-ray, which can be performed by your general dentist and forwarded to the endodontist’s office. 

Sometimes there are issues that arise where the endodontist wants to charge for an initial consultation.  This may or may not be necessary depending on the relationship the endodontist has with your referring general practitioner.  If you have insurance it will usually cover about half to eighty percent of the cost.  One of the added costs to a root canal that should be taken into account is either an amalgam (or composite) or crown restoration of the tooth by your general dentist upon completion of the procedure.

The root canal involves opening the tooth and removing the pulp of the tooth, which contains the tooth nerve that’s causing you so much pain.  What necessitates the procedure is the root of the tooth being infected and no known treatment to preserve the nerve from further deterioration.  The two most common causes of infection of the pulp are deep cavities and fractures or broken teeth. As treatment, the pulp tissue is removed, the root is cleaned with files and filled with an inorganic material that keeps bacteria out of the root and tooth.   Generally, a root/nerve involved tooth only gets worse over time without treatment.  And the longer you wait, the greater possibility you might suffer the loss of the entire tooth.

Prices don’t always reflect the quality of your treatment.  Having a sense of trust in our general dentist will usually result in the referral to our in-house endodontic staff that’s also worth trusting.  If we can be of service or you have further questions please don’t hesitate to contact us by phone or by email.  We are a stone’s throw from East Cobb, Vinings and downtown Marietta.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A            

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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