Warning signs of Periodontal Disease : Dunwoody Dentists

Chamblee Sandy Springs Dentist near meThe following are warning signs of periodontal disease:

  • Bad breath or bad taste that won’t go away
  • Red or swollen gums
  • Tender or bleeding gums
  • Painful chewing
  • Loose teeth
  • Sensitive teeth
  • Gums that have pulled away from your teeth
  • Any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • Any change in the fit of partial dentures

When you begin to notice these signs call and see your dentist.  Whether your gum disease is stopped, slowed, or gets worse depends a great deal on how well you care for your teeth and gums every day, from this point forward.

If we can be of assistance, please call for a free consultation.

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Scheinfeld Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

Tooth Root Exposed? Not good… Dentist Sandy Springs

Sandy Springs Dentist root exposureAre you the patient coming in with severe gum recession where the root is exposed in front of your tooth?  You don’t have symptoms, yet, it just looks strange and you want to know if there is a problem.  We’re a multi-specialty practice with in-house periodontal treatment.  And in a healthy mouth, the tooth roots are not exposed.  If they are exposed, it’s usually a sign of one of these problems:

  • Gingivitis or Periodontitis.  Gum disease can cause the gum tissue to pull away from the tooth, and expose the root.
  • Brushing too hard.  Aggressive tooth brushing can cause the gums to recede.  We recommend soft tooth brushes to prevent this from happening.  Soft tooth brushes used properly minimize the trauma to the tissue and bone.
  • And on rare occasions tooth developed outside of the jaw bone.  In this case, we highly recommend seeing a periodontist to determine the best form of treatment.

So if you have an exposed tooth root, you need to see us at one of our two officesOur dental team will determine the quality and quantity of the gum tissue that remains.  If the gum recession is caught early, the tissue can be treated until healthy, replaced and your tooth may have an excellent prognosis.

We offer complimentary consultations.  Please allow us to help you if your gums are receding.  Call now for your free consult.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Atlanta’s most respected Prosthodontist — therightsmile.wordpress.com

 

Dentist Sandy Springs: Top 4 Reasons Not to play hooky from Your Dental Cleanings

Sandy Springs Dentist near meYour regular cleanings in our office promotes good oral hygiene, but did you know these visits also screen for a multitude of diseases?

Getting your teeth cleaned and having your doctor’s exam may not rank up there with an afternoon on the course or ditching work to enjoy a matinee, but it may be well worth it for your overall health. Here are 4 really great reasons to see your dentist for your regularly scheduled cleanings.

  1. It’s an opportunity to check for Oral Cancer. You may or may not realize that you’re screened for oral cancer during your regular dental cleaning but you are. According to the Oral Cancer Foundation, an American dies of oral cancer every hour of every day. It’s a sad proposition, especially when you consider that it is highly curable with early diagnosis.
  2. Your gums are being checked for Gum Disease. Gum disease, or an infection in the gum tissues and bone that keep your teeth in place, is one of the leading causes of adult tooth loss. It can be treated and reversed if diagnosed early. Unfortunately, not receiving treatment will lead to a more serious and advanced state of gum disease. Regular cleanings and check-ups along with daily brushing and flossing are key defenses against gum disease.
  3. Your overall health. Studies have linked heart attacks, diabetes detection and strokes to gum disease associated with poor oral hygiene.  A trip to your dentist at least every 6 months and in some cases more often, could reduce your risk of other serious health issues.
  4. Early detection of Dental Problems. We’ve already touched upon early detection of gum disease and oral cancer, but don’t overlook more basic dental problems. Cavities and broken fillings are easy to treat. Without regular check-ups, undetected problems can lead to more serious issues like root canals, gum surgery and tooth extraction.   An ounce of prevention verses a pound of cure.

So you haven’t been keeping up with what current research has to say about caring for your teeth.  That’s why check-ups allow our dentists to examine your mouth and keep you on the right path.  If it’s been more than 6 months since your last check up and cleaning, call your dentist to schedule an appointment today.  If we can be of any help or answer any questions please feel free to drop us a line.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Dentist serving Dunwoody: 8 Windows your overall health sees through dentistry.

Sandy Springs Dentist near me

I read this article the other day by the Mayo Clinic staff and it appears very much worth republishing.  Please read this and adjust your life accordingly.  It’s really not that difficult to lead a healthy life style and live longer lives.

Oral health: A window to your overall health

Your oral health is more important than you may realize. Get the facts about how the health of your mouth, teeth and gums may affect your general health.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Did you know that your oral health can offer clues about your overall health? Or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Understand the intimate connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.

What’s the connection between oral health and overall health?

Your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless. Normally the body’s natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and
flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, harmful bacteria can sometimes grow out of control and cause oral infections, such as tooth decay
and gum disease. In addition, dental procedures, medications, or treatments that reduce saliva flow, disrupt the normal balance of bacteria in your mouth
or breach the mouth’s normal protective barriers may make it easier for bacteria to enter your bloodstream.

What conditions may be linked to oral health?

Your oral health may affect, be affected by or contribute to various diseases and conditions, including:

  • Endocarditis. Gum disease and dental procedures that cut your gums may allow bacteria to enter your bloodstream. If you have a weak immune system or a damaged heart valve, this can cause infection in other parts of the body — such as an infection of the inner lining of the heart (endocarditis).
  • Cardiovascular disease. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke may be linked to oral bacteria, possibly due to chronic inflammation from periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Gum disease has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes reduces the body’s resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk. In addition, people who have inadequate blood sugar control may develop more-frequent and severe infections of the gums and the bone that holds teeth in place, and they may lose more teeth than do people who have good blood sugar control.
  •  HIV/AIDS. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.
  • Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — may be associated with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.
  • Alzheimer’s disease. Tooth loss before age 35 may be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Other conditions. Other conditions that may be linked to oral health include Sjogren’s syndrome — an immune system disorder — and eating disorders.

Be sure to tell your dentist if you’re taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you’ve had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition.

How can I protect my oral health?

To protect your oral health, resolve to practice good oral hygiene every day. For example:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three to four months.
  • Floss daily.
  • Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Schedule regular dental checkups.

Also, watch for signs and symptoms of oral disease and contact your dentist as soon as a problem arises. Remember, taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health.

Pasted from <http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dental/DE00001/NSECTIONGROUP=2>

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs) GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Warning signs of Periodontal Disease : Sandy Springs Dentist

Sandy Springs Dentist near meThe following are warning signs you might have periodontal disease:

  • Bad breath or bad taste that won’t go away
  • Red or swollen gums
  • Tender or bleeding gums
  • Painful chewing
  • Loose teeth
  • Sensitive teeth
  • Gums that have pulled away from your teeth
  • Any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • Any change in the fit of partial dentures

When you begin to notice these signs call and see your dentist.  Whether your gum disease is stopped, slowed, or gets worse depends a great deal on how well you care for your teeth and gums every day, from this point forward.

When considering any extensive dental treatment options, you should think about our team for a second opinion.  If we can be of assistance, please call for a free consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Brookhaven: Gum disease linked to infertility

Brookhaven dentist near meAccording to research presented at the American Academy of Periodontology conference in 2004, gum disease is linked to women who use infertility treatments.[1] The study said women undergoing infertility treatment for more than three menstrual cycles experience increased inflammation and bleeding of the gums. These women also have increased levels of gingival crevicular fluid, which contains tissue breakdown products that may be markers for the progression of gum disease.[2]

The lead author Dr. Cenk M. Haytac, from Cukurova University in Adana, Turkey, postulates that these effects occur because these agents increase body levels of estrogen and the gums apparently are a target for estrogen since they contain estrogen receptors.  Though not definitive, several studies have shown evidence that gum infections are associated with unsuccessful embryo development or the failure of in-vitro fertilization. Poor oral health is as bad for fertility as obesity – delaying conception by about two months says latest research.[3]

Experts at the annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Sweden were presented with evidence how women with gum disease took over seven months to conceive, compared to the usual five months. The researchers believe the underlying cause is inflammation. Unchecked, this can set off a chain of reactions capable of damaging the body’s normal workings.

Periodontal disease has already been linked with heart disease, type 2 diabetes and miscarriage, plus poor sperm quality in men.  An Australian study involving over 3,700 women indicated that those with gum disease had raised blood levels of markers for inflammation.[4]   Although speculative, as a precaution researchers suggest that the treatment of gum disorders might influence the outcome of infertility treatment.  According to Dr. Michael P. Rethman, president of the AAP, “[i]t is reasonable to assume that if low levels of plaque are established and maintained during the infertility treatment, gingival inflammation would not affect the success of infertility treatment,”  “[which] would require meticulous oral hygiene and routine professional cleanings, perhaps at the beginning of each menstrual cycle to ensure the presence of healthy gums.”

Professor Roger Hart advises women trying to get pregnant to get a check-up by their dentist along with other measures like stopping smoking and drinking, maintaining a healthy weight and taking folic acid supplements.  UK fertility expert Dr. Allan Pacey said, “It’s common sense advice really to make sure you are in a healthy condition [including good oral health] if you want to try for a baby.” Around 10% of the population is believed to have severe periodontal disease.[5]

So if you are trying to get pregnant and are unsure of your oral health please see your dentist.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road,

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

and

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1]Journal of Periodontology, June 2004

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ananya Mandal, MD. Gum Disease Linked to Infertility. (2011)

[4] Professor Roger Hart, of the University of Western Australia.

[5] Gum disease linked to infertility http://www.news-medical.net/news/20110707/Gum-disease-linked-to-infertility.aspx. Screen clipping taken: 8/30/2011 5:09 PM  Posted in: Women’s Health News

8 Windows Dentistry Opens to your Overall Health

Sandy Springs Dentist near meI  read this article the other day by the Mayo Clinic staff and it appears very much worth republishing.  Please read this and adjust your life accordingly.  Its really not that difficult to lead a healthy life style and live longer lives through good oral health.

Oral health: A window to your overall health

Your oral health is more important than you may realize. Get the facts about how the health of your mouth, teeth and gums may affect your general health.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Did you know that your oral health can offer clues about your overall health? Or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Understand the intimate connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.

What’s the connection between oral health and overall health?

Your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless. Normally the body’s natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, harmful bacteria can sometimes grow out of control and cause oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease. In addition, dental procedures, medications, or treatments that reduce saliva flow, disrupt the normal balance of bacteria in your mouth or breach the mouth’s normal protective barriers may make it easier for bacteria to enter your bloodstream.

What conditions may be linked to oral health?

Your oral health may affect, be affected by or contribute to various diseases and conditions, including:

  • Endocarditis. Gum disease and dental procedures that cut your gums may allow bacteria to enter your bloodstream. If you have a weak immune system or a damaged heart valve, this can cause infection in other parts of the body — such as an infection of the inner lining of the heart (endocarditis).
  • Cardiovascular disease. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke may be linked to oral bacteria, possibly due to chronic inflammation from periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Gum disease has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes reduces the body’s resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk. In addition, people who have inadequate blood sugar control may develop more-frequent and severe infections of the gums and the bone that holds teeth in place, and they may lose more teeth than do people who have good blood sugar control.
  • HIV/AIDS. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.
  • Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — may be associated with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.
  • Alzheimer’s disease. Tooth loss before age 35 may be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Other conditions. Other conditions that may be linked to oral health include Sjogren’s syndrome — an immune system disorder — and eating disorders.

Be sure to tell your dentist if you’re taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you’ve had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition.

How can I protect my oral health?

To protect your oral health, resolve to practice good oral hygiene every day. For example:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three to four months.
  • Floss daily.
  • Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Schedule regular dental checkups.

Also, watch for signs and symptoms of oral disease and contact your dentist as soon as a problem arises. Remember, taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health. Pasted from <http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dental/DE00001/NSECTIONGROUP=2&gt;

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs) GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Chamblee Dentist: Regular Dental Check-ups

Oral ExamOne of the most common reasons people avoid the dentist is they think everything is OK. The logic is simple: no pain means no problems. Unfortunately, most dental conditions including cavities, gum disease and oral cancer give little or no warning, because they may remain painless for months or even many years.  By the time a person is in pain, the dental problem is usually so advanced that the treatment required may be much more involved and costly, and may necessitate more down time after completion.  In addition, those patients who choose not to have regular dental visits have statistically higher global health costs.

Every day, your dentist sees patients with untreated cavities that eventually cause infection to the nerves and blood supply within the tooth. A tooth that may have only needed a simple and inexpensive filling a few months ago may now require a root canal, surgical removal of the tooth and/or a crown, costing thousands instead of hundreds for dollars.

The same is true for patients with gum disease. Gum disease can progress quietly for many years before it becomes advanced and teeth become loose or cause pain. While early gum disease can usually be treated with a deep cleaning under the gum, advanced gum disease may require gum surgery and antibiotics.

Oral cancer is another issue your dentist looks for on every dental examination. Tragically, those who avoid dental care are often the victims of aggressive forms of oral cancer that are difficult to treat. Those who wait for an unusual growth in the mouth to become painful may be taking a gamble. Oral cancer has a 50%, five-year fatality rate.

The moral of the story is very simple: visit our office at least twice a year for dental cleanings and check-up examinations.  It’s fairly inexpensive and you will save time and money, as well as significantly improve your oral health by treating all dental problems as soon as they occur. In fact, some research suggests that those in good dental health will actually live longer than people who do not take care of their teeth. It is also important for people without teeth to see their dentist at least once a year. The dentist will need to check the fit of removable dentures and also look for any signs of oral cancer.

We are a multi-specialty practice that has the expertise to diagnose and treat you under one roof.  If we can be of service, please give us a call or contact us for a consult.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

 

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist: Chamblee: Healthy smile, healthy you!

mature women smiling3Regular dental visits do more than just keep your smile attractive; they can tell a dentist a lot about your overall health, including whether or not you may be developing a disease like diabetes.  Recent research suggests that the health of your mouth is a reflection of the condition of your body as a whole.  Meaning, if your mouth is healthy, chances are your overall health is also good.  It’s kind of like hand in glove.  So if you have poor oral health, this may be a sign that you may have other health issues.

There is further indication that a healthy smile may actually prevent certain diseases from occurring, such as gum precipitated heart infections.  As of late, a lot of orthopedic surgeons are requiring a blessing from your dentist before they operate.  According to the American Academy of Periodontology, there is a relationship between gum (periodontal) disease and health complications such as a stroke and heart disease.[1]   Women with gum disease also show higher incidences of pre-term, low birth-weight babies.  Recent studies also have shown that there are microbiologic and immunological findings that strongly support the association.  The studies indicate that periodontal infection can lead to placental-fetal exposure and, when coupled with a fetal inflammatory response, can lead to preterm delivery.[2]

Further research shows that more than 80 percent of all systemic diseases (involving many organs or the whole body) have oral manifestations, including swollen gums, mouth ulcers, dry mouth and/or excessive gum problems. Such systemic diseases include:

  • diabetes
  • leukemia
  • cancer
  • heart disease
  • kidney disease

Since most people have regular oral examinations, their dentist may be the first line of defense to diagnose a health problem in its early stages.

Failing to take care of your teeth and can actually lead to other health problems, including:

  • Oral and facial pain.  According to the Office of the Surgeon General, this pain may be largely due to infections of the gums that support the teeth and can lead to tooth loss. Gingivitis, an early stage of gum disease, and advanced gum disease affect more than 75 percent of the U.S. population.
  • Problems with the heart and other major organs.  Mouth infections can affect major organs. For example, the heart and heart valves can become inflamed by bacterial endocarditis, a condition that affects people with heart disease or anyone with damaged heart tissue.
  • Oral cancer. Poor oral care can contribute to oral cancer, which now takes more lives annually than cervical or skin cancer.
  • Digestion problems.  Digestion begins with physical and chemical processes in the mouth, and problems here can lead to intestinal failure, irritable bowel syndrome and other digestion disorders.

Seeing a dentist regularly helps to keep your mouth healthy and allows your dentist opportunities to examine developments that may point to other health issues.  A dental exam also can detect poor nutrition and hygiene and growth and development problems. As always, if you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact our office in Chamblee or Sandy Springs for a consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1]  “Gum Disease Links to Heart Disease and Stroke.” American Academy of Periodontology, May 8, 2008. www.perio.org/consumer/mbc.heart.htm

[2] JADA, 2006, Exploring the relationship between periodontal disease and pregnancy complications

Yiorgos A. Bobetsis, DDS, PhD, Silvana P. Barros, DDS, PhD and Steven Offenbacher, DDS, PhD, MMSc

Dentist Sandy Springs: Gum disease linked to infertility in women

According to research presented at the American Academy of Periodontology conference in 2004,

gum disease is linked to women who

Angela=ina Jolie Pregnant
Angelina Jolie with child

use infertility treatments.[1] The study said women undergoing infertility treatment for more than three menstrual cycles experience increased inflammation and bleeding of the gums. These women also have increased levels of gingival crevicular fluid, which contains tissue breakdown products that may be markers for the progression of gum disease.[2]

The lead author Dr. Cenk M. Haytac, from Cukurova University in Adana, Turkey, postulates that these effects occur because these agents increase body levels of estrogen and the gums apparently are a target for estrogen since they contain estrogen receptors.  Though not definitive, several studies have shown  evidence that gum infections are associated with unsuccessful embryo development or the failure of in-vitro fertilization. Poor oral health is as bad for
fertility as obesity – delaying conception by about two months says latest research.[3]

Experts at the annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Sweden were presented with evidence how women with gum disease took over seven months to conceive, compared to the usual five months. The researchers believe the underlying cause is inflammation. Unchecked, this can set off a chain of reactions capable of damaging the body’s normal workings.

Periodontal disease has already been linked with heart disease, type 2 diabetes and miscarriage, plus poor sperm quality in men.  An Australian study involving over 3,700 women indicated that those with gum disease had raised blood levels of markers for inflammation.[4]   Although speculative, as a precaution researchers suggest that the treatment of gum disorders might influence the outcome of infertility treatment.  According to Dr. Michael P. Rethman, president of the AAP, “[i]t is reasonable to assume that if low levels of plaque are established and maintained during the infertility treatment, gingival inflammation would not affect the success of infertility treatment,”  “[which] would require meticulous oral hygiene and routine professional cleanings, perhaps at the beginning of each menstrual cycle to ensure the presence of healthy gums.”

Professor Roger Hart advises women trying to get pregnant to get a check-up by their dentist along with other measures like stopping smoking and drinking, maintaining a healthy weight and taking folic acid supplements.  UK fertility expert Dr. Allan Pacey said, “It’s common sense advice really to make sure you are in a healthy condition [including good oral health] if you want to try for a baby.” Around 10% of the population is believed to have severe periodontal disease.[5]

So if you are trying to get pregnant and are unsure of your oral health please see your dentist.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com


[1] Journal of Periodontology, June 2004

[2]Ibid.

[3] Ananya Mandal, MD. Gum Disease Linked to Infertility. (2011)

[4] Professor Roger Hart, of the University of Western Australia.

[5] Gum disease linked to infertility http://www.news-medical.net/news/20110707/Gum-disease-linked-to-infertility.aspx. Screen clipping taken: 8/30/2011 5:09 PM  Posted in: Women’s Health News