Dentist: Chamblee: Bottled Water – Good or Bad?

Chamblee Dentist near me

According to the ADA the majority of bottled water does not contain optimal levels of fluoride to protect your teeth against harmful bacteria.  In addition, some types of home water treatment systems also reduce the fluoride levels decreasing the decay-preventive effects of tap water.  The absence of fluoride is not to be inferred as some kind of public or private ban on the use of fluoridation, because this is not the case.  And with respect to your oral health, when used appropriately, fluoride is both safe and effective and probably your best means of preventing and controlling dental caries.  So how do you use fluoride to achieve the maximum protection against dental caries and efficiently reducing the likelihood of enamel fluorosis?  There are numerous fluoride modalities that are effective, inexpensive, readily available, and can be used in both private and public health settings.  And if left unchecked, the resulting bacteria can penetrate dissolved surfaces, attack the underlying dentin, and reach the soft pulp tissue, causing of course tooth decay.  Drinking fluoridated water, brushing with fluoride toothpaste, or using other fluoride dental products can effectively and inexpensively raise the concentration of fluoride in the saliva present in your mouth 100- to 1,000-fold.

Children and adults who are at low risk for dental caries can remain low risk through frequent exposure to small amounts of fluoride by drinking fluoridated water and using fluoride toothpaste.  While children and adults at high risk for dental caries should benefit from additional exposure to fluoride by going one step further and utilizing mouth rinse, dietary supplements, and professionally applied products.  The ADA reviews fluoride products for caries prevention through its voluntary Seal of Acceptance program and accepted products are listed in the ADA Guide to Dental Therapeutics.   At this particular moment in our oral healthcare, fluoride is the only nonprescription toothpaste additive proven to prevent dental caries.   As I have recommended in previous articles, brushing is the simplest and number one action you can take to maintain your teeth and oral hygiene.  This of course should be followed by regular cleanings and checkups with your dentist.

American Dental Association. ADA guide to dental therapeutics. 1st ed. Chicago, IL: American Dental Association, 1998.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

and

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs) GA, 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Acworth Dentist: I read this on Webmd.com

…. and thought it was a very practical approach to your dental care:

 

Your Oral Health Care Plan

Good oral health involves more than just brushing. To keep your teeth and mouth healthy for a lifetime of use, there are steps that you should follow. Here’s what you should consider:

1. Understand your own oral health needs.

Talk with your dentist, other oral health care specialist, or hygienist about any special conditions in your mouth and any ways in which your medical/health conditions affect your teeth or oral health. For example, cancer treatments, pregnancy, heart diseases, diabetes, dental appliances (dentures, braces) can all impact your oral health and may necessitate a change in the care of your mouth and/or teeth. Be sure to tell your dentist if you have experienced a change in your general health or in any medications you are taking since your last dental visit.

2. Develop, then follow, a daily oral health routine.

Based on discussions with your dentist, other oral health care specialist, and hygienist and considering your unique general health and oral health situations, develop an oral health routine that is easy to follow on a daily basis. For example, people with special conditions – such as pregnancy, diabetes and other underlying diseases, orthodontic appliances – may require additional instruction and perhaps treatments to keep their mouth healthy. Make sure you understand the additional care and/or treatment that is needed, commit to the extra tasks, and work them into your daily health routine.

3. Use fluoride.

Children and adults benefit from fluoride use. Fluoride strengthens developing teeth in children and prevents tooth decay in both children and adults. Toothpastes and mouth rinses contain fluoride. Fluoride levels in tap water may not be high enough without supplementation to prevent tooth decay. Contact your water utility to determine the level for your area. Talk with your dentist about your fluoride needs. Ask if fluoride supplements or a higher strength, prescription-only fluoride product is necessary for you.

4. Brush and floss daily.

Brush your teeth at least twice a day (morning and before bed time) and floss at least once a day. Better still would be to brush after every meal and snack. These activities remove plaque, which if not removed, combines with sugars to form acids that lead to tooth decay. Bacterial plaque also causes gum disease and other periodontal diseases.

5. Eat a balanced diet and limit snacking.

Eat a variety of foods, but eat fewer foods that contain sugars and starches (for example, cookies, cakes, pies, candies, ice cream, dried fruits and raisins, soft drinks, potato chips). These foods produce the most acids in the mouth, which begin the decay process. If you must snack, brush your teeth afterward or chew sugarless gum.

6. If you use tobacco products, quit.

Smoking cigarettes or using smokeless tobacco products increases your risk of oral cancer and cancers of the larynx, pharynx and esophagus; gum disease; as well as causes bad breath, tooth discoloration, and contribute to other oral and general health problems.

7. Examine your mouth regularly.

Become familiar with the appearance of your own mouth and teeth through frequent examination. This way, you will be able to catch any changes at an early stage and have these changes examined by a dentist. Look for the development of any spots, lesions, cuts, swellings, or growths on your gums, tongue, cheeks, inside of your lips, and floor and roof of your mouth. Examine your teeth for any signs of chipping or cracking, discoloration, and looseness. If you experience a change in your bite or develop pain, call your dentist as soon as possible. An oral examination is particularly important to conduct if you are a tobacco user, since you are at an increased risk of developing oral cancer.

8. Visit your dentist regularly.

The standard recommendation is to visit your dentist twice a year for check-ups and cleanings. Talk with your dentist about the frequency that is best for you considering your oral health situation.

9. Develop a partnership with your dentist.

Don’t be afraid to ask your dentist for more information if you don’t understand a treatment or procedure. You should be able to have a free and frank discussion with your dentist about the following types of issues:

  • What are the treatment options for a particular dental condition?
  • How do these options differ in cost and in their durability?
  • Do all the options solve the problem? What are the benefits and drawbacks of each option?
  • Of the dental treatments being recommended, which are absolutely necessary, which are less urgent, which are elective, and which are merely cosmetic?
  • What are the consequences of delaying treatment?
  • How much will the treatment cost?
  • When is payment due?
  • What method of payment does your dentist expect?
  • Do you have a clear understanding of all fees and methods and schedules of payment?

Novy Scheinfeld DDS PC 5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmileacworth.com

info@rightsmilecenter.comFurther Reading:

Related articles

Dentist: Woodstock: Bottled Water – Good or Bad?

According to the ADA the majority of bottled water does not contain optimal levels of fluoride to protect your teeth against harmful bacteria.  In addition, some types of home water treatment systems also reduce the fluoride levels decreasing the decay-preventive effects of tap water.  The absence of fluoride is not to be inferred as some kind of public or private ban on the use of fluoridation, because this is not the case.  And with respect to your oral health, when used appropriately, fluoride is both safe and effective and probably your best means of preventing and controlling dental caries.  So how do you use fluoride to achieve the maximum protection against dental caries and efficiently reducing the likelihood of enamel fluorosis?  There are numerous fluoride modalities that are effective, inexpensive, readily available, and can be used in both private and public health settings.  And if left unchecked, the resulting bacteria can penetrate dissolved surfaces, attack the underlying dentin, and reach the soft pulp tissue, causing of course tooth decay.  Drinking fluoridated water, brushing with fluoride toothpaste, or using other fluoride dental products can effectively and inexpensively raise the concentration of fluoride in the saliva present in your mouth 100- to 1,000-fold.

Children and adults who are at low risk for dental caries can remain low risk through frequent exposure to small amounts of fluoride by drinking fluoridated water and using fluoride toothpaste.  While children and adults at high risk for dental caries should benefit from additional exposure to fluoride by going one step further and utilizing mouth rinse, dietary supplements, and professionally applied products.  The ADA reviews fluoride products for caries prevention through its voluntary Seal of Acceptance program and accepted products are listed in the ADA Guide to Dental Therapeutics.   At this particular moment in our oral healthcare, fluoride is the only nonprescription toothpaste additive proven to prevent dental caries.   As I have recommended in previous articles, brushing is the simplest and number one action you can take to maintain your teeth and oral hygiene.  This of course should be followed by regular cleanings and checkups with your dentist.

American Dental Association. ADA guide to dental therapeutics. 1st ed. Chicago, IL: American Dental Association, 1998.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

Related articles

Woodstock Dentist: I read this on Webmd.com

…. and thought it was a very practical approach to your dental care:

 

Your Oral Health Care Plan

Good oral health involves more than just brushing. To keep your teeth and mouth healthy for a lifetime of use, there are steps that you should follow. Here’s what you should consider:

1. Understand your own oral health needs.

Talk with your dentist, other oral health care specialist, or hygienist about any special conditions in your mouth and any ways in which your medical/health conditions affect your teeth or oral health. For example, cancer treatments, pregnancy, heart diseases, diabetes, dental appliances (dentures, braces) can all impact your oral health and may necessitate a change in the care of your mouth and/or teeth. Be sure to tell your dentist if you have experienced a change in your general health or in any medications you are taking since your last dental visit.

2. Develop, then follow, a daily oral health routine.

Based on discussions with your dentist, other oral health care specialist, and hygienist and considering your unique general health and oral health situations, develop an oral health routine that is easy to follow on a daily basis. For example, people with special conditions – such as pregnancy, diabetes and other underlying diseases, orthodontic appliances – may require additional instruction and perhaps treatments to keep their mouth healthy. Make sure you understand the additional care and/or treatment that is needed, commit to the extra tasks, and work them into your daily health routine.

3. Use fluoride.

Children and adults benefit from fluoride use. Fluoride strengthens developing teeth in children and prevents tooth decay in both children and adults. Toothpastes and mouth rinses contain fluoride. Fluoride levels in tap water may not be high enough without supplementation to prevent tooth decay. Contact your water utility to determine the level for your area. Talk with your dentist about your fluoride needs. Ask if fluoride supplements or a higher strength, prescription-only fluoride product is necessary for you.

4. Brush and floss daily.

Brush your teeth at least twice a day (morning and before bed time) and floss at least once a day. Better still would be to brush after every meal and snack. These activities remove plaque, which if not removed, combines with sugars to form acids that lead to tooth decay. Bacterial plaque also causes gum disease and other periodontal diseases.

5. Eat a balanced diet and limit snacking.

Eat a variety of foods, but eat fewer foods that contain sugars and starches (for example, cookies, cakes, pies, candies, ice cream, dried fruits and raisins, soft drinks, potato chips). These foods produce the most acids in the mouth, which begin the decay process. If you must snack, brush your teeth afterward or chew sugarless gum.

6. If you use tobacco products, quit.

Smoking cigarettes or using smokeless tobacco products increases your risk of oral cancer and cancers of the larynx, pharynx and esophagus; gum disease; as well as causes bad breath, tooth discoloration, and contribute to other oral and general health problems.

7. Examine your mouth regularly.

Become familiar with the appearance of your own mouth and teeth through frequent examination. This way, you will be able to catch any changes at an early stage and have these changes examined by a dentist. Look for the development of any spots, lesions, cuts, swellings, or growths on your gums, tongue, cheeks, inside of your lips, and floor and roof of your mouth. Examine your teeth for any signs of chipping or cracking, discoloration, and looseness. If you experience a change in your bite or develop pain, call your dentist as soon as possible. An oral examination is particularly important to conduct if you are a tobacco user, since you are at an increased risk of developing oral cancer.

8. Visit your dentist regularly.

The standard recommendation is to visit your dentist twice a year for check-ups and cleanings. Talk with your dentist about the frequency that is best for you considering your oral health situation.

9. Develop a partnership with your dentist.

Don’t be afraid to ask your dentist for more information if you don’t understand a treatment or procedure. You should be able to have a free and frank discussion with your dentist about the following types of issues:

  • What are the treatment options for a particular dental condition?
  • How do these options differ in cost and in their durability?
  • Do all the options solve the problem? What are the benefits and drawbacks of each option?
  • Of the dental treatments being recommended, which are absolutely necessary, which are less urgent, which are elective, and which are merely cosmetic?
  • What are the consequences of delaying treatment?
  • How much will the treatment cost?
  • When is payment due?
  • What method of payment does your dentist expect?
  • Do you have a clear understanding of all fees and methods and schedules of payment?

Novy Scheinfeld DDS PC 5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.comFurther Reading:

Related articles

Atlanta Dentistry: Bottled Water – Good or Bad?

According to the ADA the majority of bottled water does not contain optimal levels of fluoride to protect your teeth against harmful bacteria.  In addition, some types of home water treatment systems also reduce the fluoride levels decreasing the decay-preventive effects of tap water.  The absence of fluoride is not to be inferred as some kind of public or private ban on the use of fluoridation, because this is not the case.  And with respect to your oral health, when used appropriately, fluoride is both safe and effective and probably your best means of preventing and controlling dental caries.  So how do you use fluoride to achieve the maximum protection against dental caries and efficiently reducing the likelihood of enamel fluorosis?  There are numerous fluoride modalities that are effective, inexpensive, readily available, and can be used in both private and public health settings.  And if left unchecked, the resulting bacteria can penetrate dissolved surfaces, attack the underlying dentin, and reach the soft pulp tissue, causing of course tooth decay.  Drinking fluoridated water, brushing with fluoride toothpaste, or using other fluoride dental products can effectively and inexpensively raise the concentration of fluoride in the saliva present in your mouth 100- to 1,000-fold.

Children and adults who are at low risk for dental caries can remain low risk through frequent exposure to small amounts of fluoride by drinking fluoridated water and using fluoride toothpaste.  While children and adults at high risk for dental caries should benefit from additional exposure to fluoride by going one step further and utilizing mouth rinse, dietary supplements, and professionally applied products.  The ADA reviews fluoride products for caries prevention through its voluntary Seal of Acceptance program and accepted products are listed in the ADA Guide to Dental Therapeutics.   At this particular moment in our oral healthcare, fluoride is the only nonprescription toothpaste additive proven to prevent dental caries.   As I have recommended in previous articles, brushing is the simplest and number one action you can take to maintain your teeth and oral hygiene.  This of course should be followed by regular cleanings and checkups with your dentist.

American Dental Association. ADA guide to dental therapeutics. 1st ed. Chicago, IL: American Dental Association, 1998.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs) GA, 30328

404-256-3620

receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Atlanta Dentist: I read this on Webmd.com

…. and thought it was a very practical approach to your dental care:

 

Just checking to see if your paying attention.

Your Oral Health Care Plan

Good oral health involves more than just brushing. To keep your teeth and mouth healthy for a lifetime of use, there are steps that you should follow. Here’s what you should consider:

1. Understand your own oral health needs.

Talk with your dentist, other oral health care specialist, or hygienist about any special conditions in your mouth and any ways in which your medical/health conditions affect your teeth or oral health. For example, cancer treatments, pregnancy, heart diseases, diabetes, dental appliances (dentures, braces) can all impact your oral health and may necessitate a change in the care of your mouth and/or teeth. Be sure to tell your dentist if you have experienced a change in your general health or in any medications you are taking since your last dental visit.

2. Develop, then follow, a daily oral health routine.

Based on discussions with your dentist, other oral health care specialist, and hygienist and considering your unique general health and oral health situations, develop an oral health routine that is easy to follow on a daily basis. For example, people with special conditions – such as pregnancy, diabetes and other underlying diseases, orthodontic appliances – may require additional instruction and perhaps treatments to keep their mouth healthy. Make sure you understand the additional care and/or treatment that is needed, commit to the extra tasks, and work them into your daily health routine.

3. Use fluoride.

Children and adults benefit from fluoride use. Fluoride strengthens developing teeth in children and prevents tooth decay in both children and adults. Toothpastes and mouth rinses contain fluoride. Fluoride levels in tap water may not be high enough without supplementation to prevent tooth decay. Contact your water utility to determine the level for your area. Talk with your dentist about your fluoride needs. Ask if fluoride supplements or a higher strength, prescription-only fluoride product is necessary for you.

4. Brush and floss daily.

Brush your teeth at least twice a day (morning and before bed time) and floss at least once a day. Better still would be to brush after every meal and snack. These activities remove plaque, which if not removed, combines with sugars to form acids that lead to tooth decay. Bacterial plaque also causes gum disease and other periodontal diseases.

5. Eat a balanced diet and limit snacking.

Eat a variety of foods, but eat fewer foods that contain sugars and starches (for example, cookies, cakes, pies, candies, ice cream, dried fruits and raisins, soft drinks, potato chips). These foods produce the most acids in the mouth, which begin the decay process. If you must snack, brush your teeth afterward or chew sugarless gum.

6. If you use tobacco products, quit.

Smoking cigarettes or using smokeless tobacco products increases your risk of oral cancer and cancers of the larynx, pharynx and esophagus; gum disease; as well as causes bad breath, tooth discoloration, and contribute to other oral and general health problems.

7. Examine your mouth regularly.

Become familiar with the appearance of your own mouth and teeth through frequent examination. This way, you will be able to catch any changes at an early stage and have these changes examined by a dentist. Look for the development of any spots, lesions, cuts, swellings, or growths on your gums, tongue, cheeks, inside of your lips, and floor and roof of your mouth. Examine your teeth for any signs of chipping or cracking, discoloration, and looseness. If you experience a change in your bite or develop pain, call your dentist as soon as possible. An oral examination is particularly important to conduct if you are a tobacco user, since you are at an increased risk of developing oral cancer.

8. Visit your dentist regularly.

The standard recommendation is to visit your dentist twice a year for check-ups and cleanings. Talk with your dentist about the frequency that is best for you considering your oral health situation.

9. Develop a partnership with your dentist.

Don’t be afraid to ask your dentist for more information if you don’t understand a treatment or procedure. You should be able to have a free and frank discussion with your dentist about the following types of issues:

  • What are the treatment options for a particular dental condition?
  • How do these options differ in cost and in their durability?
  • Do all the options solve the problem? What are the benefits and drawbacks of each option?
  • Of the dental treatments being recommended, which are absolutely necessary, which are less urgent, which are elective, and which are merely cosmetic?
  • What are the consequences of delaying treatment?
  • How much will the treatment cost?
  • When is payment due?
  • What method of payment does your dentist expect?
  • Do you have a clear understanding of all fees and methods and schedules of payment?

Novy Scheinfeld DDS PC
290 Carpenter Drive, 200A
Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328
(404) 256-3620
receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com
rightsmilecenter.com
Further Reading:

Related articles

Alpharetta Dentist: I read this on Webmd.com

Toothbrush, photo taken in Sweden
Image via Wikipedia

 

…. and thought it was a very practical approach to your dental care:

 

Your Oral Health Care Plan

Good oral health involves more than just brushing. To keep your teeth and mouth healthy for a lifetime of use, there are steps that you should follow. Here’s what you should consider:

1. Understand your own oral health needs.

Talk with your dentist, other oral health care specialist, or hygienist about any special conditions in your mouth and any ways in which your medical/health conditions affect your teeth or oral health. For example, cancer treatments, pregnancy, heart diseases, diabetes, dental appliances (dentures, braces) can all impact your oral health and may necessitate a change in the care of your mouth and/or teeth. Be sure to tell your dentist if you have experienced a change in your general health or in any medications you are taking since your last dental visit.

2. Develop, then follow, a daily oral health routine.

Based on discussions with your dentist, other oral health care specialist, and hygienist and

 

considering your unique general health and oral health situations, develop an oral health routine that is easy to follow on a daily basis. For example, people with special conditions – such as pregnancy, diabetes and other underlying diseases, orthodontic appliances – may require additional instruction and perhaps treatments to keep their mouth healthy. Make sure you understand the additional care and/or treatment that is needed, commit to the extra tasks, and work them into your daily health routine.

3. Use fluoride.

Children and adults benefit from fluoride use. Fluoride strengthens developing teeth in children and prevents tooth decay in both children and adults. Toothpastes and mouth rinses contain fluoride. Fluoride levels in tap water may not be high enough without supplementation to prevent tooth decay. Contact your water utility to determine the level for your area. Talk with your dentist about your fluoride needs. Ask if fluoride supplements or a higher strength, prescription-only fluoride product is necessary for you.

4. Brush and floss daily.

Brush your teeth at least twice a day (morning and before bed time) and floss at least once a day. Better still would be to brush after every meal and snack. These activities remove plaque, which if not removed, combines with sugars to form acids that lead to tooth decay. Bacterial plaque also causes gum disease and other periodontal diseases.

5. Eat a balanced diet and limit snacking.

Eat a variety of foods, but eat fewer foods that contain sugars and starches (for example, cookies, cakes, pies, candies, ice cream, dried fruits and raisins, soft drinks, potato chips). These foods produce the most acids in the mouth, which begin the decay process. If you must snack, brush your teeth afterward or chew sugarless gum.

6. If you use tobacco products, quit.

Smoking cigarettes or using smokeless tobacco products increases your risk of oral cancer and cancers of the larynx, pharynx and esophagus; gum disease; as well as causes bad breath, tooth discoloration, and contributes to other oral and general health problems.

7. Examine your mouth regularly.

Become familiar with the appearance of your own mouth and teeth through frequent examination. This way, you will be able to catch any changes at an early stage and have these changes examined by a dentist. Look for the development of any spots, lesions, cuts, swellings, or growths on your gums, tongue, cheeks, inside of your lips, and floor and roof of your mouth. Examine your teeth for any signs of chipping or cracking, discoloration, and looseness. If you experience a change in your bite or develop pain, call your dentist as soon as possible. An oral examination is particularly important to conduct if you are a tobacco user, since you are at an increased risk of developing oral cancer.

8. Visit your dentist regularly.

The standard recommendation is to visit your dentist twice a year for check-ups and cleanings. Talk with your dentist about the frequency that is best for you considering your oral health situation.

9. Develop a partnership with your dentist.

Don’t be afraid to ask your dentist for more information if you don’t understand a treatment or procedure. You should be able to have a free and frank discussion with your dentist about the following types of issues:

  • What are the treatment options for a particular dental condition?
  • How do these options differ in cost and in their durability?
  • Do all the options solve the problem? What are the benefits and drawbacks of each option?
  • Of the dental treatments being recommended, which are absolutely necessary, which are less urgent, which are elective, and which are merely cosmetic?
  • What are the consequences of delaying treatment?
  • How much will the treatment cost?
  • When is payment due?
  • What method of payment does your dentist expect?
  • Do you have a clear understanding of all fees and methods and schedules of payment?
  • Novy Scheinfeld DDS PC
    290 Carpenter Drive, 200A
    Atlanta, GA 30328
    (404) 256-3620
    receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com
    rightsmilecenter.com
    Further Reading:

Related articles