Dentist Woodstock: Top 4 Reasons Not to play hooky from Your Dental Cleanings

Sure, regular cleanings with our office promotes good oral hygiene, but did you know these visits also screen for a multitude of diseases? Getting your teeth cleaned and having your doctor’s exam may not rank up there with an afternoon on the course or ditching work to enjoy a matinee, but it may be well worth it for your overall health. Here are 4 really great reasons to see your dentist for your regularly scheduled cleanings.

  1. It’s an opportunity to check for Oral Cancer. You may or may not realize that you’re screened for oral cancer during your regular dental cleaning but you are. According to the Oral Cancer Foundation, an American dies of oral cancer every hour of every day. It’s a sad proposition, especially when you consider that it is highly curable with early diagnosis.
  2. Your gums are being checked for Gum Disease. Gum disease, or an infection in the gum tissues and bone that keep your teeth in place, is one of the leading causes of adult tooth loss. It can be treated and reversed if diagnosed early. Unfortunately, not receiving treatment will lead to a more serious and advanced state of gum disease. Regular cleanings and check-ups along with daily brushing and flossing are key defenses against gum disease.
  3. Your overall health. Studies have linked heart attacks, diabetes detection and strokes to gum disease associated with poor oral hygiene.  A trip to your dentist at least every 6 months and in some cases more often, could reduce your risk of other serious health issues.
  4. Early detection of Dental Problems. We’ve already touched upon early detection of gum disease and oral cancer, but don’t overlook more basic dental problems. Cavities and broken fillings are easy to treat. Without regular check-ups, undetected problems can lead to more serious issues like root canals, gum surgery and tooth extraction.   An ounce of prevention verses a pound of cure.

So you haven’t been keeping up with what current research has to say about caring for your teeth.  That’s why check-ups allow your dentist to examine your mouth and keep you on the right path.  If it’s been more than 6 months since your last check up and cleaning, call your dentist to schedule an appointment today.  If we can be of any help or answer any questions please feel free to drop us a line.

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC             

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Woodstock: Towne Lake: 8 Windows your overall health sees through dentistry.

I read this article the other day by the Mayo Clinic staff and it appears very much worth republishing.  Please read this and adjust your life accordingly.  It’s really not that difficult to lead a healthy life style and live longer lives.

Oral health: A window to your overall health

Your oral health is more important than you may realize. Get the facts about how the health of your mouth, teeth and gums may affect your general health.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Did you know that your oral health can offer clues about your overall health? Or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Understand the intimate connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.

What’s the connection between oral health and overall health?

Your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless. Normally the body’s natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, harmful bacteria can sometimes grow out of control and cause oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease. In addition, dental procedures, medications, or treatments that reduce saliva flow, disrupt the normal balance of bacteria in your mouth or breach the mouth’s normal protective barriers may make it easier for bacteria to enter your bloodstream.

What conditions may be linked to oral health?

Your oral health may affect, be affected by or contribute to various diseases and conditions, including:

  • Endocarditis. Gum disease and dental procedures that cut your gums may allow bacteria to enter your bloodstream. If you have a weak immune system or a damaged heart valve, this can cause infection in other parts of the body — such as an infection of the inner lining of the heart (endocarditis).
  • Cardiovascular disease. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke may be linked to oral bacteria, possibly due to chronic inflammation from periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Gum disease has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes reduces the body’s resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk. In addition, people who have inadequate blood sugar control may develop more-frequent and severe infections of the gums and the bone that holds teeth in place, and they may lose more teeth than do people who have good blood sugar control.
  • HIV/AIDS. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.
  • Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — may be associated with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.
  • Alzheimer’s disease. Tooth loss before age 35 may be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Other conditions. Other conditions that may be linked to oral health include Sjogren’s syndrome — an immune system disorder — and eating disorders.

Be sure to tell your dentist if you’re taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you’ve had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition.

How can I protect my oral health?

To protect your oral health, resolve to practice good oral hygiene every day. For example:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three to four months.
  • Floss daily.
  • Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Schedule regular dental checkups.

Also, watch for signs and symptoms of oral disease and contact your dentist as soon as a problem arises. Remember, taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health. Pasted from <http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dental/DE00001/NSECTIONGROUP=2>

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Woodstock – 4 Steps to Promoting Good Oral Health

Good oral hygiene is important for maintaining one’s overall health.  If you believe this and you should, then there are 4 essential guidelines of preventative care to maintaining good oral health, all of which are endorsed by the American Dental Association:

  1. Floss regularly and floss first- It is recommended that individuals floss on a regular basis after meals and before brushing their teeth.  The reason to floss first is to dislodge any food particles trapped in between your teeth, which can be disposed of while brushing.  The proper way to floss is to push the floss gently between your teeth to the gum to loosen debris your toothbrush cannot reach. Initially, you may experience some light bleeding but this should disappear once your gums get used to the flossing process.

 

  1. Brushing your teeth- If you don’t have an electric toothbrush, good brushing by hand should take a minimum of 2 minutes and should involve brushing in a circular motion, which the electric toothbrush does for you.  You work your way from one side of the mouth to the other, keeping in mind to pay attention to certain neglected areas such as the very back teeth and your tongue. Dentists recommend using soft bristle brushes and toothpaste that contain fluoride.  The fluoride is important, because the rise in the consumption of bottled water has led to the population’s decline in fluoride intake.

 

  1. Mouthwash- I am not sure how effective this is, but if you’re not going to brush twice a day, using a mouthwash that contains fluoride at least twice a day is a good preventative measure that kills the bacteria responsible for cavities and gum disease.  Given recent research, you might want to choose a non-alcohol based rinse.

 

  1. Your Dental visits- Maintaining your oral health requires regular dental visits at least every six months.  You need to do this for early detection of potential global health problems that could develop into more serious issues and the hygienist can clean areas that might have been missed or that were resistant to the 3 steps above.

Finally, Finding a Dentist that is Right for You

Research shows that your dental care is an important aspect of your overall general health care.  So you need to make sure you find a dentist that is right for you. This can be a difficult process.  Look for someone who’s competent and you feel comfortable with, one you can have a collaborative relationship with. This is important because there are conditions and problems that were not discussed in this article that the dentist will need to pay attention to during your regular checkups. Hopefully after reading this article, you will have a better understanding of the basics for good oral health.   I you have questions or concerns feel free to contact or call.

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road,

Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

 

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