Red Wine, Over the Lips and Around the Mouth – Dentist Chamblee

Chamblee Dentist near me Drinking-Red-WineFor anyone searching for another reason to enjoy a glass of red wine with dinner, here’s a great one:

A new study has found that red wine, as well as grape seed extract, could potentially help prevent cavities.[1] They say this could lead to the development of natural products that ward off dental diseases with fewer side effects.  Cavities, periodontal disease and tooth loss affect an estimated 60 to 90 percent of the global population.[2]

This research has suggested that polyphenols, grape seed extract and wine can slow bacterial growth.  Red wine with or without alcohol and wine with grape seed extract was effective at getting rid of the bacteria found in the mouth.

The down side is you need to treat the stains caused by the red wine.  If we can be of help please give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

and

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related Article

https://therightsmile.wordpress.com/2014/03/

 

[1] Irene Muñoz-González, Thomas Thurnheer, Begoña Bartolomé, M. Victoria Moreno-Arribas. Red Wine and Oenological Extracts Display Antimicrobial Effects in an Oral Bacteria Biofilm Model. American Chemical Society’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2014; 62 (20): 4731 DOI: 10.1021/jf501768p

[2] http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140521133617.htm

 

Chamblee Dentist: Red or White Wine?

wineAfter a long day, a glass of wine may just be what’s in order, especially since so many studies have proven it to be so good for us.  Well, white wines just can’t catch a break.  Once again, white wine turns out to be a lot worse for teeth.[1]  However, it’s not the alcohol in the wine that bad for your teeth, but the acidity of the wine.  Apparently, the acid content of white wines like Chardonnay or Riesling destroys tooth enamel much faster than reds like Cabernet. The study recommends white wine drinkers munch on cheese, which supplies calcium to counteract the wine’s effect.  Essentially, consuming wine with food means the saliva you produce as you chew helps to neutralize its acidity and limits its erosive potential.   Therefore, you need to leave some time before brushing teeth to give the enamel a chance to recover from the acid attack or chew xylitol gum to make the enamel less susceptible to being brushed away.

Now red, with all its great antioxidant benefits doesn’t get off the hook.  The red wines can stain your teeth.  And according to the Mayo Clinic, research studies regarding the benefits of red wine in preventing heart disease have had mixed results. The evidence still isn’t clear whether red wine has more heart benefits than white wine or even beer.[2]

Whether you choose to drink red wine or white may just be a matter of preference.   And while there may be benefits to drinking wine, you should do so in moderation.[3] The risks of drinking too much of any alcoholic beverage can easily outweigh the good.

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1] http://www.newser.com/story/72188/white-wine-hurts-the-choppers.html , according to a German study of human teeth soaked in various kinds of wine.

[3] The Mayo Clinic states that moderation is defined as two drinks per day for men and one drink for women.

Dentist Dunwoody: Red or White Wine?

Dunwoody dentist near me
Red or White Wine, to be or not to be?

After a long day hard at work, a glass of wine may just be what’s in order.  Well, white wines just can’t catch a break.  Interestingly enough, white wine turns out to be a lot worse than red wines for teeth.[1]  And yet, it’s not the alcohol in the wine, but the acidity of the wine.

Apparently, the acid content of white wines like Chardonnay or Riesling destroys tooth enamel much faster than reds like Cabernet.  And to counter this effect, white wine drinkers are recommended to munch on cheese, which supplies calcium to counteract the wine’s effect.   Essentially, consuming wine with food means the saliva you produce as you chew helps to neutralize its acidity and limits its erosive potential.

In addition, you need to leave some time between drinking white wine and brushing teeth to give your enamel a chance to recover from the acid attack.  Another recommended solution, might be to chew xylitol gum to make the enamel less susceptible to being brushed away.

Now red, with all its great antioxidant benefits doesn’t get off the hook.  The red wines can stain your teeth.  And according to the Mayo Clinic, research studies regarding the benefits of red wine in preventing heart disease have had mixed results. The evidence still isn’t clear whether red wine has more heart benefits than white wine or even beer.[2]

Whether you choose to drink red wine or white may just be a matter of preference.   And while there may be benefits to drinking wine, you should do so in moderation.[3] The risks of drinking too much of any alcoholic beverage can easily outweigh the good.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

and

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 

[1] http://www.newser.com/story/72188/white-wine-hurts-the-choppers.html , according to a German study of human teeth soaked in various kinds of wine.

[2] http://www.livestrong.com/article/67623-red-wine-vs.-white-wine/#ixzz2fuduNxNe

 

[3] The Mayo Clinic states that moderation is defined as two drinks per day for men and one drink for women.

Dentist Sandy Springs: Red or White Wine?

wineAfter a long day, a glass of wine may just be what’s in order, especially since so many studies have proven it to be so good for us.  Well, white wines just can’t catch a break.  Once again, white wine turns out to be a lot worse for teeth.[1]  However, it’s not the alcohol in the wine that bad for your teeth, but the acidity of the wine.  Apparently, the acid content of white wines like Chardonnay or Riesling destroys tooth enamel much faster than reds like Cabernet. The study recommends white wine drinkers munch on cheese, which supplies calcium to counteract the wine’s effect.  Essentially, consuming wine with food means the saliva you produce as you chew helps to neutralize its acidity and limits its erosive potential.   Therefore, you need to leave some time before brushing teeth to give the enamel a chance to recover from the acid attack or chew xylitol gum to make the enamel less susceptible to being brushed away.

Now red, with all its great antioxidant benefits doesn’t get off the hook.  The red wines can stain your teeth.  And according to the Mayo Clinic, research studies regarding the benefits of red wine in preventing heart disease have had mixed results. The evidence still isn’t clear in 2009 whether red wine has more heart benefits than white wine or even beer.[2]

Whether you choose to drink red wine or white may just be a matter of preference.   And while there may be benefits to drinking wine, you should do so in moderation.[3] The risks of drinking too much of any alcoholic beverage can easily outweigh the good.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com


[1] http://www.newser.com/story/72188/white-wine-hurts-the-choppers.html, , according to a German study of human teeth soaked in various kinds of wine.

[3] The Mayo Clinic states that moderation is defined as two drinks per day for men and one drink for women.