Tooth Root Exposed? Not good… Dentist Sandy Springs

Sandy Springs Dentist root exposureAre you the patient coming in with severe gum recession where the root is exposed in front of your tooth?  You don’t have symptoms, yet, it just looks strange and you want to know if there is a problem.  We’re a multi-specialty practice with in-house periodontal treatment.  And in a healthy mouth, the tooth roots are not exposed.  If they are exposed, it’s usually a sign of one of these problems:

  • Gingivitis or Periodontitis.  Gum disease can cause the gum tissue to pull away from the tooth, and expose the root.
  • Brushing too hard.  Aggressive tooth brushing can cause the gums to recede.  We recommend soft tooth brushes to prevent this from happening.  Soft tooth brushes used properly minimize the trauma to the tissue and bone.
  • And on rare occasions tooth developed outside of the jaw bone.  In this case, we highly recommend seeing a periodontist to determine the best form of treatment.

So if you have an exposed tooth root, you need to see us at one of our two officesOur dental team will determine the quality and quantity of the gum tissue that remains.  If the gum recession is caught early, the tissue can be treated until healthy, replaced and your tooth may have an excellent prognosis.

We offer complimentary consultations.  Please allow us to help you if your gums are receding.  Call now for your free consult.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Atlanta’s most respected Prosthodontist — therightsmile.wordpress.com

 

Dentist Chamblee: Dental Implants 101

dental-implants2Dental Implants have changed the face of dentistry.  What used to be a difficult procedure is now the standard of care. As with most treatment procedures today, dental implants not only involve scientific discovery, research and understanding, but also application in a practical sense.[1]  The practice of implant dentistry requires expertise in planning, surgery and tooth restoration.  The role of a prosthodontist as the ‘quarterback’ in the process is as much about their art and experience as it is about their post graduate training.

The dental implant is actually a replacement for the root or roots of a missing tooth. And like tooth roots, dental implants are secured in the jawbone in a process known as osseo-integration.  Hidden beneath the gum-line, they are used to secure crowns (the parts of teeth seen in the mouth), bridgework or dentures by a various design means. They are made of titanium, which is lightweight and strong, but most importantly, they are biocompatible, which means that it is not rejected by the body.[2]

Titanium’s special property of fusing to bone is the biological basis of dental implant success.  Placing dental implants stabilizes the existing jawbone.  Along with replacing lost teeth, implants help maintain the jawbone’s shape and density, ensuring your facial skeleton is also maintained. This means they also support indirectly, the soft tissue structures — gum tissues, cheeks and lips. Dental implants help you eat, chew, smile, talk and look completely natural, transitioning the patient to a well maintained physical appearance.[3]

So the final question is ‘are you a candidate for dental implants’?  If we can be of service please do not hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Thank you for all your referrals.  We truly appreciate them.

Information included is not dental or medical advice.  For your specific information

 be sure to consult your dentist.


[1] International Congress of Oral Implantologists – http://www.dentalimplants.com/

[2] Ibid

[3] Ibid

Dentist Buckhead: Women and Oral Health

sandy springs chamblee dentist near meAs a woman, you know that your health needs are unique, including your oral health needs. And because your needs are unique, you need to take extra care of yourself.  While women tend to take better care of their oral health than men do, women’s oral health is not significantly better than men’s.  This is because hormonal fluctuations throughout a woman’s life can affect many tissues, including gum tissue.  These fluctuations occur when you mature and change, as you do during puberty or menopause, or other times when you have special health needs, such as menstruation and particularly during pregnancy.

According to the Journal of Periodontology[1] at least 23 percent of women between the ages 30 to 54 have periodontitis.[2]  And, 44 percent of women ages 55 to 90 who still have their teeth have periodontitis.  Yet many women do not realize they have it until it reaches an advanced state, which is why regular hygiene check-ups are so important.

Stages of your life – steps to protect your oral health.

Puberty – an increased level of sex hormones, such as progesterone and possibly estrogen, causes increased blood circulation to the gums. This may cause an increase in the gum’s sensitivity and lead to a greater reaction to any irritation, including food particles and plaque. Signs to look for in your teenage daughter are swollen, red and/or tender gums.[3]

It is particularly important during this time in your daughter’s life to make sure she follows a good at-home oral hygiene regimen, including regular brushing and flossing, and regular dental care. In some cases, a dental professional may recommend periodontal therapy to help prevent damage to the tissues and bone surrounding the teeth.[4]

Menstruation – can result in menstruation gingivitis.  Women with this condition may experience bleeding gums, bright red and swollen gums and sores on the inside of the cheek. Menstruation gingivitis typically occurs right before a woman’s period and clears up once her period has started.  Sometimes it occurs concurrent with stressful situations and menstruation.

Pregnancy – increase gingivitis or pregnancy gingivitis beginning in the second or third month of pregnancy that increases in severity throughout the eighth month. During this time, some women may notice swelling, bleeding, redness or tenderness in the gum tissue.[5] As a result of varying hormone levels, between 50%-70% of women will develop gingivitis sometime during their pregnancy – a condition called pregnancy gingivitis.[6] In some cases, gums swollen by pregnancy gingivitis can react strongly to irritants and form large lumps. These growths, called pregnancy tumors, are not cancerous and generally painless.

Studies have shown a possible relationship between periodontal disease and pre-term, low-birth-weight babies. Any infection, including periodontal infection, is cause for concern during pregnancy. In fact, pregnant women who have periodontal disease may be more likely to have a baby that is born too early and too small!

To prevent pregnancy gingivitis it’s especially important to practice good oral hygiene habits, which include brushing at least twice a day, flossing once a day, and using an antimicrobial mouth rinse. If you are due for a professional cleaning, don’t skip it simply because you are pregnant.  Now more than ever, professional dental cleanings are particularly important.

Oral contraceptives – while women are taking drugs to help treat periodontal disease, such as antibiotics, may lessen the effect of an oral contraceptive.  So be sure and consult your dentist about all the medications you are taking.

Menopause and Post-Menopause – not surprising given all the changes happening within your body, but you may experience changes in your mouth as well.  You may notice discomfort such as dry mouth, pain and burning sensations in the gum tissue and altered taste, particularly to salt and pepper.

In addition, menopausal gingivostomatitis affects a small percentage of women. Gums that look dry or shiny or bleed easily and range from abnormally pale to deep red may indicate this condition. Most women find that estrogen supplements help to relieve these symptoms.[7]

Bone loss is potentially associated with both periodontal disease and osteoporosis. Women considering Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) to help fight osteoporosis should note that this may help protect their teeth and your jawbone as well as other parts of the body.

What Should You Do?

See a dental professional for cleaning at least twice a year – you need to monitor your oral health.

If referred, see a periodontist in your area. Problems may include: Bleeding gums during brushing, red, swollen or tender gums.   Other issues such as persistent bad breath or pus between the teeth and gums.  If you’re a denture wearer a change in the fit of your dentures may occur.

Keep your dentist informed about any medications you are taking and any changes in your health history.

Brush and floss properly every day.  Review your techniques with a dental professional.

If there any questions that you might have, please call us to discuss them.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1] January 1999 issue of the Journal of Periodontology

[2] Periodontitis is an advanced state of periodontal disease in which there is active destruction of the periodontal supporting tissues.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] WebMd. Pregnancy Gingivitis and Pregnancy Tumors.

[7] Women and Gums: American Academy of Periodontology Journal. http://www.perio.org/consumer/women.htm.

Alpharetta Dentist: Green Tea and Your Oral Health

Green teaDrinking green tea is in style, but guess what, it may also be good for your teeth.  A recent study found that those who regularly drank green tea had better oral health than those who didn’t.[1]  Examining three indicators of gum disease, researchers found that for every cup of green tea consumed per day, a decrease in all three indicators occurred.[2]

In the study, the researchers examined 940 men ages 49 through 59 on the three indicators of gum disease by measuring the pocket depth between the gums and tooth, loss of the bone attachment of the tooth and probing bleeding gums[3]. They found that the men who had regular intake of green tea had healthier gums and teeth than those who drank less green tea. They noted that a cup a day increase in consumption resulted in the shrinking of the above indicators or symptoms.

Unlike black tea, green tea is not fermented, so its active ingredients remain unaltered. Green tea’s protection comes from a powerful antioxidant, a polyphenol called EGCG.[4]

Because our mouths are an oxygen-rich environment closely connected to our blood vessels, they provide an ideal habitat for the growth and rapid proliferation of cancer cells. Scientists have confirmed that green tea not only halts the growth of new oral cancer cells but actually breaks down and kills existing oral cancer cells.  A double-blind study of people with leukoplakia (a precancerous oral condition), showed that those in the green tea group compared to those in the placebo group had significant decreases in the pre-cancerous condition.[5]

This is why we examine your mouth closely at each visit to determine any changes in texture or color that might indicate the presence of oral cancers. This early screening is just one more reason to make sure you don’t miss your regular checkup.

Ingredients in green tea may reduce the risk of getting dental cavities. One study compared two groups. The one that rinsed each night with an alcohol extract of oolong tea leaves had significantly less plaque formation than the group that did not.[6]

Another benefit of green tea is that it stunts the growth of odor causing bacteria, thus helping you maintain a fresh breath.

To fully obtain the benefits, we should have at least four to six cups a day.  Decaffeinated tea is recommended to reduce the side effects associated with caffeine, including anxiety and insomnia.  This seems like an awful lot of tea to ingest, so if you don’t want to drink that much, simply use it as a mouthwash.

If we can be of assistance or answer any of your questions or concerns feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com


[1] Journal of Periodontology, March 2009, Vol. 80, No. 3, Pages 372-377 , DOI 10.1902/jop.2009.080510

[2] Ibid

[3] These 3 methods of examining gum tissue are the most common methods utilized by your dentist when you have your teeth cleaned.

[4] Graham HN. Green tea consumption, and polyphenol chemistry. Prev Med 1992;21:334-50.

[5] Li N, Sun Z, Han C, Chen J. The chemopreventive effects of tea on human oral precancerous mucosa lesions. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1999;220:218-24.

[6] Otake S, Makimura M, Kuroki t, et al. Anticaries effects of polyphenolic compounds from Japanese green tea. Caries Res 1991;25:438-43.

Dentist Alpharetta: Am I a Dental Implant Candidate?

dental-implants2Anyone who is missing one or more teeth may be a candidate for dental implants. The determining factor is the amount of available bone left to place an implant.  The ideal candidate is in good global as well as good oral health. Your dentist is the best person to evaluate whether dental implants are a viable solution for you.

The best candidates have both bone and gum tissue sufficient to accept a dental implant, because they are intimately connected.  While oral surgeons are highly trained to install implants, a periodontist may be involved to evaluate the gums, the bone structure and place the implant.

It’s not acceptable to proceed with dental implants if there are issues of untreated disease in the teeth, gums or bone.  These circumstances can adversely affect the success of osseo-intergration and maintenance of the implant itself.  As a matter of course, a full mouth evaluation needs to done, as well as the appropriate x-rays need to be taken.

Occasionally, older patients express concern that their age may prevent them from enjoying the benefits of dental implants.  The patient’s overall health is more of a determining factor than age.  If you’re healthy enough to have a tooth extracted, you’re probably healthy enough to receive dental implants. Certain chronic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus[1], may contraindicate dental implant treatment.

Your dentist should determine if you’re a candidate after careful evaluation of your dental & health history.  If we can be of service or you are interested in determining whether or not you are a candidate for implants, please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles


[1] Diabetes, Smoking, Osteoporosis, loss of salivary function, and Sjogrens disease may present factors that affect the viability of dental implants.

Dentist Alpharetta: Seniors Can Keep Their Teeth for a Lifetime

Sandy Springs Chamblee Dentist near meSurveys by the American Dental Association and Oral B® reveal that 7 in 10 respondents 65 years of age and older visit their dentist at least once a year and almost all said they believe that healthy teeth and gums are important. It’s great to know that seniors are concerned about their oral health, because dental needs change as we age.

Unfortunately, cavities are not just for kids.  All throughout our lives, carbohydrate-containing foods team up with bacteria in the mouth to produce cavity-forming acids.  Seniors often have receding gums that expose the sensitive roots of the teeth to cavities.[1]  These cavities should be filled as soon as possible to avoid further damage to the teeth.  Seniors should try to brush teeth 2-3 times a day and floss at least once daily.  To reduce the risk of cavities, it is recommended to use fluoride toothpaste and a mouth-rinse containing fluoride.[2]

Periodontal disease or gum disease is the main reason people lose their teeth. Gum disease is caused by plaque, a bacterial film that continuously forms around the teeth. Although gum disease is often painless until it is very advanced, some signs of gum disease include: bleeding gums after eating or brushing your teeth, persistent bad breath; swollen gums; loose teeth; a change in the fit of partial dentures; or permanent tooth loss.

The effects of gum disease become cumulative as we age.  And as much you participate in maintaining a healthy mouth, only your dentist or hygienist can clean the plaque and tartar under the gum line to help reduce the damage of gum disease. As with cavity prevention, daily brushing and flossing are essential. Regular dental cleanings and dental exams are important. Seniors with gum disease should see their dentist 3-4 times a year, regardless of your insurance coverage.

Seniors who have worn dentures for many years may find that they don’t seem to fit as well anymore. Loose dentures make it difficult to eat and speak (they seem to make a “clacking” noise), and do not support the face as well.  This is going to be a result of bone recession.  Your dentist can sometimes remedy the problem by relining the denture, but a new denture should be made every 5-7 years, or when the dentures cannot be used comfortably.

If we can be of help, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 


[1] Check on the tongue side of teeth and look for a receding gum line.  Or has the gum that used to fill the gap between your teeth opened to the point that now there’s a dark void between your teeth.  These are signs of your gum recession.

[2] In addition, you’re really not too old to have sealants painted on your teeth.

Dunwoody Dentist: What are periodontal disease causes?

Sandy Springs dentist near mePeriodontal diseases are bacterial gum infections that destroy the gums and supporting bone that hold your teeth in your mouth. The disease which can be caused by multiple factors can affect one tooth or many teeth.

The main cause is bacterial plaque, a sticky, whitish film that constantly forms on your teeth. If it is not removed, it can turn into a hard substance called calculus or tartar in less than 48 hours. Tartar is so hard it can only be removed by an oral health professional, such as a dentist or dental hygienist. The bacteria in plaque infect the gums, and release poisons that cause redness and inflammation around your teeth.  The inflammation and poisons cause the destruction of the tissues that support your teeth. Once this happens, the gums separate from the teeth, forming pockets that fill with even more plaque causing even deeper and more infection.

The disease is multi-factorial.  Meaning, there is not just one cause of periodontal diseases but rather multiple factors that can affect the oral health of your gums.

● SYSTEMIC DISEASES that interfere with the body’s immune system may adversely affect the condition of the gums and supporting bone.

● POOR NUTRITION can make it difficult for the body’s immune system to fight off infection.

● GENETICS and family history of periodontal diseases suggest a propensity for developing these diseases.

● TOBACCO use significantly increases the risk of developing periodontal diseases and can thwart treatment.

● HORMONAL CHANGES in women during pregnancy, puberty and menopause can cause the gums to become inflamed and bleed easily.

● POOR ORAL HYGIENE technique, oral piercing, drug or alcohol abuse can affect periodontal health.

● STRESS can make it more difficult for the body to fight off infection, including periodontal diseases.

● Some MEDICATIONS such as oral contraceptives, antidepressants and certain heart medicine can affect oral health.

Dr. Orland trained in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of periodontal diseases, and oral inflammation. In addition, Dr. Orland is trained in the diagnosis and treatment of oral pathology.  On the north side of Atlanta, Dr. Orland works in conjunction with Right Smile Center’s prosthodontist Dr. Novy Scheinfeld to provide you with the finest of care in a practice serving 4 decades of patients.  Dr. Orland has a reputation of making your visits calm and soothing. The entire team is dedicated to providing you with the personalized, gentle care that you deserve. If you are in need of a complimentary consult to determine your oral health situation please feel free to contact us.

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A
Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328
404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com
http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

Sandy Springs Dentist: Green Tea and Your Oral Health

Japanese green tea in a modern senchawan bowl.
Japanese green tea in a modern senchawan bowl. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Drinking green tea is in style, but guess what, it may also be good for your teeth.  A recent study found that those who regularly drank green tea had better oral health than those who didn’t.[1]  Examining three indicators of gum disease, researchers found that for every cup of green tea consumed per day, a decrease in all three indicators occurred.[2]

In the study, the researchers examined 940 men ages 49 through 59 on the three indicators of gum disease by measuring the pocket depth between the gums and tooth, loss of the bone attachment of the tooth and probing bleeding gums[3]. They found that the men who had regular intake of green tea had healthier gums and teeth than those who drank less green tea. They noted that a cup a day increase in consumption resulted in the shrinking of the above indicators or symptoms.

Unlike black tea, green tea is not fermented, so its active ingredients remain unaltered. Green tea’s protection comes from a powerful antioxidant, a polyphenol called EGCG.[4]

Because our mouths are an oxygen-rich environment closely connected to our blood vessels, they provide an ideal habitat for the growth and rapid proliferation of cancer cells. Scientists have confirmed that green tea not only halts the growth of new oral cancer cells but actually breaks down and kills existing oral cancer cells.  A double-blind study of people with leukoplakia (a precancerous oral condition), showed that those in the green tea group compared to those in the placebo group had significant decreases in the pre-cancerous condition.[5]

This is why we examine your mouth closely at each visit to determine any changes in texture or color that might indicate the presence of oral cancers. This early screening is just one more reason to make sure you don’t miss your regular checkup.

Ingredients in green tea may reduce the risk of getting dental cavities. One study compared two groups. The one that rinsed each night with an alcohol extract of oolong tea leaves had significantly less plaque formation than the group that did not.[6]

Another benefit of green tea is that it stunts the growth of odor causing bacteria, thus helping you maintain a fresh breath.

To fully obtain the benefits, we should have at least four to six cups a day.  Decaffeinated tea is recommended to reduce the side effects associated with caffeine, including anxiety and insomnia.  This seems like an awful lot of tea to ingest, so if you don’t want to drink that much, simply use it as a mouthwash.

If we can be of assistance or answer any of your questions or concerns feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com


[1] Journal of Periodontology, March 2009, Vol. 80, No. 3, Pages 372-377 , DOI 10.1902/jop.2009.080510

[2] Ibid

[3] These 3 methods of examining gum tissue are the most common methods utilized by your dentist when you have your teeth cleaned.

[4] Graham HN. Green tea consumption, and polyphenol chemistry. Prev Med 1992;21:334-50.

[5] Li N, Sun Z, Han C, Chen J. The chemopreventive effects of tea on human oral precancerous mucosa lesions. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1999;220:218-24.

[6] Otake S, Makimura M, Kuroki t, et al. Anticaries effects of polyphenolic compounds from Japanese green tea. Caries Res 1991;25:438-43.

Dentist Woodstock: Gum disease linked to infertility

According to research presented at the American Academy of Periodontology conference in 2004, gum disease is linked to women who use infertility treatments.[1] The study said women undergoing infertility treatment for more than three menstrual cycles experience increased inflammation and bleeding of the gums. These women also have increased levels of gingival crevicular fluid, which contains tissue breakdown products that may be markers for the progression of gum disease.[2]

The lead author Dr. Cenk M. Haytac, from Cukurova University in Adana, Turkey, postulates that these effects occur because these agents increase body levels of estrogen and the gums apparently are a target for estrogen since they contain estrogen receptors.  Though not definitive, several studies have shown evidence that gum infections are associated with unsuccessful embryo development or the failure of in-vitro fertilization. Poor oral health is as bad for fertility as obesity – delaying conception by about two months says latest research.[3]

Experts at the annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Sweden were presented with evidence how women with gum disease took over seven months to conceive, compared to the usual five months. The researchers believe the underlying cause is inflammation. Unchecked, this can set off a chain of reactions capable of damaging the body’s normal workings.

Periodontal disease has already been linked with heart disease, type 2 diabetes and miscarriage, plus poor sperm quality in men.  An Australian study involving over 3,700 women indicated that those with gum disease had raised blood levels of markers for inflammation.[4]   Although speculative, as a precaution researchers suggest that the treatment of gum disorders might influence the outcome of infertility treatment.  According to Dr. Michael P. Rethman, president of the AAP, “[i]t is reasonable to assume that if low levels of plaque are established and maintained during the infertility treatment, gingival inflammation would not affect the success of infertility treatment,”  “[which] would require meticulous oral hygiene and routine professional cleanings, perhaps at the beginning of each menstrual cycle to ensure the presence of healthy gums.”

Professor Roger Hart advises women trying to get pregnant to get a check-up by their dentist along with other measures like stopping smoking and drinking, maintaining a healthy weight and taking folic acid supplements.  UK fertility expert Dr. Allan Pacey said, “It’s common sense advice really to make sure you are in a healthy condition [including good oral health] if you want to try for a baby.” Around 10% of the population is believed to have severe periodontal disease.[5]

So if you are trying to get pregnant and are unsure of your oral health please see your dentist.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles


[1]Journal of Periodontology, June 2004

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ananya Mandal, MD. Gum Disease Linked to Infertility. (2011)

[4] Professor Roger Hart, of the University of Western Australia.

[5] Gum disease linked to infertility http://www.news-medical.net/news/20110707/Gum-disease-linked-to-infertility.aspx. Screen clipping taken: 8/30/2011 5:09 PM  Posted in: Women’s Health News

Woodstock, GA Dentist: Brush and Floss if you want to keep ‘em.

Often I am asked questions such as how often I should floss and is flossing really necessary.  I am famous for saying “You should only brush and floss the teeth you want to keep!”  Brushing and flossing your teeth are the two most important patient activities you can do to ensure good oral health. 

The goal of brushing and flossing is to reduce or rid your mouth of harmful bacteria that can adversely affect both your gums and teeth. Microscopic bacteria reside in your mouth calling it home, feeding off the food particles left on our teeth.

Bacteria produce acid from their feasting and this acid eats into your tooth enamel creating cavities. Addition toxins are produced from bacteria in plaque that will inflame and irritate your gum tissue. And finally, without proper care the bacteria can also sulfur compounds that create bad breath.

In the most recent studies, poor oral health can be linked to other related health issues that may stem from oral bacteria entering the bloodstream affecting other internal organs.  Regular brushing and flossing removes the plaque and the bacteria plaque contains. Unfortunately, many people think brushing alone is sufficient to rid the mouth of these bacteria.   But flossing is a key component to your good oral hygiene program.

If you do not floss and allow plaque to remain in between teeth it eventually hardens into a substance known as tartar. Unlike plaque which can be easily removed by brushing, tartar can only be removed by your dentist.

Over time, failing to floss will result in irritated and inflamed gums. This condition is known as gingivitis, which if left untreated can progress to periodontal disease domino’ing into gingival recession, bone loss, loose teeth, and so on until ultimately your teeth are lost.

Timely and regular flossing removes the bacteria that escapes the reach of the toothbrush.  Brushing alone only does part of the job.  So you really need to floss. The American Dental Association recommends that you floss at least once a day, but I would suggest once in the morning and once in the evening as the better protocol.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

Related articles