Dentist Sandy Springs: Dental Care and Your Oral Hygiene

Sandy Springs dentist near meGood oral hygiene is preeminent in maintaining your overall health. Poor oral health has been linked to heart and lung disease, diabetes, stroke, extremely high-birth weight, and premature births. Often, diseases give their first warning signs in the form of oral problems.

There are four basic steps to maintain good oral health:

  1. Brush at least twice daily.
  2. Floss every day.
  3. Limit your consumption of junk food.
  4. Visit the dentist regularly.

When brushing and flossing, the proper technique is important.  Also, using the right products is equally important.[1] Without consistent care, several oral health problems can result.  Risks of gingivitis, cavities, tooth decay, and other gum diseases can lead to oral cancer or tooth loss.[2]

Here are some simple lifestyle changes that will improve oral health:

  1. Set an example for your children by practicing good oral health care habits.
  2. Check your children’s mouth for bleeding gums, swollen gums, gums receding away from teeth.
  3. Check for bad breath.
  4. Eat a balanced and nutritional diet.
  5. Educate your children about the health risks of tobacco use.[3]

Age-specific recommendations.

Infants:

  • For mothers to be, tetracycline is a no no.[4]
  • Teething usually starts at around 6 months and should be brushed and flossed daily.
  • Avoid baby bottle decay by not allowing your baby to fall asleep with a bottle full of juice or milk.[5]
  • If your water is not fluoridated, ask your doctor about daily fluoride supplements.[6]

Toddlers/Children:

  • Thumb sucking is a natural reflex for toddlers, but the habit may result in permanent bite issues.[7]
  • Make sure to use a pea-size amount of fluoride toothpaste when brushing your child’s teeth.
  • At age two (2) schedule regular dental appointments.

Teenagers:

  • Emphasize the importance of oral hygiene.
  • Again, set a good example by practicing good oral hygiene yourself.
  • Keep junk foods to a minimum for snacking.
  • Discourage oral piercings as they increase the risk for oral infections and can cause injury to their teeth.

Adults:

  • Brush twice daily, maybe more when possible.
  • Floss at least once a day
  • Watch for signs of gum disease such as redness, swelling or tenderness.[8]
  • Visit the dentist at least twice each year for regular check-ups.[9]
  • Limit sugary foods and soft drinks.

While practicing good oral hygiene is vital to your health, there is only so much that personal oral maintenance can do, so visiting your dentist for regular checkups is vital to your global health.[10]

The following is a list of reasons why you should visit your dentist frequently:

1) To prevent gum disease[11]

2) To prevent oral cancer[12]

3) To avoid losing your teeth[13]

4) To prevent dental emergencies[14]

5) To help maintain good overall health[15]

If we can be of service or answer any of your concerns, please call our office for a complimentary consult.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Article Sources:

Colgate World of Care http://www.colgate.com/app/Colgate/US/OC/Information/OralHealthBasics/GoodOralHygiene/OralHygieneBasics/FamilyGuideOralHealth.cvsp

Learn4Good http://www.learn4good.com/health/dental_health.htm

Caucus Educational Corporation http://www.caucusnj.org/caucusnj/special_series/oralhealth/importance.asp

U.S. Surgeon General http://www.perio.org/consumer/children.news.htm

“Top 5 Reasons to Visit the Dentist” by Tammy Davenport http://dentistry.about.com/od/dentalhealth/tp/visit_dentist.htm

The Oral Cancer Foundation http://www.oralcancerfoundation.org/

The American Dental Association http://www.ada.org/

Colgate Family Guide to Oral Care http://www.colgate.com/app/Colgate/US/OC/Information/OralHealthBasics/GoodOralHygiene/OralHygieneBasics/FamilyGuideOralHealth.cvsp

About the ADA seal of acceptance. (2005, March 14). Retrieved February 7, 2009, from American Dental Association Web site: http://www.ada.org/ada/seal/index.asp

American Dental Association News Releases. (2008, February 4). A reminder to parents: Early dental visits essential to children’s health. American Dental Association. Retrieve February 6, 2009, from http://ada.org/public/media/releases/0802_release01.asp

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2006, December). Oral Health for Adults. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Division of Oral Health. Retrieved February 6, 2009 from http://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/publications/factsheets/adult.htm

Oral health in America: Summary of the surgeon general’s report. (2006, April 16). Retrieved February 7, 2009, from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/Oralhealth/publications/factsheets/sgr2000_05.htm

 


[1] When buying any dental products, look for the American Dental Association Seal of Acceptance. The ADA seal is an important symbol of the dental product’s safety and effectiveness (ADA Seal, 2005).

[2] This “silent epidemic” (U.S. Surgeon General) can be avoided by regular treatment at home and dental visits twice each year.

[3] Smoking is the number one preventable risk factor for gum diseases.

[4] A common antibiotic that causes tooth discoloration to your child and should not be used by nursing mothers or by expectant mothers in the last half of pregnancy.

[5] Try water or a pacifier and make sure to wipe teeth and gums with a gentle cloth or gums after feeding

[6] Fluoride is very important even before teeth start forming.

[7] Buck teeth or overbite.

[8] Contact your dentist if you experience any of these symptoms.

[9] Generally, plaque begins forming to maturity about every 3 months.

[10] “Routine dental exams uncover problems that can be easily treated in the early stages, when damage is minimal” (American Dental Association [ADA], 2008).

[11] Gum disease, specifically gingivitis, is a leading cause of tooth decay and tooth loss. If gum disease is discovered and diagnosed early, it can be treated. However, if left untreated, gum disease can become periodontitus, a more severe and irreversible stage. This may lead to serious damage of the gum tissue and jaw bone, causing your teeth to fall out. This late stage of gum disease can also increase your risk of developing a heart attack or stroke.

[12] According to the Oral Cancer Foundation, a United States citizen will die from this type of cancer every hour of every day. Of similar concern is the fact that out of the 34,000 newly diagnosed Americans every year, only half of these people will be alive in the next five years. However, while attending your regular dental checkup, your dentist and oral hygienist screen you for this specific cancer. If diagnosed early, there is a good chance that oral cancer can be treated successfully.

[13] Without your teeth, normal eating habits can obviously be far more difficult. Also, taking care of your natural teeth now will help you avoid paying for dentures later. As stated previously, gum disease can easily lead to adult tooth loss, but regular visits to your dentist and good oral hygiene can prevent it.

[14] Toothaches, a broken jaw, chipped teeth, and other dental emergencies can be easily avoided with regular dental visits. Early signs or symptoms of these unpleasant conditions can be detected and treated by your dentist. If left untreated, you may have to endure root canals or forced tooth removals- these treatments are significantly more expensive than preventative care such as regular check-ups (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2006).

[15] Since gum disease is a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and certain forms of cancer, regular visits to your dentist can help prevent and treat this disease. By treating conditions early and learning from your dentist how to prevent oral damage, you can achieve better health and ultimately better quality years of life.

Number 1 Difference between Dental and Health care costs.

Affordable dentist near me

affordable dentistry near me

Free Market

Haven’t you noticed your dental care really hasn’t increased that much?  In fact it has either tracked or lagged behind the consumer price index and this is despite all the advances in dental technology.  Compare that observation to your medical care costs.  If you go in to see your dentist and ask for an estimated cost of treatment, 9 times out of 10 you will get a quote.  Try doing that in your physician’s office.   Why?  Because your dental care has been a product of the free market system.  The insurance companies have never yet to invade the purview of your oral health the way they have dominated, if not destroyed your overall health care.

You get your teeth examined, cancer screening, teeth cleaning and x-rays twice a year for less than $300.00.  And that’s about two hours of actual treatment from your dentist and his team.  At the physician’s office you go in once a year, see your physician or his PA for about 10 to 16[i] minutes on average and it costs $300 to $900.00, depending on possible immunizations and your blood work (which costs more than twice what an independent lab charges if you have it done outside of your physician’s office).   Physicians are paid by insurance and Medicare submittals based on the procedures they perform and not by the amount of time they spend with you.  So the quicker the visit the more procedures they can bill your insurance for.  If they take too long it cost them money, not you.  And all their revenues are based on negotiated fees with your insurance company, not the free market system.  Ah, the key phrase – free market system.  Dentistry never bought into insurance coverage for your treatment and care and as a result of the free market system there has been a reasonable or to put it better a withstandable increase to the cost of your oral health care based on the supply and demand curves.

So how much does insurance influence the cost of your health care?  Anecdotally, let me tell you about my daughter’s, but really my experience with health care and why we are the losers in this battle to secure adequate health care treatment at an affordable price.  My daughter had a cyst under her eyelid.  It was not visible to you or me, but it irritated the dickens to her cornea.   I found a specialist and accompanied my daughter to the physician.  It was determined that the treatment required general anesthesia to safely perform the surgery.  When I asked ‘how much’, I received no answer.  I was passed on to the patient coordinator for that physician.  So I asked ‘how much’, and again I received no answer.   They didn’t have a clue what this was going to cost me.  So I immediately said ‘sign me up, I’ll take two’.   Seriously though, they needed my insurance carrier and they would let me know, great.

I get a call from the physician’s office.  It’s going to cost you $800 and change.  Ok, great, and is that my drive out price?  ‘Oh no, that’s just the doctor’s fee.’  Ok, so what else?  I have to call the surgical center.  Ok, how much does that cost?  We [the doctor] don’t know, you just have to call and find out.  So I called.  The gentleman quoted me $1540.00 including 2 hours of facility and the anesthesiologist.  ‘Oh, and you won’t be needing a biopsy, since this is cosmetic.’  No wait, this is not cosmetic, it’s required surgery.  So the gentleman backs up and re-quotes the price.  It will be $4 to 7 thousand for the surgical suite, $1800 & change for the anesthesiologist and X amount of dollars for the biopsy.

Wait, hold on, back up a minute, you just quoted me a price that is almost 7 times what the same procedure would cost if it was elective surgery.  Ah, that key phrase creeps back in to the conversation.  Under a free market system, elective surgery only garners what the market will bear.  But under an insurance based system, physicians don’t know what it costs, so they inflate the costs and hope for some remuneration equal to or in excess of what it really costs under a free market system to treat you.  In other words, it’s a crap-shoot your physician is playing with your health insurance company.   And the loser is you.  So the next time you go to the physician or the dentist, remember why you’re paying what to whom, the physician or your insurance company.  And the next time you discuss health care reform; you’re probably talking about insurance reform.  If we can answer your questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com


[i] About.com, Trisha Torrey, November 14, 2008.

Brush and Floss if you want to keep ‘em – Dentist Sandy Springs

mature women smiling3
brush and floss to achieve the right smile for your life style

Often I am asked questions such as ‘how often I should floss’ or ‘is flossing really necessary‘?  I am famous for saying “You should only brush and floss the teeth you want to keep! Brushing and flossing your teeth are the two most important activities you can do to ensure good oral health.

The goal of brushing and flossing is to reduce or rid your mouth of harmful bacteria that can adversely affect both your gums and teeth. Microscopic bacteria reside in your mouth calling it home, feeding off the food particles left on our teeth.

Bacteria produce acid from their feasting and  this acid eats into your tooth enamel creating cavities. Addition toxins are produced from bacteria in plaque that will inflame and irritate your gum tissue. And finally, without proper care the bacteria can also sulfur compounds that create bad breath.

In the most recent studies, poor oral health can be linked to other related health issues that may stem from oral bacteria entering the bloodstream affecting other internal organs.  Regular brushing and flossing removes the plaque and the bacteria plaque contains. Unfortunately, many people think brushing alone is sufficient to rid the mouth of these bacteria.   But flossing is a key component to your good oral hygiene program.

If you do not floss and allow plaque to remain in between teeth it eventually hardens into a substance known as tartar. Unlike plaque which can be easily removed by brushing, tartar can only be removed by your dentist.

Over time, failing to floss will result in irritated and inflamed gums. This condition is known as gingivitis, which if left untreated can progress to periodontal disease domino’ing into gingival recession, bone loss, loose teeth, and so on until ultimately your teeth are lost.

Timely and regular flossing removes the bacteria that escapes the reach of the toothbrush.  Brushing alone only does part of the job.  So you really need to floss. The American Dental Association recommends that you floss at least once a day, but I would suggest once in the morning and once in the evening as the better protocol.

If we can be of service or answer any of questions please contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Sandy Springs | Adults Need Convincing

Dental Examination
Dental Examination

Educating patients about the importance of regular dental treatment is an important obligation of our dental practice.  But often it’s a very difficult task because many patients have been socialized that their oral health is secondary to their global health.  Unfortunately, research has proven just the opposite.

According to the Health Policy Institute of the American Dental Association, the percentage of children who have had a dental visit in the past year has risen between 2000 and 2013. While adults (age 19-64), the percentage has seen a sharp decline.

A little more than 35% of adults feel the need to visit the dentist annually. This is bad for overall oral health of the people in the US.

One survey found that Millennials (which make up much of the adult population today) are most likely to seek out dental treatment using “daily deals” sites based on cost.  Another point is the fact that people who live in households that make less than $35,000 are more likely to rely on an emergency room visit for treating their teeth than consumers from higher-income households. While it makes sense logically, it’s not a good trend for any of the parties involved.

We offer affordable care and invite you to come in and see practice and its services.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Top 4 Reasons Not to Play Hooky – Dentist Sandy Springs

Sandy Springs dentist near meSure, regular cleanings promote good oral hygiene, but did you know these visits also screen for a multitude of diseases? Getting your teeth cleaned and having your doctor’s exam may not rank up there with an afternoon of golf or a matinee movie, but it may be well worth it for your overall health. And the pandemic? Don’t let Covid-19 cause you to develop other health issues.

4 really great reasons for your regularly scheduled cleanings:

  1. It’s an opportunity to check for Oral Cancer.

You may or may not realize that you’re screened for oral cancer during your regular dental cleaning but you are.

  1. Your gums are being checked for Gum Disease.

Gum disease is one of the leading causes of adult tooth loss. It can be treated and reversed if diagnosed early.

  1. Your overall health.

Studies have linked heart attacks, diabetes detection and strokes to gum disease associated with poor oral hygiene.  So a trip to see us at least every 6 months could reduce your risk of other serious health issues.

  1. Early detection of Dental Problems.

Without regular check-ups, undetected problems can lead to more serious issues like root canals, gum surgery and tooth extraction.   An ounce of prevention verses a pound of cure.

Check-ups allow us to examine your mouth and keep you on the right path.  If it’s been more than 6 months since your last check up and cleaning, call us to schedule an appointment today.  If we can be of any help or answer any questions please feel free to drop us a line.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

Howard Abrahams, DDS

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Oral healthcare and the cancer patient

Sandy Springs Dentist – A higher standard through healthcare well planned

Oral CancerManagement of a patient being treated for cancer, particularly where the cancer treatment is located near the head and neck should involve your oral healthcare provider, i.e. your dentist.  Unfortunately, there are very few published studies or guidelines on how to manage the cancer patient during therapy.  Accordingly, there is considerable variation across the medical community relative to specific non-medicated approaches to baseline oral care.

Oral-facial complications are common after radiotherapy to the head and neck, and after chemo-therapy for malignant diseases. Oral Mucositis, also called stomatitis is the most frequent and debilitating complication of cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy, occurring in about 40% of patients. Oral mucositis is inflammation of the mucosa of the mouth which ranges from redness to severe ulceration. Symptoms of mucositis vary from pain and discomfort to an inability to tolerate food or fluids.[1]

All patients at risk should receive a standardized oral care regime as an ongoing component of their cancer therapy.  Additional interventions may include dental brushing with toothpaste, dental flossing, ice chips, and sodium bicarbonate rinses. These regimens typically include dental work to eliminate caries and existing gum disease before beginning cancer treatment, followed by thorough and frequent cleaning of the oral cavity with a variety of products, some form of pain relief, anti-inflammatory treatment as required and aggressive antimicrobial treatment for any new mouth infections.[2] Patient compliance with these agents can be maximized by comprehensive overseeing by the oral healthcare professional.

Get the facts, ask the Right Smile Center.  If we can be of assistance, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC.

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

[1] http://oralcancerfoundation.org/dental/pdf/mucositis.pdf

[2] Ibid.

Dentist Alpharetta: Teeth Cleanings, more than meets the eye.

mature women smiling3Going to the dentist is so much more than just having your teeth cleaned.  When you go for your semi-annual or quarterly cleaning, you also are examined for any signs of oral cancer, potential tooth decay and x-rays to see whether or not you’re having any otherwise undetectable issues going on with your teeth and jaws.

For example, cancer treatments, pregnancy, heart diseases, diabetes, dental appliances (dentures, braces) can all impact your oral health and may necessitate a change in the care of your mouth and/or teeth. Be sure to tell your dentist if you have experienced a change in your general health or in any medications you are taking since your last dental visit.  People with special conditions – such as pregnancy, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and other underlying diseases, orthodontic appliances – may require additional instruction and perhaps treatments to keep their mouth healthy. Make sure you understand the additional care and/or treatment that is needed, commit to the extra tasks, and work them into your daily health routine.

This is the best opportunity to talk to your oral healthcare provider.  Don’t be afraid to ask your dentist for more information if you don’t understand a diagnosis, treatment or procedure. You should be able to have a free and frank discussion with your dentist about the following types of issues:

  1. What are the treatment options for a particular dental condition?
  2. How do these options differ in cost and in their durability?
  3. Do all the options solve the problem?
  4. What are the benefits and drawbacks of each option?
  5. Of the dental treatments being recommended, which are absolutely necessary, which are less urgent, which are elective, and which are merely cosmetic?
  6. What are the consequences of delaying treatment?

As you can see, a hygiene appoint is more than just having your teeth cleaned. A beautiful smile is more than just great white teeth. It begins with a strong foundation of good oral healthcare[1]. If you have any additional questions or concerns please contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

How much do teeth cleanings usually cost? https://therightsmile.wordpress.com/2012/02/27/dentist-sandy-springs-how-much-do-teeth-cleanings-cost/

Check out our patient reviews at: http://www.rateadentist.com/reviews/georgia/sandysprings/novyscheinfeldddspc

Special Needs Patients https://therightsmile.wordpress.com/2013/02/15/sandy-springs-dentist-special-needs-patients/


[1] While we don’t push products, the Right Smile Center offers a comprehensive portfolio of professional home care products that can help you maintain healthy teeth and gums and keep your smile bright, like MI Paste.

Dentist: East Cobb : Oral Health Care of Our Aging Population

Dentist near meTwo important oral health care concerns emerging in the United States are disparities in the oral disease burden and the inability of certain segments of the population to access oral healthcare.[1]  Older Americans are becoming a larger segment of our population and suffer disproportionately from oral diseases, with the problem being particularly acute for individuals in long term care facilities.  Population projections for the United States indicate that the elderly will constitute an increasing percentage of the population as we proceed into the 21st century.

In 2001, the population of the United States was almost 278 million, and 12.6% of the population was 65 years of age or older. By 2015, the population is expected to increase to 312 million (3.08 million in 2010) and 14.7% of the population will be aged 65 years or older.  In 2030, which is within the practice lives of students currently enrolled in dental schools, the population will have increased to more than 350 million, and 20% of the population—1 of every 5 members of the US society—will be 65 years of age or older.  This large segment of our population is further compounded by the elderly population continuing to become increasingly diverse in terms of race, ethnicity,financial resources, and living conditions.[2]

The challenges faced by both the dental profession and the nation as a whole regarding provision of oral health care services to older adults were the subject of a recent report prepared by Oral Health America.[3]  All 50 states were surveyed to determine the level of Medicaid coverage for dental services, and the report concludes that financing oral health care services for the elderly will be a major challenge to our future.  Medicare does not provide any coverage for dental services, and only 1 of 5 Americans aged 75 years or older has any type of private dental insurance.  Given our current economic circumstances it will be highly unlikely that our government resources will be adequate to gear up for the impending problem of oral health for the elderly.

The elderly suffer from chronic disorders that can directly or indirectly affect oral health, including autoimmune disorders such as pemphigus and pemphigoid.[4] They generally require multiple medications, and common side effects of the more than 500 medications used to treat their overall health issues usually reduce salivary flow.[5]   Usually the reduction in saliva can adversely affect their quality of life, the ability to chew, and lead to significant problems of the teeth and their supporting structures.

The elderly may also have difficulty performing routine oral hygiene procedures because of physical limitations, such as Parkinson’s or rheumatoid arthritis.   In addition,oral infection is now recognized as a risk factor for a number of systemic diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular diseases,diabetes, mellitus, and respiratory disorders.  Also,it is important to note that once people have lost their teeth and are using complete dentures, their oral health needs do not decrease.   Our jaws are not static and may continue to resorb over time.  Besides the continued resorption of bone, improperly fitted dentures can adversely affect chewing, leading to poor nutrition.  In addition, those without teeth remain susceptible to oral cancer, mucosal diseases, and alterations in salivary gland function.

So for the vast majority of seniors who will reside in a long term care facility, financing of oral health care services will be a formidable challenge.Given that medicare does not provide coverage for routine dental services including exams,and in the absence of private insurance or personal resources,a large portion of this group will not be able to afford any dental services whatsoever, let alone the most appropriate treatments.  Clearly, there must be a response to the increasing oral health concerns of the elderly who present with special needs, especially those who are home bound or living in long term  facilities burdened with other chronic disorders.

While effective preventive measures exist for younger populations(water fluoridation, dental sealants and parents), no preventive measures have been devised to address the expected increase in oral health needs of the aging population.  And the need for a coordinated effort to address the oral healthcare needs of the elderly suggested by demographic trends and epidemiological data necessitates our planning for what might be considered a crisis or at least a paradigm shift in oral health care delivery for the elderly.  Such a plan must consider contributions from the dental profession, possibly through the efforts of the American Dental Association (ADA) and its state and local associations; the dental schools, with involvement of the American Dental Education Association; federal, state, and local health authorities; and assistance from national organizations and foundations that focus on health care.  The dental profession has an opportunity to take a leadership role in the delivery of health care services to the seniors who have contributed so vitally to our society’s well-being and who deserve to be treated with the best oral health care we have to offer.

Dr. Scheinfeld is a prosthodontist specializing in geriatric care.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related Articles


[1] Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, Md: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; 2000.

[2] Wikipedia and 2010 Census.                                                                                

[3] A State of Decay: The Oral Health of Older Americans. Chicago, Ill: Oral Health America; 2003:1–8.

[4] Stoopler ET, Sollecito TP, De Ross SS. Desquamative gingivitis: early presenting system of mucocutaneous disease. Quintessence Int.2003;34:582–586.

[5] Fox PC, Eversole LR. Diseases of the salivary glands. In: Silverman S, Eversole LR, Truelove EL, eds. Essentials of Oral Medicine. Ontario, Canada: BC Decker; 2002:260–276.

Connecting Obamacare dots.

Connecting Obamacare dots.

Health InsuranceClick on the title (link) above to read this insightful article by Dr. Hal Scherz, who is a pediatric urologist at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. Putting the dots together can be a very scary premise, but a realistic one.  Insurance companies are already raising premiums with increasing benefits and hospitals are acquiring medical practices.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com