Dentist Sandy Springs: Teeth Get the Glory

Dentist near meA beautiful smile is not just about healthy looking teeth.

Your gums are equally as important.

One out of every two American adults aged 30 and over has periodontal disease, according to the CDC. A study titled Prevalence of Periodontitis in Adults in the United States: 2009 and 2010 estimates that 47.2 percent, or 64.7 million American adults, have mild, moderate or severe periodontitis, the more advanced form of periodontal disease. In adults 65 and older, prevalence rates increase to 70.1 percent. This study is published in the Journal of Dental Research, the official publication of the International and American Associations for Dental Research. And the recent pandemic has made it even worse.

A beautiful smile usually consists of teeth and gums living in perfect harmony with each other.  But the teeth often steal the credit when it comes to beautiful smiles.

Our periodontal practice has always been on the leading edge of patient care.   We can treat gum your disease.  We have always incorporated the newest technology and technique to our patient care, but with our periodontal services, we can to help patients achieve the best dental health possible in the most comfortable, relaxing environment possible – here in our own office.

With that in mind there are many new procedures we can perform in our office, including root planning and scaling, more comprehensive pocket depth monitoring and reducing the improper brushing techniques they may have gone unsupervised when we sent a patient out to a referring specialist.

If we can be of service please contact us for your complimentary consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Sandy Springs: A Healthy Body begins with a Healthy Mouth

Sandy Springs dentist near meOur dentistry is more than just beautiful smiles.  Your eyes may be the window to your soul, but your mouth is the gateway to your body. It’s important to your global health.  We are oral physicians who know that ‘people who keep their teeth live an average of ten years longer than people who lose their teeth’ – Charles Mayo, MD.  90% of systemic diseases have oral manifestations. (AGD, 2002) One of the leading causes of teeth loss is due to periodontal disease and 75% roughly the same number of Americans (73%) who would rather go grocery shopping than floss have some form of periodontal gum disease.  Periodontal infections has been linked to a host of serious diseases, including heart attacks, strokes, cancer, diabetes, respiratory disease, low-birth weight babies, Alzheimer’s disease, accelerated aging and more.  Gum infection and disease is a serious health risk.

Employed adults lose more than 164 million hours of work each year due to oral health problems or dental related visits due to their poor oral health regime.  From the health perspective, a thorough oral examination and cleaning of one’s teeth would have a much more significant impact on your health then fixing cavities.  And yet, from the patient’s perspective a visit to the dentist is more often than not only important in time of pain.

As oral physicians, dentists save lives.  Americans are aware of the importance of eating right, taking dietary supplements, and implementing vigorous exercise regimens to maintain their health and delay aging.  However, most people are still unaware of the amazing health benefits of healthy teeth and the detrimental impact of poor oral hygiene.  Generally, an infection anywhere in the body can be serious, if not deadly…and is usually treated immediately.  Yet, gum disease is often neglected for years and years because the infection is out of sight and usually persists with no pain.

And once gum disease starts it does not usually reverse itself without specialized treatment. You are not “too old for good dental care” because the average 65 year old has 17.3 years of life remaining! How do you know if you have gum disease?  Buy maintaining regular daily oral habits and seeing your dentist.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Alpharetta: We need more BIGGEST LOSERS!!

Overweight woman buttoning up her jeans. Image shot 2010. Exact date unknown.Think twice before taking that next bite.  Because we know that being overweight can affect many aspects of a person’s health.  Now researchers suspect a link exists between obesity and gum disease.  Whether one condition is a risk factor for another or whether one disease directly causes another has yet to be discovered.[1]

What we do know is half of the U.S. population age 30 and older is affected by gum disease — a chronic inflammatory infection that impacts the surrounding and supporting structures of the teeth.[2] Gum disease itself produces its own set of cytokines, which further increases the level of these inflammatory proteins in the body’s bloodstream, helping to set off a chain reaction of other inflammatory diseases throughout the body.[3]  So it is important to visit a dentist at least twice a year so he or she can evaluate your risks for developing gum disease and offer preventive strategies.

Impacting approximately one-third of the U.S. population, obesity has become a significant health concern for Americans.  As a part of your strategy to stay healthy, a dentist can design a personalized program of home oral care to meet your specific needs.  In the meantime, research on the relationship between obesity and gum disease is still ongoing.

If we can be of assistance, give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1] January/February 2013 issue of General Dentistry, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), it also may be a risk factor for gum disease.

[3] Ibid.

Periodontics Sandy Springs: How much does Periodontal Treatment Cost

And will insurance cover it?

Sandy Springs periodontist near meThis is an up and coming issue as our aged` population continues to grow.  While periodontal treatment is not as costly as replacing teeth due to tooth loss, its cost can vary greatly depending upon your needs.  Quite frankly, there is no way of really telling just how advanced your gum disease is without a proper diagnosis.

It can be as simple as gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) or periodontitis (disease of the bone supporting the teeth).  Because periodontal infection grows under your gums, you can have no symptoms at all.  More advanced cases range from red, swollen, tender gums to bad breath to loose or shifting teeth.

As it relates to insurance coverage, the best way to check scaling and root planing or periodontal maintenance is to have us send a pretreatment in for the work that needs to be completed.  Fees for traditional root planing can range from $280 to $385 per quadrant (there are usually 4 quadrants)[1].  Add to this the fees for an antibiotic placed under the gums during treatment.

This antibiotic known as Arestin[2] is charged out at $55-$110 per area.  And if a patient has multiple deep pockets in one quadrant the fees can add up quickly.   Depending on the effectiveness of this approach it may be repeated every few months, annually, or every three years.[3]

If you have dental insurance, they may provide full or partial coverage. Our office is happy to contact your insurance company to learn what they will cover.  We do accept assignment of most insurance benefits. In such cases, your responsibility will be to cover only the remainder. We generally ask that you pay for X-rays, and regular cleanings while we have your statement submitted to your insurance company.

Everyone deserves to keep their natural teeth for a lifetime. We feel that finances never should be an obstacle to treatment. So for your convenience, we offer several payment options and payment plans to suit your individual needs. Our staff will be happy to answer any of your financial or insurance questions.  Don’t let the cost deter your need for treatment. Please give us a call for your complimentary consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

Right Smile Center

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30041

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

[1] However, the cost may be less if less teeth are involved.

[2] ARESTIN is a prescription antibiotic approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is used together with scaling and root planing (SRP) and is placed by your provider for the treatment of periodontal (gum) disease.

[3] http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/rdh/2001/12/journal-of-periodontology-publishes-study-on-effectiveness-of-arestin-on-periodontal-disease.html

Dentist Sandy Springs: Gum disease linked to infertility in women

According to research presented at the American Academy of Periodontology conference in 2004,

gum disease is linked to women who

Angela=ina Jolie Pregnant
Angelina Jolie with child

use infertility treatments.[1] The study said women undergoing infertility treatment for more than three menstrual cycles experience increased inflammation and bleeding of the gums. These women also have increased levels of gingival crevicular fluid, which contains tissue breakdown products that may be markers for the progression of gum disease.[2]

The lead author Dr. Cenk M. Haytac, from Cukurova University in Adana, Turkey, postulates that these effects occur because these agents increase body levels of estrogen and the gums apparently are a target for estrogen since they contain estrogen receptors.  Though not definitive, several studies have shown  evidence that gum infections are associated with unsuccessful embryo development or the failure of in-vitro fertilization. Poor oral health is as bad for
fertility as obesity – delaying conception by about two months says latest research.[3]

Experts at the annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Sweden were presented with evidence how women with gum disease took over seven months to conceive, compared to the usual five months. The researchers believe the underlying cause is inflammation. Unchecked, this can set off a chain of reactions capable of damaging the body’s normal workings.

Periodontal disease has already been linked with heart disease, type 2 diabetes and miscarriage, plus poor sperm quality in men.  An Australian study involving over 3,700 women indicated that those with gum disease had raised blood levels of markers for inflammation.[4]   Although speculative, as a precaution researchers suggest that the treatment of gum disorders might influence the outcome of infertility treatment.  According to Dr. Michael P. Rethman, president of the AAP, “[i]t is reasonable to assume that if low levels of plaque are established and maintained during the infertility treatment, gingival inflammation would not affect the success of infertility treatment,”  “[which] would require meticulous oral hygiene and routine professional cleanings, perhaps at the beginning of each menstrual cycle to ensure the presence of healthy gums.”

Professor Roger Hart advises women trying to get pregnant to get a check-up by their dentist along with other measures like stopping smoking and drinking, maintaining a healthy weight and taking folic acid supplements.  UK fertility expert Dr. Allan Pacey said, “It’s common sense advice really to make sure you are in a healthy condition [including good oral health] if you want to try for a baby.” Around 10% of the population is believed to have severe periodontal disease.[5]

So if you are trying to get pregnant and are unsure of your oral health please see your dentist.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com


[1] Journal of Periodontology, June 2004

[2]Ibid.

[3] Ananya Mandal, MD. Gum Disease Linked to Infertility. (2011)

[4] Professor Roger Hart, of the University of Western Australia.

[5] Gum disease linked to infertility http://www.news-medical.net/news/20110707/Gum-disease-linked-to-infertility.aspx. Screen clipping taken: 8/30/2011 5:09 PM  Posted in: Women’s Health News

Dentist Sandy Springs: Healthy smile, healthy you!

Oral health exam
Oral exams contribute to your global health.

Regular dental visits do more than just keep your smile attractive; they can tell a dentist a lot about your overall health, including whether or not you may be developing a disease like diabetes.  Recent research suggests that the health of your mouth is a reflection of the condition of your body as a whole. Meaning, if your mouth is healthy, chances are your overall health is also good.  It’s kind of like hand in glove.  So if you have poor oral health, this may be a sign that you may have other health issues.

There is further indication that a healthy smile may actually prevent certain diseases from occurring, such as gum precipitated heart infections.  As of late, a lot of orthopedic surgeons are requiring a blessing from your dentist before they operate.  According to the American Academy of Periodontology, there is a relationship between gum (periodontal) disease and health complications such as a stroke and heart disease.[1]   Women with gum disease also show higher incidences of pre-term, low birth-weight babies.  Recent studies also have shown that there are microbiologic and immunological findings that strongly support the association.  The studies indicate that periodontal infection can lead to placental-fetal exposure and, when coupled with a fetal inflammatory response, can lead to preterm delivery.[2]

Research shows that more than 80 percent of all systemic diseases (involving many organs or the whole body) have oral manifestations, including swollen gums, mouth ulcers, dry mouth and/or excessive gum problems. Such systemic diseases include:

  • diabetes
  • leukemia
  • cancer
  • heart disease
  • kidney disease

Since most people have regular oral examinations, their dentist may be the first line of defense to diagnose a health problem in its early stages.

Failing to take care of your teeth and can actually lead to other health problems, including:

  • Oral and facial pain.  According to the Office of the Surgeon General, this pain may be largely due to infections of the gums that support the teeth and can lead to tooth loss. Gingivitis, an early stage of gum disease, and advanced gum disease affect more than 75 percent of the U.S. population.
  • Problems with the heart and other major organs.  Mouth infections can affect major organs. For example, the heart and heart valves can become inflamed by bacterial endocarditis, a condition that affects people with heart disease or anyone with damaged heart tissue.
  • Oral cancer. Poor oral care can contribute to oral cancer, which now takes more lives annually than cervical or skin cancer.
  • Digestion problems.  Digestion begins with physical and chemical processes in the mouth, and problems here can lead to intestinal failure, irritable bowel syndrome and other digestion disorders.

Seeing a dentist regularly helps to keep your mouth healthy and allows your dentist opportunities to examine developments that may point to other health issues.  A dental exam also can detect poor nutrition and hygiene and growth and development problems. As always, if you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact our office for a consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

 


[1]  “Gum Disease Links to Heart Disease and Stroke.” American Academy of Periodontology, May 8, 2008. www.perio.org/consumer/mbc.heart.htm

[2] JADA, 2006, Exploring the relationship between periodontal disease and pregnancy complications

Yiorgos A. Bobetsis, DDS, PhD, Silvana P. Barros, DDS, PhD and Steven Offenbacher, DDS, PhD, MMSc

Dentist Sandy Springs: We need more BIG LOSERS!!

Overweight woman buttoning up her jeans. Image shot 2010. Exact date unknown.Think twice before taking that next bite.  Because we know that being overweight can affect many aspects of a person’s health.  Now researchers suspect a link exists between obesity and gum disease.  Whether one condition is a risk factor for another or whether one disease directly causes another has yet to be discovered.[1]

What we do know is half of the U.S. population age 30 and older is affected by gum disease — a chronic inflammatory infection that impacts the surrounding and supporting structures of the teeth.[2] Gum disease itself produces its own set of cytokines, which further increases the level of these inflammatory proteins in the body’s bloodstream, helping to set off a chain reaction of other inflammatory diseases throughout the body.[3]  So it is important to visit a dentist at least twice a year so he or she can evaluate your risks for developing gum disease and offer preventive strategies.

Impacting approximately one-third of the U.S. population, obesity has become a significant health concern for Americans.  As a part of your strategy to stay healthy, a dentist can design a personalized program of home oral care to meet your specific needs.  In the meantime, research on the relationship between obesity and gum disease is still ongoing.

I we can be of assistance, give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com


[1] January/February 2013 issue of General Dentistry, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), it also may be a risk factor for gum disease.

[3] Ibid.

Dentist Sandy Springs:Oral Health Guidelines for Pregnant Women

Pregnant2Why is oral health care important during pregnancy? Because mothers with gum disease have a higher instance of preterm birth, a potentially serious pregnancy complication that may cause health concerns for the infant, typically due to low birth weight.

Pregnancy gingivitis is a common form of gum disease known to develop in almost half of all pregnant women likely due to the change in hormones during the pregnancy.   With proper precautions, pregnancy gingivitis generally ends shortly after the birth of the child.  However, it should be monitored by a dentist periodically during pregnancy in order to prevent this form of gingivitis from progressing into more serious periodontitis, an advanced and irreversible form of gum disease that has been linked with preterm birth.

Pregnant mothers with periodontal diseaseare seven times more likely to go into preterm labor. Prostaglandin, a chemical found in oral bacteria, may induce labor.[1]  Also, high levels of prostaglandin have been found in the mouths of women with severe cases of periodontal disease.

The following guidelines were developed by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD)[2] in response to the growing concern surrounding oral health during pregnancy:

  • Oral Health Education – Counseling and early intervention by healthcare providers such as physicians, nurses, and dentists to provide expectant mothers with the tools and resources necessary to understand the importance of oral health care during pregnancy.
  • Oral Hygiene – Removing the bacterial plaque, which researchers have connected to preterm birth and low birth-weight babies, is essential. Using the correct brushing and flossing methods greatly increase the amount of plaque that is removed from the teeth and gums.
  • Fluoride – The American Dental Association recommends the use of toothpaste with fluoride by persons over the age of six.  Echoing their sentiment, the AAPD oral health guidelines advise the continued use of fluoridated toothpaste during pregnancy, and recommends the use of an over-the-counter alcohol-free fluoride rinse to help reduce the amount of plaque in the mouth.
  • Nutrition – Educating expectant mothers about proper diet and nutrition during pregnancy will limit unnecessary sugar intake and in turn, prevent plaque buildup.
  • Treating Existing Tooth Decay – Expectant mothers are encouraged to have existing tooth decay treated during their pregnancy, which experts believe is a completely safe practice during pregnancy. Restoring decayed teeth will help achieve oral health by removing the bacteria associated with tooth decay.
  • Transmission of Bacteria – Expectant mothers are discouraged from sharing food and utensils in order to prevent the transmission of the bacteria known to cause tooth decay.
  • Use of Xylitol Gum – Expectant mothers are encouraged to chew xylitol gum (four times a day) as research suggests that chewing this gum may decrease the rate of tooth decay in children.

And ALWAYS Talk to Your Dentist!

Women who are thinking about becoming pregnant may want to consider their oral health before becoming pregnant.[3]  If we can be of assistance or answer any of your questions please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles


[1] Synthetic prostaglandins are used to induce childbirth or abortion.  www.En.wikipedia.org/wiki/prostaglandin

[3] Unfortunately,  research suggests, treating existing gum disease in pregnant women does not reduce the instance of preterm birth.  Despite this fact, experts insist that regular oral health care should continue throughout pregnancy.

Dentist East Cobb: Diet & Exercise May Prevent Gum Disease

Women runningCan working out improve your dental health? Yes, according to one study. Researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine have discovered that people of a normal weight who exercise regularly and maintain a healthy diet are less likely to have gum disease. The study, published in the Journal of Periodontology, suggests that a healthy lifestyle may help prevent periodontal disease.

Researchers took the same factors that lower the risk of diabetes and heart disease into account when analyzing data from 12,110 participants. They found that those who exercised regularly, had healthy eating habits and maintained their weight were 40 percent less likely to develop periodontal disease than their counterparts. Those who met two of the criteria lowered their risk by 29 percent, while participants with just one healthy virtue had a 16 percent less chance of developing gum disease.

Overall, only 7 percent of those who met all three of the criteria had some form of gum disease. The participants who had a poor diet, limited physical activity and were considered overweight totaled 18 percent, suggesting that obesity can more than double your chances of developing periodontal disease.

Scientists aren’t exactly sure why these factors may decrease your chances of developing gum disease. It’s already known that healthy eating can help build up your immune system. Scientists now theorize that eating healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables, may also help remove dental plaque from teeth. It’s also believed that obesity promotes gum inflammation, while physical activity may decrease it.

While a healthy lifestyle may help improve your dental health, it’s not a substitute for maintaining a good oral hygiene routine. Brushing and flossing daily and seeing your dentist twice a year are essential.  Since June of 2015 we offer in-house implant and endodontic services through Drs. ZoAnna Scheinfeld and Hanna Orland.  If we can be of service or answer any of your questions please feel free to give us a call or email.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Dentist Roswell: Gum disease linked to infertility

Sandy Springs Dentist near meAccording to research presented at the American Academy of Periodontology conference in 2004, gum disease is linked to women who use infertility treatments.[1] The study said women undergoing infertility treatment for more than three menstrual cycles experience increased inflammation and bleeding of the gums. These women also have increased levels of gingival crevicular fluid, which contains tissue breakdown products that may be markers for the progression of gum disease.[2]

The lead author Dr. Cenk M. Haytac, from Cukurova University in Adana, Turkey, postulates that these effects occur because these agents increase body levels of estrogen and the gums apparently are a target for estrogen since they contain estrogen receptors.  Though not definitive, several studies have shown evidence that gum infections are associated with unsuccessful embryo development or the failure of in-vitro fertilization. Poor oral health is as bad for fertility as obesity – delaying conception by about two months says latest research.[3]

Experts at the annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Sweden were presented with evidence how women with gum disease took over seven months to conceive, compared to the usual five months. The researchers believe the underlying cause is inflammation. Unchecked, this can set off a chain of reactions capable of damaging the body’s normal workings.

Periodontal disease has already been linked with heart disease, type 2 diabetes and miscarriage, plus poor sperm quality in men.  An Australian study involving over 3,700 women indicated that those with gum disease had raised blood levels of markers for inflammation.[4]   Although speculative, as a precaution researchers suggest that the treatment of gum disorders might influence the outcome of infertility treatment.  According to Dr. Michael P. Rethman, president of the AAP, “[i]t is reasonable to assume that if low levels of plaque are established and maintained during the infertility treatment, gingival inflammation would not affect the success of infertility treatment,”  “[which] would require meticulous oral hygiene and routine professional cleanings, perhaps at the beginning of each menstrual cycle to ensure the presence of healthy gums.”

Professor Roger Hart advises women trying to get pregnant to get a check-up by their dentist along with other measures like stopping smoking and drinking, maintaining a healthy weight and taking folic acid supplements.  UK fertility expert Dr. Allan Pacey said, “It’s common sense advice really to make sure you are in a healthy condition [including good oral health] if you want to try for a baby.” Around 10% of the population is believed to have severe periodontal disease.[5]

So if you are trying to get pregnant and are unsure of your oral health please see your dentist.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles


[1]Journal of Periodontology, June 2004

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ananya Mandal, MD. Gum Disease Linked to Infertility. (2011)

[4] Professor Roger Hart, of the University of Western Australia.

[5] Gum disease linked to infertility http://www.news-medical.net/news/20110707/Gum-disease-linked-to-infertility.aspx. Screen clipping taken: 8/30/2011 5:09 PM  Posted in: Women’s Health News