Dunwoody Dentist: Are You Thumbing Your Mouth At Me?

 Dunwoody dentist near meOur goal is to educate patients about the importance of oral health, its advances and how the right smile can change one’s life.

If you have a new born or have one on the way, you’re going find out that infants have a natural instinct to suck as a way of nourishing and soothing themselves. Often, this leads to the child sucking on their fingers, a blanket, a stuffed animal or their thumb. Usually, this habit is given up by age 4. If it continues, it can be extremely detrimental to the development of their teeth and jaws causing crooked teeth, an incorrect bite, speech problems and/or open-mouth breathing. This habit may result in psychological trauma if it continues into school age when the other children tease them.

What should a parent do? If possible, try to switch them to a properly designed pacifier that fits the shape of the mouth. Pacifiers are less likely to create the same developmental problems [by distributing forces over greater area], are usually discarded by the child at an earlier age and are easier to hide than a thumb. If the thumb sucking is during the day, discuss the problem with them to discourage the habit. Placing a band-aid on their thumb as a reminder may help. Be positive and praise them when they remember. And reward them for their success.

It is more difficult to control thumb sucking when the child is asleep, because the child is unaware of this involuntary action. So, try this habit-breaking technique that is usually successful within two weeks. Before your child goes to bed, wrap a 2-inch wide ace bandage lightly around their fully extended arm [straight]. Start about 3 inches from their armpit and continue down past the elbow. This will not prevent your child from putting their thumb into their mouth. However, as soon as they fall asleep, the tension created by bending the elbow will pull the thumb from their mouth.

If your child is still sucking on their thumb or anything else by the time their permanent teeth erupt [around age 6], please call it to the attention of our office.

Novy Scheinfeld DDS PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Scheinfeld Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Dr, 200A
Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328
(404) 256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076


info@rightsmilecenter.com
rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Brookhaven: Are You Thumbing Your Mouth At Me?

Brookhaven dentist near meOur goal is to educate patients about the importance of oral health, its advances and how the right smile can change one’s life.

If you have a new born or have one on the way, you’re going find out that infants have a natural instinct to suck as a way of nourishing and soothing themselves. Often, this leads to the child sucking on their fingers, a blanket, a stuffed animal or their thumb. Usually, this habit is given up by age 4. If it continues, it can be extremely detrimental to the development of their teeth and jaws causing crooked teeth, an incorrect bite, speech problems and/or open-mouth breathing. This habit may result in psychological trauma if it continues into school age when the other children tease them.

What should a parent do? If possible, try to switch them to a properly designed pacifier that fits the shape of the mouth. Pacifiers are less likely to create the same developmental problems [by distributing forces over greater area], are usually discarded by the child at an earlier age and are easier to hide than a thumb. If the thumb sucking is during the day, discuss the problem with them to discourage the habit. Placing a band-aid on their thumb as a reminder may help. Be positive and praise them when they remember. And reward them for their success.

It is more difficult to control thumb sucking when the child is asleep, because the child is unaware of this involuntary action. So, try this habit-breaking technique that is usually successful within two weeks. Before your child goes to bed, wrap a 2-inch wide ace bandage lightly around their fully extended arm [straight]. Start about 3 inches from their armpit and continue down past the elbow. This will not prevent your child from putting their thumb into their mouth. However, as soon as they fall asleep, the tension created by bending the elbow will pull the thumb from their mouth.

If your child is still sucking on their thumb or anything else by the time their permanent teeth erupt [around age 6], please call it to the attention of our office.

Novy Scheinfeld DDS PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Related articles

Brookhaven Dentists: Are You Thumbing Your Mouth At Me?

Brookhaven Dentist near me

Our goal at the Right Smile Center, is to educate patients about the importance of oral health, its advances and how the right smile can change one’s life.

If you have a new born or have one on the way, you’re going find out that infants have a natural instinct to suck as a way of nourishing and soothing themselves. Often, this leads to the child sucking on their fingers, a blanket, a stuffed animal or their thumb. Usually, this habit is given up by age 4. If it continues, it can be extremely detrimental to the development of their teeth and jaws causing crooked teeth, an incorrect bite, speech problems and/or open-mouth breathing. This habit may result in psychological trauma if it continues into school age when the other children tease them.

What should a parent do? If possible, try to switch them to a properly designed pacifier that fits the shape of the mouth. Pacifiers are less likely to create the same developmental problems [by distributing forces over greater area], are usually discarded by the child at an earlier age and are easier to hide than a thumb. If the thumb sucking is during the day, discuss the problem with them to discourage the habit. Placing a band-aid on their thumb as a reminder may help. Be positive and praise them when they remember. And reward them for their success.

It is more difficult to control thumb sucking when the child is asleep, because the child is unaware of this involuntary action. So, try this habit-breaking technique that is usually successful within two weeks. Before your child goes to bed, wrap a 2-inch wide ace bandage lightly around their fully extended arm [straight]. Start about 3 inches from their armpit and continue down past the elbow. This will not prevent your child from putting their thumb into their mouth. However, as soon as they fall asleep, the tension created by bending the elbow will pull the thumb from their mouth.

If your child is still sucking on their thumb or anything else by the time their permanent teeth erupt [around age 6], please call it to the attention of our office.

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

and

Novy Scheinfeld DDS PC
290 Carpenter Dr, 200A
Atlanta, GA 30328
(404) 256-3620


info@rightsmilecenter.com
http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Sandy Springs: Do Children Grind Their Teeth?

Sandy Springs dentist near me
Teeth worn down by grinding.

The problem of bruxism, otherwise known as teeth grinding, is not limited to adults.  According WebMD, approximately 15% to 33% of children grind their teeth. Children who grind their teeth tend to do so at two peak times in their lives – (1) when their baby teeth emerge and (2) when their permanent teeth come in.[1]  Some of this potential grinding is protected or goes unnoticed because of thumb sucking, which can cause a different set of problems.   However, most children who do not suck their thumbs while sleeping lose the teeth grinding habit shortly after these two sets of teeth have come in more fully.

While it is more common for children grinding their teeth to do it during sleep rather than during waking hours, it has not been determined exactly why children grind their teeth.  There are several theories which include improperly aligned teeth or irregular contact between upper and lower teeth, illnesses and other medical conditions (such as nutritional deficiencies, pinworm, allergies, endocrine disorders), and psychological factors including anxiety and stress, and all of which appear to be unsubstantiated theory.

The main reason there has been very little study on children grinding their baby teeth is that it rarely results in problems.  However, teeth grinding can cause jaw pain, headaches, wear on the teeth, and TMD.[2]  Consult your dentist if your child’s teeth look worn or if your child complains of tooth sensitivity or pain.

Should teeth grinding result in a real problem for your child, here are some specific tips to help stop teeth grinding:[3]

  1. Where possible, decrease your child’s stress, especially just before bedtime.
  2. Try massage and stretching exercises to relax the muscles.
  3. Make sure your child’s diet includes plenty of water. There is some thought that dehydration may be linked to teeth grinding.
  4. Ask your dentist to monitor your child’s teeth if he or she is a grinder.  Possibly consult a pedodontist (children’s dentist) and pediatrician if it becomes apparent that damage is occurring.

No intervention is usually required with preschool-age children. However, older children may need temporary crowns or other methods, such as a night guard, to prevent the grinding in their sleep. Feel free to contact us.

Dr. Scheinfeld is an Emory trained prosthodontist specializing in mandibular form and function.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1] WebMD, Teeth Grinding (Bruxism) July 5, 2011

[3] WebMD, Teeth Grinding (Bruxism) July 5, 2011

 

Are You Thumbing Your Mouth At Me? Sandy Springs Dentists

Our goal is to educate patients about the importance of oral health, its advances and how the right smile can change one’s life.

Children Thumb sucking
Children Thumb Sucking

If you have a new born or have one on the way, you’re going find out that infants have a natural instinct to suck as a way of nourishing and soothing themselves. Often, this leads to the child sucking on their fingers, a blanket, a stuffed animal or their thumb. Usually, this habit is given up by age 4. If it continues, it can be extremely detrimental to the development of their teeth and jaws causing crooked teeth, an incorrect bite, speech problems and/or open-mouth breathing. This habit may result in psychological trauma if it continues into school age when the other children tease them.

What should a parent do? If possible, try to switch them to a properly designed pacifier that fits the shape of the mouth. Pacifiers are less likely to create the same developmental problems [by distributing forces over greater area], are usually discarded by the child at an earlier age and are easier to hide than a thumb. If the thumb sucking is during the day, discuss the problem with them to discourage the habit. Placing a band-aid on their thumb as a reminder may help. Be positive and praise them when they remember. And reward them for their success.

It is more difficult to control thumb sucking when the child is asleep, because the child is unaware of this involuntary action. So, try this habit-breaking technique that is usually successful within two weeks. Before your child goes to bed, wrap a 2-inch wide ace bandage lightly around their fully extended arm [straight]. Start about 3 inches from their armpit and continue down past the elbow. This will not prevent your child from putting their thumb into their mouth. However, as soon as they fall asleep, the tension created by bending the elbow will pull the thumb from their mouth.

If your child is still sucking on their thumb or anything else by the time their permanent teeth erupt [around age 6], please call it to the attention of our office.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC
290 Carpenter Dr, 200A
Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328
(404) 256-3620


info@rightsmilecenter.com
http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

 

Sandy Springs Dental: Are You Thumbing Your Mouth At Me?

Our goal at Scheinfeld, Tourial and Kopp, is to educate patients about the importance of oral health, its advances and how the right smile can change one’s life.

If you have a new born or have one on the way, you’re going find out that infants have a natural instinct to suck as a way of nourishing and soothing themselves. Often, this leads to the child sucking on their fingers, a blanket, a stuffed animal or their thumb. Usually, this habit is given up by age 4. If it continues, it can be extremely detrimental to the development of their teeth and jaws causing crooked teeth, an incorrect bite, speech problems and/or open-mouth breathing. This habit may result in psychological trauma if it continues into school age when the other children tease them.

What should a parent do? If possible, try to switch them to a properly designed pacifier that fits the shape of the mouth. Pacifiers are less likely to create the same developmental problems [by distributing forces over greater area], are usually discarded by the child at an earlier age and are easier to hide than a thumb. If the thumb sucking is during the day, discuss the problem with them to discourage the habit. Placing a band-aid on their thumb as a reminder may help. Be positive and praise them when they remember. And reward them for their success.

It is more difficult to control thumb sucking when the child is asleep, because the child is unaware of this involuntary action. So, try this habit-breaking technique that is usually successful within two weeks. Before your child goes to bed, wrap a 2-inch wide ace bandage lightly around their fully extended arm [straight]. Start about 3 inches from their armpit and continue down past the elbow. This will not prevent your child from putting their thumb into their mouth. However, as soon as they fall asleep, the tension created by bending the elbow will pull the thumb from their mouth.

If your child is still sucking on their thumb or anything else by the time their permanent teeth erupt [around age 6], please call it to the attention of our office.

Novy Scheinfeld DDS PC
290 Carpenter Drive, 200A
Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328
(404) 256-3620
receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com
http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

 

Related articles

Alpharetta Dentist: Are You Thumbing Your Mouth At Me?

Dentist near me

Our goal is to educate patients about the importance of oral health, its advances and how the right smile can change one’s life.

If you have a new born or have one on the way, you’re going find out that infants have a natural instinct to suck as a way of nourishing and soothing themselves. Often, this leads to the child sucking on their fingers, a blanket, a stuffed animal or their thumb. Usually, this habit is given up by age 4. If it continues, it can be extremely detrimental to the development of their teeth and jaws causing crooked teeth, an incorrect bite, speech problems and/or open-mouth breathing. This habit may result in psychological trauma if it continues into school age when the other children tease them.

What should a parent do? If possible, try to switch them to a properly designed pacifier that fits the shape of the mouth. Pacifiers are less likely to create the same developmental problems [by distributing forces over greater area], are usually discarded by the child at an earlier age and are easier to hide than a thumb. If the thumb sucking is during the day, discuss the problem with them to discourage the habit. Placing a band-aid on their thumb as a reminder may help. Be positive and praise them when they remember. And reward them for their success.

It is more difficult to control thumb sucking when the child is asleep, because the child is unaware of this involuntary action. So, try this habit-breaking technique that is usually successful within two weeks. Before your child goes to bed, wrap a 2-inch wide ace bandage lightly around their fully extended arm [straight]. Start about 3 inches from their armpit and continue down past the elbow. This will not prevent your child from putting their thumb into their mouth. However, as soon as they fall asleep, the tension created by bending the elbow will pull the thumb from their mouth.

If your child is still sucking on their thumb or anything else by the time their permanent teeth erupt [around age 6], please call it to the attention of our office.

Novy Scheinfeld DDS PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A
Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328
(404) 256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076
info@rightsmilecenter.com
www.rightsmilecenter.com