Tooth Root Exposed? Not good… Dentist Sandy Springs

Sandy Springs Dentist root exposureAre you the patient coming in with severe gum recession where the root is exposed in front of your tooth?  You don’t have symptoms, yet, it just looks strange and you want to know if there is a problem.  We’re a multi-specialty practice with in-house periodontal treatment.  And in a healthy mouth, the tooth roots are not exposed.  If they are exposed, it’s usually a sign of one of these problems:

  • Gingivitis or Periodontitis.  Gum disease can cause the gum tissue to pull away from the tooth, and expose the root.
  • Brushing too hard.  Aggressive tooth brushing can cause the gums to recede.  We recommend soft tooth brushes to prevent this from happening.  Soft tooth brushes used properly minimize the trauma to the tissue and bone.
  • And on rare occasions tooth developed outside of the jaw bone.  In this case, we highly recommend seeing a periodontist to determine the best form of treatment.

So if you have an exposed tooth root, you need to see us at one of our two officesOur dental team will determine the quality and quantity of the gum tissue that remains.  If the gum recession is caught early, the tissue can be treated until healthy, replaced and your tooth may have an excellent prognosis.

We offer complimentary consultations.  Please allow us to help you if your gums are receding.  Call now for your free consult.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Atlanta’s most respected Prosthodontist — therightsmile.wordpress.com

 

Dentist Sandy Springs: Women and Your Oral Health

As a woman, you know that your health needs are unique and this includes your oral health needs. And because your needs are unique, you need to take extra care of yourself.  While women tend to take better care of their oral health than men do, it’s not significantly better than men’s.  This is because hormonal fluctuations throughout a woman’s life can affect many tissues, including gum tissue.  These fluctuations occur when you mature and change, as you do during puberty or menopause, or other times when you have special health needs, such as menstruation and particularly during pregnancy.Sandy Springs Dentist near me

According to the Journal of Periodontology[1] at least 23 percent of women between the ages 30 to 54 have periodontitis.[2]  And, 44 percent of women ages 55 to 90 who still have their teeth have periodontitis.  Yet many women do not realize they have it until it reaches an advanced state, which is why regular hygiene check-ups are so important.

Stages of your life – steps to protect your oral health.

Puberty – an increased level of sex hormones, such as progesterone and possibly estrogen, causes increased blood circulation to the gums. This may cause an increase in the gum’s sensitivity and lead to a greater reaction to any irritation, including food particles and plaque. Signs to look for in your teenage daughter are swollen, red and/or tender gums.[3]

It is particularly important during this time in your daughter’s life to make sure she follows a good at-home oral hygiene regimen, including regular brushing and flossing, and regular dental care. In some cases, a dental professional may recommend periodontal therapy to help prevent damage to the tissues and bone surrounding the teeth.[4]

Menstruation – can result in menstruation gingivitis.  Women with this condition may experience bleeding gums, bright red and swollen gums and sores on the inside of the cheek. Menstruation gingivitis typically occurs right before a woman’s period and clears up once her period has started.  Sometimes it occurs concurrent with stressful situations and menstruation.

Pregnancy – increase gingivitis or pregnancy gingivitis beginning in the second or third month of pregnancy that increases in severity throughout the eighth month. During this time, some women may notice swelling, bleeding, redness or tenderness in the gum tissue.[5] As a result of varying hormone levels, between 50%-70% of women will develop gingivitis sometime during their pregnancy – a condition called pregnancy gingivitis.[6] In some cases, gums swollen by pregnancy gingivitis can react strongly to irritants and form large lumps. These growths, called pregnancy tumors, are not cancerous and generally painless.

Studies have shown a possible relationship between periodontal disease and pre-term, low-birth-weight babies. Any infection, including periodontal infection, is cause for concern during pregnancy. In fact, pregnant women who have periodontal disease may be more likely to have a baby that is born too early and too small!

To prevent pregnancy gingivitis it’s especially important to practice good oral hygiene habits, which include brushing at least twice a day, flossing once a day, and using an antimicrobial mouth rinse. If you are due for a professional cleaning, don’t skip it simply because you are pregnant.  Now more than ever, professional dental cleanings are particularly important.

Oral contraceptives – while women are taking drugs to help treat periodontal disease, such as antibiotics, may lessen the effect of an oral contraceptive.  So be sure and consult your dentist about all the medications you are taking.

Menopause and Post-Menopause – not surprising given all the changes happening within your body, but you may experience changes in your mouth as well.  You may notice discomfort such as dry mouth, pain and burning sensations in the gum tissue and altered taste, particularly to salt and pepper.

In addition, menopausal gingivostomatitis affects a small percentage of women. Gums that look dry or shiny or bleed easily and range from abnormally pale to deep red may indicate this condition. Most women find that estrogen supplements help to relieve these symptoms.[7]

Bone loss is potentially associated with both periodontal disease and osteoporosis. Women considering Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) to help fight osteoporosis should note that this may help protect their teeth and your jawbone as well as other parts of the body.

What Should You Do?

See a dental professional for cleaning at least twice a year – you need to monitor your oral health.

If referred, see a periodontist in your area. Problems may include: Bleeding gums during brushing, red, swollen or tender gums.   Other issues such as persistent bad breath or pus between the teeth and gums.  If you’re a denture wearer a change in the fit of your dentures may occur.

Keep your dentist informed about any medications you are taking and any changes in your health history.

Brush and floss properly every day.  Review your techniques with a dental professional.

If there any questions that you might have, please call us to discuss them.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1] January 1999 issue of the Journal of Periodontology

[2] Periodontitis is an advanced state of periodontal disease in which there is active destruction of the periodontal supporting tissues.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] WebMd. Pregnancy Gingivitis and Pregnancy Tumors.

[7] Women and Gums: American Academy of Periodontology Journal. http://www.perio.org/consumer/women.htm.

Dentist Sandy Springs: Healthy smile, healthy you!

Oral health exam
Oral exams contribute to your global health.

Regular dental visits do more than just keep your smile attractive; they can tell a dentist a lot about your overall health, including whether or not you may be developing a disease like diabetes.  Recent research suggests that the health of your mouth is a reflection of the condition of your body as a whole. Meaning, if your mouth is healthy, chances are your overall health is also good.  It’s kind of like hand in glove.  So if you have poor oral health, this may be a sign that you may have other health issues.

There is further indication that a healthy smile may actually prevent certain diseases from occurring, such as gum precipitated heart infections.  As of late, a lot of orthopedic surgeons are requiring a blessing from your dentist before they operate.  According to the American Academy of Periodontology, there is a relationship between gum (periodontal) disease and health complications such as a stroke and heart disease.[1]   Women with gum disease also show higher incidences of pre-term, low birth-weight babies.  Recent studies also have shown that there are microbiologic and immunological findings that strongly support the association.  The studies indicate that periodontal infection can lead to placental-fetal exposure and, when coupled with a fetal inflammatory response, can lead to preterm delivery.[2]

Research shows that more than 80 percent of all systemic diseases (involving many organs or the whole body) have oral manifestations, including swollen gums, mouth ulcers, dry mouth and/or excessive gum problems. Such systemic diseases include:

  • diabetes
  • leukemia
  • cancer
  • heart disease
  • kidney disease

Since most people have regular oral examinations, their dentist may be the first line of defense to diagnose a health problem in its early stages.

Failing to take care of your teeth and can actually lead to other health problems, including:

  • Oral and facial pain.  According to the Office of the Surgeon General, this pain may be largely due to infections of the gums that support the teeth and can lead to tooth loss. Gingivitis, an early stage of gum disease, and advanced gum disease affect more than 75 percent of the U.S. population.
  • Problems with the heart and other major organs.  Mouth infections can affect major organs. For example, the heart and heart valves can become inflamed by bacterial endocarditis, a condition that affects people with heart disease or anyone with damaged heart tissue.
  • Oral cancer. Poor oral care can contribute to oral cancer, which now takes more lives annually than cervical or skin cancer.
  • Digestion problems.  Digestion begins with physical and chemical processes in the mouth, and problems here can lead to intestinal failure, irritable bowel syndrome and other digestion disorders.

Seeing a dentist regularly helps to keep your mouth healthy and allows your dentist opportunities to examine developments that may point to other health issues.  A dental exam also can detect poor nutrition and hygiene and growth and development problems. As always, if you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact our office for a consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

 


[1]  “Gum Disease Links to Heart Disease and Stroke.” American Academy of Periodontology, May 8, 2008. www.perio.org/consumer/mbc.heart.htm

[2] JADA, 2006, Exploring the relationship between periodontal disease and pregnancy complications

Yiorgos A. Bobetsis, DDS, PhD, Silvana P. Barros, DDS, PhD and Steven Offenbacher, DDS, PhD, MMSc

Roswell Dentist: New Directions in Oral Health Care

Roswell Dentist near meThe hygienist plays an intricate role in your oral health care.  At a minimum the role includes periodontal disease evaluation, taking x-rays and a patient’s periodontal charting.  Traditionally, they engaged in cleaning and flossing the teeth under the theory that at healthy mouth was primarily necessary for the patient to keep their teeth.

While this is still the case,  discoveries in the last decade have uncovered the correlation between periodontal disease and other health related issues such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, cardiovascular disease, pregnancy related problems that assigns new priorities to the role of the hygienist and your dental visits.  These correlations have caused a new focus on evaluating a dental patient and new signals related to your overall health.

“The American Academy of Periodontology seeks to educate the public about research findings which support what dental professionals have long suspected: Infections in the mouth can play havoc elsewhere in the body. For a long time it was thought that bacteria was the factor that linked periodontal disease to other infections in the body; however, more recent research demonstrates that inflammation may link periodontal disease to other chronic conditions. Research has shown, and experts agree, that there is an association between periodontal diseases and other chronic inflammatory conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, treating inflammation may not only help manage periodontal diseases but may also help with the management of other chronic inflammatory conditions.” [1]

The U.S. Surgeon General agrees that oral health is a strong indicator of one’s overall health and well-being.[2]  Often, diseases give their first warning signs in the form of a patient’s oral problems.  Without consistent care and monitoring, several oral health problems can result.  Immediate risks include gingivitis, cavities, tooth decay, and other gum diseases which can eventually result in various types oral cancer.  There is a “silent epidemic”[3] that can be avoided by regular treatment at home and dental visits at least twice each year.  While practicing good oral hygiene at home is vital to your health, there is only so much that personal oral maintenance can do.  A normal person can easily overlook conditions that could greatly complicate or even end one’s life.  Thus, visiting our dentists for regular checkups is vital to a healthier smile.

“Routine dental exams uncover problems that can be easily treated in the early stages, when damage is minimal”.[4]   Now that it is known that gum disease can be a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and certain forms of cancer, regular visits to your dentist can help prevent and treat this disease.  By treating conditions early and learning from our dentists how to prevent oral diseases, you can achieve better health and ultimately better quality years of life.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Serving residents in East Cobb, Roswell, Alpharetta, Johns Creek, Dunwoody, Buckhead and surrounding communities.

Related Articles

 


[2](CDC, 2006).

[3](U.S. Surgeon General).

[4](American Dental Association [ADA], 2008).

Dentist Roswell: Women and Your Oral Health

As a woman, you know that your health needs are unique and this includes your oral health needs. And because your needs are unique, you need to take extra care of yourself.  While women tend to take better care of their oral health than men do, women’s oral health is not significantly better than men’s.  This is because hormonal fluctuations throughout a woman’s life can affect many tissues, including gum tissue.  These fluctuations occur when you mature and change, as you do during puberty or menopause, or other times when you have special health needs, such as menstruation and particularly during pregnancy.

According to the Journal of Periodontology[1] at least 23 percent of women between the ages 30 to 54 have periodontitis.[2]  And, 44 percent of women ages 55 to 90 who still have their teeth have periodontitis.  Yet many women do not realize they have it until it reaches an advanced state, which is why regular hygiene check-ups are so important.

Stages of your life – steps to protect your oral health.

Puberty – an increased level of sex hormones, such as progesterone and possibly estrogen, causes increased blood circulation to the gums. This may cause an increase in the gum’s sensitivity and lead to a greater reaction to any irritation, including food particles and plaque. Signs to look for in your teenage daughter are swollen, red and/or tender gums.[3]

It is particularly important during this time in your daughter’s life to make sure she follows a good at-home oral hygiene regimen, including regular brushing and flossing, and regular dental care. In some cases, a dental professional may recommend periodontal therapy to help prevent damage to the tissues and bone surrounding the teeth.[4]

Menstruation – can result in menstruation gingivitis.  Women with this condition may experience bleeding gums, bright red and swollen gums and sores on the inside of the cheek. Menstruation gingivitis typically occurs right before a woman’s period and clears up once her period has started.  Sometimes it occurs concurrent with stressful situations and menstruation.

Pregnancy – increase gingivitis or pregnancy gingivitis beginning in the second or third month of pregnancy that increases in severity throughout the eighth month. During this time, some women may notice swelling, bleeding, redness or tenderness in the gum tissue.[5] As a result of varying hormone levels, between 50%-70% of women will develop gingivitis sometime during their pregnancy – a condition called pregnancy gingivitis.[6] In some cases, gums swollen by pregnancy gingivitis can react strongly to irritants and form large lumps. These growths, called pregnancy tumors, are not cancerous and generally painless.

Studies have shown a possible relationship between periodontal disease and pre-term, low-birth-weight babies. Any infection, including periodontal infection, is cause for concern during pregnancy. In fact, pregnant women who have periodontal disease may be more likely to have a baby that is born too early and too small!

To prevent pregnancy gingivitis it’s especially important to practice good oral hygiene habits, which include brushing at least twice a day, flossing once a day, and using an antimicrobial mouth rinse. If you are due for a professional cleaning, don’t skip it simply because you are pregnant.  Now more than ever, professional dental cleanings are particularly important.

Oral contraceptives – while women are taking drugs to help treat periodontal disease, such as antibiotics, may lessen the effect of an oral contraceptive.  So be sure and consult your dentist about all the medications you are taking.

Menopause and Post-Menopause – not surprising given all the changes happening within your body, but you may experience changes in your mouth as well.  You may notice discomfort such as dry mouth, pain and burning sensations in the gum tissue and altered taste, particularly to salt and pepper.

In addition, menopausal gingivostomatitis affects a small percentage of women. Gums that look dry or shiny or bleed easily and range from abnormally pale to deep red may indicate this condition. Most women find that estrogen supplements help to relieve these symptoms.[7]

Bone loss is potentially associated with both periodontal disease and osteoporosis. Women considering Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) to help fight osteoporosis should note that this may help protect their teeth and your jawbone as well as other parts of the body.

What Should You Do?

See a dental professional for cleaning at least twice a year – you need to monitor your oral health.

If referred, see a periodontist in your area. Problems may include: Bleeding gums during brushing, red, swollen or tender gums.   Other issues such as persistent bad breath or pus between the teeth and gums.  If you’re a denture wearer a change in the fit of your dentures may occur.

Keep your dentist informed about any medications you are taking and any changes in your health history.

Brush and floss properly every day.  Review your techniques with a dental professional.

If there any questions that you might have, please contact or call us at our Sandy Springs office to discuss them.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles


[1] January 1999 issue of the Journal of Periodontology

[2] Periodontitis is an advanced state of periodontal disease in which there is active destruction of the periodontal supporting tissues.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] WebMd. Pregnancy Gingivitis and Pregnancy Tumors.

[7] Women and Gums: American Academy of Periodontology Journal. http://www.perio.org/consumer/women.htm.

Dentist: Roswell: Healthy smile, healthy you!

Regular dental visits do more than just keep your smile attractive; they can tell a dentist a lot about your overall health, including whether or not you may be developing a disease like diabetes.  Recent research suggests that the health of your mouth is a reflection of the condition of your body as a whole.  Meaning, if your mouth is healthy, chances are your overall health is also good.  It’s kind of like hand in glove.  So if you have poor oral health, this may be a sign that you may have other health issues.

There is further indication that a healthy smile may actually prevent certain diseases from occurring, such as gum precipitated heart infections.  As of late, a lot of orthopedic surgeons are requiring a blessing from your dentist before they operate.  According to the American Academy of Periodontology, there is a relationship between gum (periodontal) disease and health complications such as a stroke and heart disease.[1]   Women with gum disease also show higher incidences of pre-term, low birth-weight babies.  Recent studies also have shown that there are microbiologic and immunological findings that strongly support the association.  The studies indicate that periodontal infection can lead to placental-fetal exposure and, when coupled with a fetal inflammatory response, can lead to preterm delivery.[2]

Further research shows that more than 80 percent of all systemic diseases (involving many organs or the whole body) have oral manifestations, including swollen gums, mouth ulcers, dry mouth and/or excessive gum problems. Such systemic diseases include:

  • diabetes
  • leukemia
  • cancer
  • heart disease
  • kidney disease

Since most people have regular oral examinations, their dentist may be the first line of defense to diagnose a health problem in its early stages.

Failing to take care of your teeth and can actually lead to other health problems, including:

  • Oral and facial pain.  According to the Office of the Surgeon General, this pain may be largely due to infections of the gums that support the teeth and can lead to tooth loss. Gingivitis, an early stage of gum disease, and advanced gum disease affect more than 75 percent of the U.S. population.
  • Problems with the heart and other major organs.  Mouth infections can affect major organs. For example, the heart and heart valves can become inflamed by bacterial endocarditis, a condition that affects people with heart disease or anyone with damaged heart tissue.
  • Oral cancer. Poor oral care can contribute to oral cancer, which now takes more lives annually than cervical or skin cancer.
  • Digestion problems.  Digestion begins with physical and chemical processes in the mouth, and problems here can lead to intestinal failure, irritable bowel syndrome and other digestion disorders.

Seeing a dentist regularly helps to keep your mouth healthy and allows your dentist opportunities to examine developments that may point to other health issues.  A dental exam also can detect poor nutrition and hygiene and growth and development problems. As always, if you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact our office in Sandy Springs for a consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles


[1] “Gum Disease Links to Heart Disease and Stroke.” American Academy of Periodontology, May 8, 2008. www.perio.org/consumer/mbc.heart.htm

[2]JADA, 2006, Exploring the relationship between periodontal disease and pregnancy complications

Yiorgos A. Bobetsis, DDS, PhD, Silvana P. Barros, DDS, PhD and Steven Offenbacher, DDS, PhD, MMSc

Dentist Sandy Springs: New Directions in Oral Health Care

The hygienist plays an intricate role in your oral health care.  At a minimum the role includes periodontal disease evaluation, taking x-rays and a patient’s periodontal charting.  Traditionally, they engaged in cleaning and flossing the teeth under the theory that at healthy mouth was primarily necessary for the patient to keep their teeth.  While this is still the case,  discoveries in the last decade have uncovered the correlation between periodontal disease and other health related issues such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, cardiovascular disease, pregnancy related problems that assigns new priorities to the role of the hygienist and your dental visits.  These correlations have caused a new focus on evaluating a dental patient and new signals related to their overall health.   “The American Academy of Periodontology seeks to educate the public about research findings which support what dental professionals have long suspected: Infections in the mouth can play havoc elsewhere in the body. For a long time it was thought that bacteria was the factor that linked periodontal disease to other infections in the body; however, more recent research demonstrates that inflammation may link periodontal disease to other chronic conditions. Research has shown, and experts agree, that there is an association between periodontal diseases and other chronic inflammatory conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, treating inflammation may not only help manage periodontal diseases but may also help with the management of other chronic inflammatory conditions.” [1]

The U.S. Surgeon General agrees that oral health is a strong indicator of one’s overall health and well-being.[2]  Often, diseases give their first warning signs in the form of a patient’s oral problems.  Without consistent care and monitoring, several oral health problems can result.  Immediate risks include gingivitis, cavities, tooth decay, and other gum diseases which can eventually result in various types oral cancer.  There is a “silent epidemic”[3] that can be avoided by regular treatment at home and dental visits at least twice each year.  While practicing good oral hygiene at home is vital to your health, there is only so much that personal oral maintenance can do.  A normal person can easily overlook conditions that could greatly complicate or even end one’s life.  Thus, visiting your dentist for regular checkups is vital to a healthier smile.

“Routine dental exams uncover problems that can be easily treated in the early stages, when damage is minimal”.[4]   Now that it is known that gum disease can be a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and certain forms of cancer, regular visits to your dentist can help prevent and treat this disease.  By treating conditions early and learning from your dentist how to prevent oral diseases, you can achieve better health and ultimately better quality years of life.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328                                                                                            

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Serving residents in East Cobb, Roswell, Alpharetta, Johns Creek, Dunwoody, Buckhead and surrounding communities.

Related Articles


[2](CDC, 2006).

[3](U.S. Surgeon General).

[4](American Dental Association [ADA], 2008).