Dentist Dunwoody: Teeth Grinding (Bruxism)

Dentist near me
Image via Wikipedia

Bruxism, otherwise known as teeth grinding, is when you clench (tightly hold your top and bottom teeth together) or grind (slide your teeth back and forth over each other) your teeth, that may or may not cause harm.  When teeth clenching or grinding occurs on a regular basis the teeth may become damaged and other possible oral health issues may develop.

People clench and grind their teeth without being aware of it during both the day and night.  When it is sleep-related, bruxism is often the bigger problem because of the lack of control.  Because it does occur during sleep most people are unaware of the problem until symptoms begin to arise.  While some of these symptoms are headaches or a sore jaw, they are masked by other factors such as too much stress, inability to relax, misalignment of the teeth, or even ones posture or diet.[1]

The cause of bruxism is not completely agreed upon, but daily stress may be the precipitant in many cases.  The clenching the teeth may be brought on by anxiety, stress or depression.  Other symptoms may include ear aches, insomnia and/or sensitivity in the teeth.[2]  The clenching or grinding puts pressure on the muscles, tissues, and other structures around your jaw. The symptoms may develop into temporomandibular joint problems, commonly referred to as TMJ.

If you think you may be grinding your teeth, talk to our dentists.  An examination can rule out other disorders that may cause similar jaw pain or ear pain, including:

  • Dental disorders
  • Ear disorders such as ear infections
  • Problems with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ)

Our dentists can examine your mouth and jaw for signs of bruxism, such as jaw tenderness and abnormalities in your teeth.  If it is diagnosed as night grinding, you can be fitted with a night guard (a splint) to prevent further damage to your teeth and other issues mentioned above.  The varying types of splints may prevent clenching and create a scenario where your mouth remains relaxed during sleep or during the day.  There are many approaches to retard the clenching behavior, many of which are more successful to daytime clench and grinders verses night clenchers.

Given that grinding and clenching may not fall within any one medical discipline, it may take a combination of approaches to permanently solve the problem.  However, dentists would appear to have the leg up on the other disciplines, given the amount of training and experience dentists have with your oral health.  Regardless, call our offices in either Sandy Springs or Chamblee to seek solutions to this potentially damaging oral health problem.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1] ADA and the National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002386/, Feb. 22, 2010.

[2]    Ibid.

Brookhaven Dentist: Do Children Grind Their Teeth?

Brookhaven Dentist near me, teeth grinding
Teeth wearing down due to grinding.

The problem teeth grinding is not limited to adults.  Approximately 15% to 33% of children grind their teeth. Children who grind their teeth tend to do so at two peak times in their lives – (1) when their baby teeth emerge and (2) when their permanent teeth come in.[1]  Some of this potential grinding is protected or goes unnoticed because of thumb sucking, which can cause a different set of problems.

While it is more common for children grinding their teeth to do it during sleep rather than during waking hours, it has not been determined exactly why children grind their teeth.  There are several theories which include improperly aligned teeth or irregular contact between upper and lower teeth, illnesses and other medical conditions (such as nutritional deficiencies, pinworm, allergies, endocrine disorders), and psychological factors including anxiety and stress, and all of which appear to be unsubstantiated theory.

The main reason there has been very little study on children grinding their baby teeth is that it rarely results in problems.  However, teeth grinding can cause jaw pain, headaches, wear on the teeth, and TMD.[2]  Consult your dentist if your child’s teeth look worn or if your child complains of tooth sensitivity or pain.

Should teeth grinding result in a real problem for your child, here are some specific tips to help stop teeth grinding:[3]

  1. Where possible, decrease your child’s stress, especially just before bedtime.
  2. Try massage and stretching exercises to relax the muscles.
  3. Make sure your child’s diet includes plenty of water. There is some thought that dehydration may be linked to teeth grinding.
  4. Ask your dentist to monitor your child’s teeth if he or she is a grinder.  Possibly consult a pedodontist (children’s dentist) and pediatrician if it becomes apparent that damage is occurring.

No intervention is usually required with preschool-age children. However, older children may need temporary crowns or other methods, such as a night guard, to prevent the grinding in their sleep.

Hanna Orland, DMD

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1] WebMD, Teeth Grinding (Bruxism) July 5, 2011

[3] WebMD, Teeth Grinding (Bruxism) July 5, 2011

 

Brookhaven Dentist near me: Teeth Grinding (Bruxism)

Bruxism Brookhaven Dentist near me

Bruxism, otherwise known as teeth grinding, is when you clench (tightly hold your top and bottom teeth together) or grind (slide your teeth back and forth over each other) your teeth, that may or may not cause harm.  When teeth clenching or grinding occurs on a regular basis the teeth may become damaged and possible other possible oral health issues may develop.

People may clench and grind their teeth without being aware of it during both the day and night.  When it is sleep-related, bruxism is often the bigger problem because of the lack of control.  Because it does occur during sleep most people are unaware of the problem until symptoms begin to arise.  While some of these symptoms are headaches or a sore jaw, they are masked by other factors such as too much stress, inability to relax, misalignment of the teeth, or even ones posture or diet.[1]

The cause of bruxism is not completely agreed upon, but daily stress may be the precipitant in many cases.  The clenching the teeth may be brought on by anxiety, stress or depression.  Other symptoms may include ear aches, insomnia and/or sensitivity in the teeth.[2]  The clenching or grinding puts pressure on the muscles, tissues, and other structures around your jaw. The symptoms may develop into temporomandibular joint problems, commonly referred to as TMJ.

If you suspect you may be grinding your teeth, talk to your dentist.  An examination can rule out other disorders that may cause similar jaw pain or ear pain, including:

  • Dental disorders
  • Ear disorders such as ear infections
  • Problems with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ)

Your dentist can examine your mouth and jaw for signs of bruxism, such as jaw tenderness and abnormalities in your teeth.  If it is diagnosed as night grinding, you can be fitted with a mouth or night guard (a splint) to prevent further damage to your teeth and other issues mentioned above.  The varying types of splints may prevent clenching and create a scenario where your mouth remains relaxed during sleep or during the day.  There are many approaches to retard the clenching behavior, many of which are more successful to daytime clench and grinders verses night clenchers.

Given that grinding and clenching may not fall within any one medical discipline, it may take a combination of approaches to permanently solve the problem.  However, dentist would appear to have the leg up on the other disciplines, give the amount of training and experience dentists have with your oral health.  Regardless, call the health care provider you are comfortable with to seek solutions to this potentially damaging oral health problem.

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

and

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1] ADA and the National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002386/, Feb. 22, 2010.

[2]    Ibid.

Chamblee Dentist: Teeth Grinding (Bruxism)

Chamblee Dentist near me
Bite guard can prevent grinding

Bruxism, otherwise known as teeth grinding, is when you clench or grind your teeth, that may cause harm.  When teeth clenching or grinding occurs on a regular basis the teeth become damaged and possibly other oral health issues may develop.

People may clench and grind their teeth without being aware of it during both the day and night.  When it is sleep-related, bruxism is often the bigger problem because of the lack of control.  While some of these symptoms are headaches or a sore jaw, they are masked by other factors such as too much stress, inability to relax, misalignment of the teeth, or even ones diet.[1]

The cause of bruxism is not completely agreed upon, but daily stress may be the precipitant in many cases.  The clenching the teeth may be brought on by anxiety, stress or depression.  Other symptoms may include ear aches, insomnia and/or sensitivity in the teeth.[2]  The clenching or grinding puts pressure on the muscles, tissues, and other structures around your jaw. The symptoms may develop into temporomandibular joint problems, commonly referred to as TMJ disorder.

If you suspect you may be grinding your teeth, call us.  An examination can rule out other disorders that may cause similar jaw pain or ear pain, including:

  • Dental disorders
  • Ear disorders such as ear infections
  • Problems with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ)

Our dentist can examine your mouth and jaw for signs of bruxism, such as jaw tenderness and abnormalities in your teeth.  If it is diagnosed as night grinding, you can be fitted with a mouth or night guard (a splint) to prevent further damage to your teeth and other issues mentioned above.  The varying types of splints may prevent clenching and create a scenario where your mouth remains relaxed during sleep or during the day.  There are many approaches to retard the clenching behavior, many of which are more successful to daytime clench and grinders verses night clenchers.

Given that grinding and clenching may not fall within any one medical discipline, it may take a combination of approaches to permanently solve the problem.  However,  a dentist would appear to have the leg up on the other disciplines, give the amount of training and experience dentists have with your oral health.  Regardless, call the health care provider you are comfortable with to seek solutions to this potentially damaging oral health problem.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

and

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com


[1] ADA and the National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002386/, Feb. 22, 2010.

[2]    Ibid.

Dentist Roswell: Teeth Grinding (Bruxism)

Deutsch: Eine Aufbissschiene für den Oberkiefe...
Image via Wikipedia

Bruxism, otherwise known as teeth grinding, is when you clench (tightly hold your top and bottom teeth together) or grind (slide your teeth back and forth over each other) your teeth, that may or may not cause harm.  When teeth clenching or grinding occurs on a regular basis the teeth may become damaged and possible other possible oral health issues may develop.

People may clench and grind their teeth without being aware of it during both the day and night.  When it is sleep-related, bruxism is often the bigger problem because of the lack of control.  Because it does occur during sleep most people are unaware of the problem until symptoms begin to arise.  While some of these symptoms are headaches or a sore jaw, they are masked by other factors such as too much stress, inability to relax, misalignment of the teeth, or even ones posture or diet.[1]

The cause of bruxism is not completely agreed upon, but daily stress may be the precipitant in many cases.  The clenching the teeth may be brought on by anxiety, stress or depression.  Other symptoms may include ear aches, insomnia and/or sensitivity in the teeth.[2]  The clenching or grinding puts pressure on the muscles, tissues, and other structures around your jaw. The symptoms may develop into temporomandibular joint problems, commonly referred to as TMJ.

If you suspect you may be grinding your teeth, talk to your dentist.  An examination can rule out other disorders that may cause similar jaw pain or ear pain, including:

  • Dental disorders
  • Ear disorders such as ear infections
  • Problems with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ)

Your dentist can examine your mouth and jaw for signs of bruxism, such as jaw tenderness and abnormalities in your teeth.  If it is diagnosed as night grinding, you can be fitted with a mouth or night guard (a splint) to prevent further damage to your teeth and other issues mentioned above.  The varying types of splints may prevent clenching and create a scenario where your mouth remains relaxed during sleep or during the day.  There are many approaches to retard the clenching behavior, many of which are more successful to daytime clench and grinders verses night clenchers.

Given that grinding and clenching may not fall within any one medical discipline, it may take a combination of approaches to permanently solve the problem.  However, dentist would appear to have the leg up on the other disciplines, give the amount of training and experience dentists have with your oral health.  Regardless, call the health care provider you are comfortable with to seek solutions to this potentially damaging oral health problem.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A                                               

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620                                          

receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles


[1] ADA and the National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002386/, Feb. 22, 2010.

[2]    Ibid.

Dentist Buckhead: Do Children Grind Their Teeth?

Buckhead Dentist near me

The problem of bruxism, otherwise known as teeth grinding, is not limited to adults.  According WebMD, approximately 15% to 33% of children grind their teeth. Children who grind their teeth tend to do so at two peak times in their lives – (1) when their baby teeth emerge and (2) when their permanent teeth come in.[1]  Some of this potential grinding is protected or goes unnoticed because of thumb sucking, which can cause a different set of problems.   However, most children who do not suck their thumbs while sleeping lose the teeth grinding habit shortly after these two sets of teeth have come in more fully.

While it is more common for children grinding their teeth to do it during sleep rather than during waking hours, it has not been determined exactly why children grind their teeth.  There are several theories which include improperly aligned teeth or irregular contact between upper and lower teeth, illnesses and other medical conditions (such as nutritional deficiencies, pinworm, allergies, endocrine disorders), and psychological factors including anxiety and stress, and all of which appear to be unsubstantiated theory.

The main reason there has been very little study on children grinding their baby teeth is that it rarely results in problems.  However, teeth grinding can cause jaw pain, headaches, wear on the teeth, and TMD.[2]  Consult your dentist if your child’s teeth look worn or if your child complains of tooth sensitivity or pain.

Should teeth grinding result in a real problem for your child, here are some specific tips to help stop teeth grinding:[3]

  1. Where possible, decrease your child’s stress, especially just before bedtime.
  2. Try massage and stretching exercises to relax the muscles.
  3. Make sure your child’s diet includes plenty of water. There is some thought that dehydration may be linked to teeth grinding.
  4. Ask your dentist to monitor your child’s teeth if he or she is a grinder.  Possibly consult a pedodontist (children’s dentist) and pediatrician if it becomes apparent that damage is occurring.

No intervention is usually required with preschool-age children. However, older children may need temporary crowns or other methods, such as a night guard, to prevent the grinding in their sleep.

Dr. Scheinfeld is an Emory trained prosthodontist specializing in mandibular form and function.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1] WebMD, Teeth Grinding (Bruxism) July 5, 2011

[3] WebMD, Teeth Grinding (Bruxism) July 5, 2011