Warning signs of Periodontal Disease : Sandy Springs Dentist

Hygiene exam Periodontal diseaseThe following are warning signs of periodontal disease:

  • Bad breath or bad taste that won’t go away
  • Red or swollen gums
  • Tender or bleeding gums
  • Painful chewing
  • Loose teeth
  • Sensitive teeth
  • Gums that have pulled away from your teeth
  • Any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • Any change in the fit of partial dentures

When you begin to notice these signs call and see your dentist.  Whether your gum disease is stopped, slowed, or gets worse depends a great deal on how well you care for your teeth and gums every day, from this point forward.

When considering any extensive dental or medical treatment options, you should think about getting second opinion.  If we can be of assistance, please call for a free consultation.

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

Sandy Springs Dentist: What are periodontal diseases?

mature-female-health smilePeriodontal diseases are bacterial gum infections that destroy the gums and supporting bone that hold your teeth in your mouth. The disease which can be caused by multiple factors can affect one tooth or many teeth.

The main cause is bacterial plaque, a sticky, whitish film that constantly forms on your teeth. If it is not removed, it can turn into a hard substance called calculus or tartar in less than 48 hours. Tartar is so hard it can only be removed by an oral health professional, such as a dentist or dental hygienist. The bacteria in plaque infect the gums, and release poisons that cause redness and inflammation around your teeth.  The inflammation and poisons cause the destruction of the tissues that support your teeth. Once this happens, the gums separate from the teeth, forming pockets that fill with even more plaque causing even deeper and more infection.

The disease is multi-factorial.  Meaning, there is not just one cause of periodontal diseases but rather multiple factors that can affect the oral health of your gums.

● SYSTEMIC DISEASES that interfere with the body’s immune system may adversely affect the condition of the gums and supporting bone.

● POOR NUTRITION can make it difficult for the body’s immune system to fight off infection.

● GENETICS and family history of periodontal diseases suggest a propensity for developing these diseases.

● TOBACCO use significantly increases the risk of developing periodontal diseases and can thwart treatment.

● HORMONAL CHANGES in women during pregnancy, puberty and menopause can cause the gums to become inflamed and bleed easily.

● POOR ORAL HYGIENE technique, oral piercing, drug or alcohol abuse can affect periodontal health.

● STRESS can make it more difficult for the body to fight off infection, including periodontal diseases.

● Some MEDICATIONS such as oral contraceptives, antidepressants and certain heart medicine can affect oral health.

The entire team is dedicated to providing you with the personalized, gentle care that you deserve. If you are in need of a complimentary consult to determine your oral health situation please feel free to contact us.

Hanna Orland, DMD
290 Carpenter Drive, 200A
Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328
404-256-3620
info@rightsmilecenter.com
http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Buckhead: Women and Oral Health

mature womanAs a woman, you know that your health needs are unique, including your oral health needs. And because your needs are unique, you need to take extra care of yourself.  While women tend to take better care of their oral health than men do, women’s oral health is not significantly better than men’s.  This is because hormonal fluctuations throughout a woman’s life can affect many tissues, including gum tissue.  These fluctuations occur when you mature and change, as you do during puberty or menopause, or other times when you have special health needs, such as menstruation and particularly during pregnancy.

According to the Journal of Periodontology[1] at least 23 percent of women between the ages 30 to 54 have periodontitis.[2]  And, 44 percent of women ages 55 to 90 who still have their teeth have periodontitis.  Yet many women do not realize they have it until it reaches an advanced state, which is why regular hygiene check-ups are so important.

Stages of your life – steps to protect your oral health.

Puberty – an increased level of sex hormones, such as progesterone and possibly estrogen, causes increased blood circulation to the gums. This may cause an increase in the gum’s sensitivity and lead to a greater reaction to any irritation, including food particles and plaque. Signs to look for in your teenage daughter are swollen, red and/or tender gums.[3]

It is particularly important during this time in your daughter’s life to make sure she follows a good at-home oral hygiene regimen, including regular brushing and flossing, and regular dental care. In some cases, a dental professional may recommend periodontal therapy to help prevent damage to the tissues and bone surrounding the teeth.[4]

Menstruation – can result in menstruation gingivitis.  Women with this condition may experience bleeding gums, bright red and swollen gums and sores on the inside of the cheek. Menstruation gingivitis typically occurs right before a woman’s period and clears up once her period has started.  Sometimes it occurs concurrent with stressful situations and menstruation.

Pregnancy – increase gingivitis or pregnancy gingivitis beginning in the second or third month of pregnancy that increases in severity throughout the eighth month. During this time, some women may notice swelling, bleeding, redness or tenderness in the gum tissue.[5] As a result of varying hormone levels, between 50%-70% of women will develop gingivitis sometime during their pregnancy – a condition called pregnancy gingivitis.[6] In some cases, gums swollen by pregnancy gingivitis can react strongly to irritants and form large lumps. These growths, called pregnancy tumors, are not cancerous and generally painless.

Studies have shown a possible relationship between periodontal disease and pre-term, low-birth-weight babies. Any infection, including periodontal infection, is cause for concern during pregnancy. In fact, pregnant women who have periodontal disease may be more likely to have a baby that is born too early and too small!

To prevent pregnancy gingivitis it’s especially important to practice good oral hygiene habits, which include brushing at least twice a day, flossing once a day, and using an antimicrobial mouth rinse. If you are due for a professional cleaning, don’t skip it simply because you are pregnant.  Now more than ever, professional dental cleanings are particularly important.

Oral contraceptives – while women are taking drugs to help treat periodontal disease, such as antibiotics, may lessen the effect of an oral contraceptive.  So be sure and consult your dentist about all the medications you are taking.

Menopause and Post-Menopause – not surprising given all the changes happening within your body, but you may experience changes in your mouth as well.  You may notice discomfort such as dry mouth, pain and burning sensations in the gum tissue and altered taste, particularly to salt and pepper.

In addition, menopausal gingivostomatitis affects a small percentage of women. Gums that look dry or shiny or bleed easily and range from abnormally pale to deep red may indicate this condition. Most women find that estrogen supplements help to relieve these symptoms.[7]

Bone loss is potentially associated with both periodontal disease and osteoporosis. Women considering Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) to help fight osteoporosis should note that this may help protect their teeth and your jawbone as well as other parts of the body.

What Should You Do?

See a dental professional for cleaning at least twice a year – you need to monitor your oral health.

If referred, see a periodontist in your area. Problems may include: Bleeding gums during brushing, red, swollen or tender gums.   Other issues such as persistent bad breath or pus between the teeth and gums.  If you’re a denture wearer a change in the fit of your dentures may occur.

Keep your dentist informed about any medications you are taking and any changes in your health history.

Brush and floss properly every day.  Review your techniques with a dental professional.

If there any questions that you might have, please call us to discuss them.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1] January 1999 issue of the Journal of Periodontology

[2] Periodontitis is an advanced state of periodontal disease in which there is active destruction of the periodontal supporting tissues.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] WebMd. Pregnancy Gingivitis and Pregnancy Tumors.

[7] Women and Gums: American Academy of Periodontology Journal. http://www.perio.org/consumer/women.htm.

Dentist Alpharetta: We need more BIGGEST LOSERS!!

Overweight woman buttoning up her jeans. Image shot 2010. Exact date unknown.Think twice before taking that next bite.  Because we know that being overweight can affect many aspects of a person’s health.  Now researchers suspect a link exists between obesity and gum disease.  Whether one condition is a risk factor for another or whether one disease directly causes another has yet to be discovered.[1]

What we do know is half of the U.S. population age 30 and older is affected by gum disease — a chronic inflammatory infection that impacts the surrounding and supporting structures of the teeth.[2] Gum disease itself produces its own set of cytokines, which further increases the level of these inflammatory proteins in the body’s bloodstream, helping to set off a chain reaction of other inflammatory diseases throughout the body.[3]  So it is important to visit a dentist at least twice a year so he or she can evaluate your risks for developing gum disease and offer preventive strategies.

Impacting approximately one-third of the U.S. population, obesity has become a significant health concern for Americans.  As a part of your strategy to stay healthy, a dentist can design a personalized program of home oral care to meet your specific needs.  In the meantime, research on the relationship between obesity and gum disease is still ongoing.

If we can be of assistance, give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1] January/February 2013 issue of General Dentistry, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), it also may be a risk factor for gum disease.

[3] Ibid.

Dentist Sandy Springs | Oral Bacteria and Global Health

Hygiene exam
Oral Examinations are important to your global health.

Two new studies, published in the Journal of Periodontology have explored the potential link between periodontal bacteria and pre-eclampsia, as well as coronary artery disease. As small as it is and as far from your hearth as possible, this oral bacteria may have a huge impact on coronary artery disease and pre-eclampsia.  More research is needed to fully understand how periodontal bacteria travels from the mouth to other parts of the body as well as the exact role it has in the development of these systemic diseases, but in the meantime it’s important to maintain your oral health until more is known.  Physicians, dentists and patients alike need to monitor the research in this area as it continues to grow so they can better work together to achieve the highest levels of overall health.

These studies found that periodontal bacteria, often invisible to the unaided eye, may account for big effects on general health conditions. This bacterium has often been thought to play a role in many of the potential connections between overall health and oral health.  According to the article, one study identified periodontal pathogens in the coronary and internal mammary arteries in nine out of 15 of the patients examined. The second study looked at women who had suffered from pre-eclampsia during pregnancy and found that 50 percent of the placentas from women with pre-eclampsia were positive for one or more periodontal pathogens. This was compared to just 4.3 percent in the control group. Both of these studies support the concept that periodontal organisms might be associated with the development of other systemic conditions such as coronary artery disease and pre-eclampsia.

That’s why in our Sandy Springs office we recommend seeing us at least twice a year and additionally if necessary regardless of what your insurance covers.  It’s in your best interest.  If you need to see us for consideration of your oral health, please contact us.

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dunwoody Dentist ǁ Teeth Cleaning

mature woman
Professional Cleanings maintain your health smile

Professional cleanings are the key to a healthy smile.  And a healthy smile starts with health gums.  If you or your family have not had a professional cleaning recently, please consider the importance of regular cleanings and maintenance of your dental and global health. Regular cleanings will keep you healthy and save your smile in the long run.  While skipping your cleanings costs money and your health.[1]

The ADA recommends the following for good oral hygiene:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day with an ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste.
  • Clean between teeth daily with floss or an interdental cleaner. Decay-causing bacteria lingers between teeth where brush bristles can’t reach.
  • Flossing removes plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line.  While some study results[2] indicate the use of a mouth rinse can be as effective as flossing for reducing plaque between the teeth, the ADA recommends brushing twice a day and cleaning between teeth with floss or interdental cleaners once each day to remove plaque from all tooth surfaces. Plaque is responsible for both tooth decay and gum disease.
  • Eat a balanced diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Visit us regularly for professional cleanings and oral exams.
  • Talk with us about what types of oral care products are most effective for you. The ADA Seal on a product is your assurance that it has met ADA criteria for safety and effectiveness. Look for the ADA Seal on fluoride toothpaste, toothbrushes, floss, interdental cleaners, oral irrigators, mouth rinses and other oral hygiene products.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three or four months (or sooner) if the bristles become frayed. A worn toothbrush will not do a good job of cleaning your teeth[3].

 It is possible to have periodontal disease and have no warning signs, which is one reason why regular dental checkups and periodontal examinations are very important. Treatment methods depend upon the type of disease and how far the condition has progressed. Good oral hygiene at home is essential to help keep periodontal disease from becoming more serious or recurring. You don’t have to lose teeth to periodontal disease.

Schedule dental visits for you and your family today by calling The Right Smile Center in Sandy Springs at 404-256-3620. Our dental office is conveniently located on Carpenter Drive in Sandy Springs, and we serve patients from Sandy Springs, Roswell, Dunwoody, Alpharetta, Johns Creek, Buckhead, Marietta, East Cobb and surrounding Atlanta communities. We welcome new patients and will be happy to answer all of your questions with a complimentary visit. Our team includes in-house periodontal specialists.  We look forward to making you, and your loved ones, smile!

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

 

Related articles

 

[1] http://therightsmilecenter.blogspot.com/2013/07/dentist-sandy-springs-skipping-your.html

 

[2] Sharma, et. al., Am. J. Dent. 15:351-355, 2002. Bauroth, et.al., J. Am. Dent. Assn. 134:359-365, Mar 2003

[3] Children’s toothbrushes often need replacing more frequently than adults because they can wear out sooner.

 

Dentist Sandy Springs: Scaling and Root Planing

Mature woman smiling
Beautiful smile needs a little help from a professional.

If you are lacks in taking care of your oral health you’re going to end up with one of two results, periodontal disease or lost teeth.  The former won’t go away by itself.  The later just falls out.  Your line of defense is prevention – good routine home care and seeing your dentist at least twice a year.  Regular dental checkups and cleanings are essential to preventing periodontal diseases.  And when you don’t engage in good oral health practices the likelihood of disease increases.

In some cases, even with these practices, a certain percentage of patients experience some form of periodontal disease that must be treated.  Depending on the extent of the disease, your dentist may recommend the more aggressive treatment of scaling and root planing.  Scaling is used to remove plaque and tartar beneath the gumline and the root surfaces are planed to allow the gum tissue to heal and reattach to the tooth.

Preventing and treating the disease in the early stages are the best approach to keeping your smile healthy.   We’re a multi-specialty practice that can help you and your family maintain the proper oral health.  We specialize in the right smile.  So call now and get your oral health in order.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com