Alpharetta Dentist: Regular Dental Check-ups

Alpharetta dentist near meOne of the most common reasons people avoid the dentist is they think everything is OK. The logic is simple: no pain means no problems. Unfortunately, most dental conditions including cavities, gum disease and oral cancer give little or no warning, because they may remain painless for months or even many years.  By the time a person is in pain, the dental problem is usually so advanced that the treatment required may be much more involved and costly, and may necessitate more down time after completion.  In addition, those patients who choose not to have regular dental visits have statistically higher global health costs.

Every day, your dentist sees patients with untreated cavities that eventually cause infection to the nerves and blood supply within the tooth. A tooth that may have only needed a simple and inexpensive filling a few months ago may now require a root canal, surgical removal of the tooth and/or a crown, costing thousands instead of hundreds for dollars.

The same is true for patients with gum disease. Gum disease can progress quietly for many years before it becomes advanced and teeth become loose or cause pain. While early gum disease can usually be treated with a deep cleaning under the gum, advanced gum disease may require gum surgery and antibiotics.

Oral cancer is another issue your dentist looks for on every dental examination. Tragically, those who avoid dental care are often the victims of aggressive forms of oral cancer that are difficult to treat. Those who wait for an unusual growth in the mouth to become painful may be taking a gamble. Oral cancer has a 50%, five-year fatality rate.

The moral of the story is very simple: visit your dentist at least twice a year for dental cleanings and check-up examinations.

It’s fairly inexpensive and you will save time and money, as well as significantly improve your oral health by treating all dental problems as soon as they occur. In fact, some research suggests that those in good dental health will actually live longer than people who do not take care of their teeth. It is also important for people without teeth to see their dentist at least once a year. The dentist will need to check the fit of removable dentures and also look for any signs of oral cancer.

We are a multi-specialty practice that has the expertise to diagnose and treat you under one roof.  If we can be of service, please give us a call or contact us for a consult.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Scheinfeld Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Sandy Springs Dentist: Poor Dental Health May Cause Dementia

Sandy Springs Dentist near meA recent analysis led by NIA scientists suggests that bacteria that cause gum disease are also associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, especially vascular dementia. The results were reported in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. This supports a 2013 study from the University of Central Lancashire School of Medicine and Dentistry. The2013 UCLS was the first to pinpoint a specific gum disease bacteria in the brain. In 2013, Researchers looked at donated brain samples of 10 people without dementia and 10 people with dementia. They found the bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis in the brains of four of those with dementia.

Previous lab studies have suggested that this is one mechanism influencing the cascade of events that leads to dementia, but large studies with people have not been conducted until recently to confirm this relationship. The 2020 NIA Intramural Research Program team examined whether gum disease and infections with oral bacteria were linked to dementia diagnoses and deaths using restricted data linkages with Medicare records and the National Death Index. The team compared different age groups at baseline, with up to 26 years of follow-up, for more than 6,000 participants.

The analysis revealed that older adults with signs of gum disease and mouth infections at baseline were more likely to develop Alzheimer’s during the study period.[1]

The findings suggest that oral infection preceded the diagnosis of the patient’s dementia. This indicates that maintaining one’s oral hygiene may be a factor in reducing the incidence of dementia. Call now for your hygiene check up.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

And

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com


[1] https://www.nia.nih.gov/news/large-study-links-gum-disease-dementia Beydoun M, et al. Clinical and bacterial markers of periodontitis and their association with incident all-cause and Alzheimer’s disease dementia in a large national surveyJournal of Alzheimer’s Disease. 2020;75(1):157-172. doi: 10.3233/JAD-200064.

Sandy Springs Dentist and Covid-19

Dentist near meWe are concerned that patients are putting off routine cleanings, which could compound health issues in the months or years to come.  As if patients need yet another reason to avoid the dentist.

Contrary to popular belief, dentistry is not an elective procedure. Maintaining your dental visits are important to your mouth health, as well as to the health of the rest of your body.

Bill Miller, an epidemiologist and physician at OSU, said it’s important to remember that going to the dentist isn’t the same as going to a barber or hair salon.  We have long been accustomed to dealing with the infectious-disease risk post the 1980’s HIV scare.  We have already been taking precautions because of our proximity to your mouth and its fluids.

Even before you walk through the door to see us, you’ll notice some changes.

Our offices are calling patients in advance of their appointment to ask whether they’re experiencing any common covid-19 symptoms, such as a fever, cough or muscle aches.

It’s pretty much the belief that social distancing is the best way to mitigate the spread of the novel coronavirus until there’s a vaccine. When that’s not possible, we wear face masks. But what happens when we need to visit our office? A lot.

We are adapting how we work in and around a patient’s mouth to account for this complicated reality. Our team is screening patients for symptoms, limiting the number of appointments in a day, implementing stringent sanitation protocols and wearing more protective equipment to guard against the respiratory disease.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization suggest that respiratory droplets expelled when an infected person coughs, sneezes, talks or breathes are the primary way the virus spreads. But the CDC reports there’s “no data available to assess the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission during dental practice”, because there are no reported cases arising from visiting the dentist.

Don’t skip you dental visit. Contact us for your dental cleaning and exam.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

And

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Dunwoody: Teeth Cleanings Save Money and Health

teeth cleaning near meSince the early 2000’s, adults have been visiting the dentist less and less.[1]  And the Great Recession of 2008 has only aggravated the trend.  We see it in our practice and know it is happening to our competitors’ practices as well.

The assumption is that you are saving money by extending the time between regular visits or by not going at all.  Not only is this assumption is wrong, but it costs patients their health as well as more money.

Patients who see their dentist on a regular basis save money in other health related treatment.  The research by United Concordia shows that patients who visit their dentist on a regular basis not only improve their overall global health but by extension save in reduced medical costs as well.[2]

Dentists not only improve your smile and maintain your oral health, we improve your overall lives.  So if you’re thinking about putting off that dental appointment because it can wait, think again.

If we can be of assistance or can answer any of your questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Brookhaven Dentist: Brush and Floss if you want to keep ‘em.

Brookhaven Dentist near me

Often we are asked questions such as ‘how often I should floss and is flossing really necessary’.  We are well known for saying “You should only brush and floss the teeth you want to keep!”  Because, brushing and flossing your teeth are the two most important patient activities you can do to ensure good oral health.

The goal is to reduce or rid your mouth of harmful bacteria that can adversely affect both your gums and teeth. Microscopic bacteria resides in your mouth, feeding off the food particles left on our teeth.

Bacteria produce acid from their feasting and  this acid eats into your tooth enamel creating cavities. Addition toxins are produced from bacteria in plaque that will inflame and irritate your gum tissue. And finally, without proper care the bacteria can also sulfur compounds that create bad breath.

In the most recent studies, poor oral health can be linked to other related health issues that may stem from oral bacteria entering the bloodstream affecting other internal organs.  Regular brushing and flossing removes the plaque and the bacteria plaque contains. Unfortunately, many people think brushing alone is sufficient to rid the mouth of these bacteria.   But flossing is a key component to your good oral hygiene program.

If you do not floss and allow plaque to remain in between teeth it eventually hardens into a substance known as tartar. Unlike plaque which can be easily removed by brushing, tartar can only be removed by your dentist.

Over time, failing to floss will result in irritated and inflamed gums. This condition is known as gingivitis, which if left untreated can progress to periodontal disease domino’ing into gingival recession, bone loss, loose teeth, and so on until ultimately your teeth are lost.

Timely and regular flossing removes the bacteria that escapes the reach of the toothbrush.  Brushing alone only does part of the job.  So you really need to floss. The American Dental Association recommends that you floss at least once a day, but we would suggest once in the morning and once in the evening as the better protocol.

Hanna Orland, DMD

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Chamblee: The Importance of Oral Hygiene

Chamblee Dentist near meYour young and you have no dental needs.  Not so fast.  Good oral hygiene is important towards maintaining your overall health.   It is generally appreciated within the dental and medical community that poor oral health can be linked to heart and lung disease, diabetes, stroke, extremely high-birth weight, and premature births. The presence of oral problems is usually the first warning sign of some of these general health issues.  This consensus among the various healthcare providers has risen to level that the U.S. Surgeon General has issued policy statements on oral health as a strong indicator of overall health and well-being (CDC, 2006).

Brushing and flossing have risen in importance as your key ‘between visits’ maintenance tools.  In addition, the use of the proper products for home care, such as an electric toothbrush, ADA approved toothpastes and washes are equally important.  Without consistent care, several general as well as oral health problems may result or be exacerbated.  For all ages, if your water is not fluoridated or the majority of your water consumption is through bottled water you should consult with your dental care provider about using supplemental fluoride.  In areas without fluoride in the water the rate of tooth decay and other health issues is much higher.

While practicing good oral hygiene is vital to your health, there is only so much that brushing and flossing can do.  Your average patient can easily overlook conditions that could greatly complicate or even end one’s life.  So, visiting your dentist for regular checkups is a vital part of your overall health care.  “Routine dental exams uncover problems that can be easily treated in the early stages, when damage is minimal” (American Dental Association [ADA], 2008).  Since gum disease is acknowledged as a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and certain forms of cancer, regular visits to your dentist can help prevent and treat these potential diseases.  By treating conditions early and learning from your dentist how to prevent oral health issues, you can achieve better overall health and ultimately better the quality of your life.

Your dental care is so important to your general health care; you need to make sure you find a dentist that is right for you and your family.  This can be a difficult process.  Look for someone who’s competent and you feel comfortable with, one you can have a collaborative relationship with. This is important because there are conditions and problems that were not discussed in this article that the dentist will need to pay attention to during your regular checkups. Hopefully after reading this article, you will have a heightened understanding of the basic need for good oral health.  If you have additional questions or concerns feel free to contact us.

Dr. Scheinfeld is an Emory University School of Dentistry trained prosthodontist treating patients in the Sandy Springs, East Cobb, Dunwoody, Roswell, Johns Creek, Alpharetta, Vinings and Buckhead areas of Metro Atlanta.  Of the 170,000 dentists in the U.S., less than 2% are prosthodontist.  She practices with her two daughters who graduated from Dental College of Georgia.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

 

Resource information provided by:

The American Dental Association http://www.ada.org/

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2006, December). Oral Health for Adults. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Division of Oral Health. Retrieved February 6, 2009 from http://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/publications/factsheets/adult.htm

Oral health in America: Summary of the surgeon general’s report. (2006, April 16). Retrieved February 7, 2009, from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/Oralhealth/publications/factsheets/sgr2000_05.htm

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Dentist Dunwoody: Teeth Cleanings and Your Oral Hygiene

Dunwoody Dentist near me.Good oral hygiene is preeminent in maintaining your overall health.   Poor oral health has been linked to heart and lung disease, diabetes, stroke, extremely high-birth weight, and premature births.  Often, diseases give their first warning signs in the form of oral problems.

There are four basic steps to maintain good oral health:

  1. Brush at least twice daily.
  2. Floss every day.
  3. Limit your consumption of junk food.
  4. Visit the dentist regularly.

When brushing and flossing, the proper technique is important.  Also, using the right products is equally important.[1] Without consistent care, several oral health problems can result.  Risks of gingivitis, cavities, tooth decay, and other gum diseases can lead to oral cancer or tooth loss.[2]

Here are some simple lifestyle changes that will improve oral health:

  1. Set an example for your children by practicing good oral health care habits.
  2. Check your children’s mouth for bleeding gums, swollen gums, gums receding away from teeth.
  3. Check for bad breath.
  4. Eat a balanced and nutritional diet.
  5. Educate your children about the health risks of tobacco use.[3]

Age-specific recommendations.

Infants:

  • For mothers to be, tetracycline is a no no.[4]
  • Teething usually starts at around 6 months and should be brushed and flossed daily.
  • Avoid baby bottle decay by not allowing your baby to fall asleep with a bottle full of juice or milk.[5]
  • If your water is not fluoridated, ask your doctor about daily fluoride supplements.[6]

Toddlers/Children:

  • Thumb sucking is a natural reflex for toddlers, but the habit may result in permanent bite issues.[7]
  • Make sure to use a pea-size amount of fluoride toothpaste when brushing your child’s teeth.
  • At age two (2) schedule regular dental appointments.

Teenagers:

  • Emphasize the importance of oral hygiene.
  • Again, set a good example by practicing good oral hygiene yourself.
  • Keep junk foods to a minimum for snacking.
  • Discourage oral piercings as they increase the risk for oral infections and can cause injury to their teeth.

Adults:

  • Brush twice daily, maybe more when possible.
  • Floss at least once a day
  • Watch for signs of gum disease such as redness, swelling or tenderness.[8]
  • Visit the dentist at least twice each year for regular check-ups.[9]
  • Limit sugary foods and soft drinks.

While practicing good oral hygiene is vital to your health, there is only so much that personal oral maintenance can do, so visiting your dentist for regular checkups is vital to your global health.[10]

The following is a list of reasons why you should visit your dentist frequently:

1) To prevent gum disease[11]

2) To prevent oral cancer[12]

3) To avoid losing your teeth[13]

4) To prevent dental emergencies[14]

5) To help maintain good overall health[15]

If we can be of service or answer any of your concerns, please call our office for a complimentary consult.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Article Sources:

Colgate World of Care http://www.colgate.com/app/Colgate/US/OC/Information/OralHealthBasics/GoodOralHygiene/OralHygieneBasics/FamilyGuideOralHealth.cvsp

Learn4Good http://www.learn4good.com/health/dental_health.htm

Caucus Educational Corporation http://www.caucusnj.org/caucusnj/special_series/oralhealth/importance.asp

U.S. Surgeon General http://www.perio.org/consumer/children.news.htm

“Top 5 Reasons to Visit the Dentist” by Tammy Davenport http://dentistry.about.com/od/dentalhealth/tp/visit_dentist.htm

The Oral Cancer Foundation http://www.oralcancerfoundation.org/

The American Dental Association http://www.ada.org/

Colgate Family Guide to Oral Care http://www.colgate.com/app/Colgate/US/OC/Information/OralHealthBasics/GoodOralHygiene/OralHygieneBasics/FamilyGuideOralHealth.cvsp

About the ADA seal of acceptance. (2005, March 14). Retrieved February 7, 2009, from American Dental Association Web site: http://www.ada.org/ada/seal/index.asp

American Dental Association News Releases. (2008, February 4). A reminder to parents: Early dental visits essential to children’s health. American Dental Association. Retrieve February 6, 2009, from http://ada.org/public/media/releases/0802_release01.asp

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2006, December). Oral Health for Adults. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Division of Oral Health. Retrieved February 6, 2009 from http://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/publications/factsheets/adult.htm

Oral health in America: Summary of the surgeon general’s report. (2006, April 16). Retrieved February 7, 2009, from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/Oralhealth/publications/factsheets/sgr2000_05.htm

 


[1] When buying any dental products, look for the American Dental Association Seal of Acceptance. The ADA seal is an important symbol of the dental product’s safety and effectiveness (ADA Seal, 2005).

[2] This “silent epidemic” (U.S. Surgeon General) can be avoided by regular treatment at home and dental visits twice each year.

[3] Smoking is the number one preventable risk factor for gum diseases.

[4] A common antibiotic that causes tooth discoloration to your child and should not be used by nursing mothers or by expectant mothers in the last half of pregnancy.

[5] Try water or a pacifier and make sure to wipe teeth and gums with a gentle cloth or gums after feeding

[6] Fluoride is very important even before teeth start forming.

[7] Buck teeth or overbite.

[8] Contact your dentist if you experience any of these symptoms.

[9] Generally, plaque begins forming to maturity about every 3 months.

[10] “Routine dental exams uncover problems that can be easily treated in the early stages, when damage is minimal” (American Dental Association [ADA], 2008).

[11] Gum disease, specifically gingivitis, is a leading cause of tooth decay and tooth loss. If gum disease is discovered and diagnosed early, it can be treated. However, if left untreated, gum disease can become periodontitis, a more severe and irreversible stage. This may lead to serious damage of the gum tissue and jaw bone, causing your teeth to fall out. This late stage of gum disease can also increase your risk of developing a heart attack or stroke.

[12] According to the Oral Cancer Foundation, a United States citizen will die from this type of cancer every hour of every day. Of similar concern is the fact that out of the 34,000 newly diagnosed Americans every year, only half of these people will be alive in the next five years. However, while attending your regular dental checkup, your dentist and oral hygienist screen you for this specific cancer. If diagnosed early, there is a good chance that oral cancer can be treated successfully.

[13] Without your teeth, normal eating habits can obviously be far more difficult. Also, taking care of your natural teeth now will help you avoid paying for dentures later. As stated previously, gum disease can easily lead to adult tooth loss, but regular visits to your dentist and good oral hygiene can prevent it.

[14] Toothaches, a broken jaw, chipped teeth, and other dental emergencies can be easily avoided with regular dental visits. Early signs or symptoms of these unpleasant conditions can be detected and treated by your dentist. If left untreated, you may have to endure root canals or forced tooth removals- these treatments are significantly more expensive than preventative care such as regular check-ups (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2006).

[15] Since gum disease is a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and certain forms of cancer, regular visits to your dentist can help prevent and treat this disease. By treating conditions early and learning from your dentist how to prevent oral damage, you can achieve better health and ultimately better quality years of life.

Antibiotic Effectiveness? – Dentist Sandy Springs

Polypharmacy
Premedication before your teeth cleanings?

Do you still need to pre-medicate from that knee surgery?

In its recent report, “Antimicrobial Resistance: Global Report on Surveillance,” the World Health Organization (WHO) cautions about the overwhelming consequences of antibiotics losing their effectiveness to fight disease, as the risk of diseases that have been controlled could surface again.

Apparently, there is an ongoing debate about the use of antibiotics post surgery that is unsettled.  The professionals are still trying to work out the recommendations to the patient.  While there may be a link between periodontal disease, bacteria freed from cleanings, the risk of infection appears suspect after a year or two.  We are no longer recommending or requiring that you pre-medicate before treatment and are deferring to your physician for that judgment call.

http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2014/09/antibiotics-losing-effectiveness-around-the-globe.html

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

 

How Much Does a Teeth Cleaning Cost? Dentist Sandy Springs

Oral Cancer
Oral Cancer screening

So you see an offer of $49.95 for an exam & x-ray.  Is it a loss leader used to get you in and pressure you into other dental procedures?  Absolutely, yes.

You need to be careful when you are considering your oral health care.  The teeth ARE CONNECTED are to the rest of your body.  And in our Sandy Springs office we don’t administer oral health care in the hopes of finding something wrong.  Our goal is to keep you in the best health possible.

Generally, if you are not lured to take care of your health based on price, a teeth cleaning charge is going to range somewhere around $65 to $94.[1] Often dental insurance will cover some or all of this cost for a specific number of cleanings per year, usually no more than two.  The doctor’s exam is $45 to $55 and the 4 basic bite wing x-rays are around $59 to $72.  Depending on your insurance this might be covered anywhere from 60 to 100% after a small deductible is met.   Periodic X-rays ($32 -$135) are needed to see if any problems are developing inside the teeth or around the jaw bone, and are generally required before cleaning the teeth of a new patient (which is why some practices offer coupons as a loss-leader for the initial cost of a first visit). These are also often covered by dental insurance.

The main goal is to prevent gum disease, which is the primary cause of tooth loss. Other aspects of your exam are checking for oral cancer signs and, more and more, other global health indicators. But most important, dental hygiene is imperative, and cleaning your teeth is the first step towards preserving them.  In a standard cleaning, a dental hygienist removes soft plaque and hard tartar from above and below the gum line on all the teeth. The process requires one office visit and usually takes about 30 to 60 minutes.

Again, your goal is a healthy mouth which an integral part of your overall health.  Oh, and by the way, just because you had your teeth cleaned professionally, the jobs not done.  You have to do your part by brushing and flossing daily if you want to keep them.   If you have additional questions, feel free to email or call our office.  As a part of our services, we offer additional consultation and oversight by our in-house perio-team.  Our goal here is to create an informed healthy patient.

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related Articles

[1] However, depending on how long it’s been since you have been to the dentist and what extent your oral healthcare has been neglected, it can be more if there’s a need to do a full mouth root scaling.

Dentist Alpharetta: Teeth Cleanings Save Money and Health

mature women smiling3Since the early 2000’s, adults have been visiting the dentist less.[1]  And the Great Recession has only aggravated the trend.  We see it in our practice and know it is happening in our competitors’ practices as well.  The assumption is that the patient is saving money by extending the time between regular visits or by not going at all.  Not only is this assumption is wrong, but it costs patients their health as well as more money.

Patients who see their dentist on a regular basis save money in adjunctive health treatment.  New research by United Concordia shows that patients who visit their dentist on a regular basis not only improve their overall global health but by extension save in reduced medical costs as well.[2]

Dentists not only improve your smile and maintain your oral health, they improve your overall lives.  So if you’re thinking about putting off that dental appointment because it can wait, think again.

If we can be of assistance or can answer any of your questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

 

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