Tooth Root Exposed? Not good… Dentist Sandy Springs

Sandy Springs Dentist root exposureAre you the patient coming in with severe gum recession where the root is exposed in front of your tooth?  You don’t have symptoms, yet, it just looks strange and you want to know if there is a problem.  We’re a multi-specialty practice with in-house periodontal treatment.  And in a healthy mouth, the tooth roots are not exposed.  If they are exposed, it’s usually a sign of one of these problems:

  • Gingivitis or Periodontitis.  Gum disease can cause the gum tissue to pull away from the tooth, and expose the root.
  • Brushing too hard.  Aggressive tooth brushing can cause the gums to recede.  We recommend soft tooth brushes to prevent this from happening.  Soft tooth brushes used properly minimize the trauma to the tissue and bone.
  • And on rare occasions tooth developed outside of the jaw bone.  In this case, we highly recommend seeing a periodontist to determine the best form of treatment.

So if you have an exposed tooth root, you need to see us at one of our two officesOur dental team will determine the quality and quantity of the gum tissue that remains.  If the gum recession is caught early, the tissue can be treated until healthy, replaced and your tooth may have an excellent prognosis.

We offer complimentary consultations.  Please allow us to help you if your gums are receding.  Call now for your free consult.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Atlanta’s most respected Prosthodontist — therightsmile.wordpress.com

 

Chamblee Dentist: Brush and Floss the ones you want to keep.

Chamblee Dentist near meOften I am asked questions such as how often I should floss and is flossing really necessary.  I am famous for saying “You should only brush and floss the teeth you want to keep!”  Brushing and flossing your teeth are the two most important patient activities you can do to ensure good oral health. 

The goal of brushing and flossing is to reduce or rid your mouth of harmful bacteria that can adversely affect both your gums and teeth. Microscopic bacteria reside in your mouth calling it home, feeding off the food particles left on our teeth.

Bacteria produce acid from their feasting and this acid eats into your tooth enamel creating cavities. Addition toxins are produced from bacteria in plaque that will inflame and irritate your gum tissue. And finally, without proper care the bacteria can also sulfur compounds that create bad breath.

In the most recent studies, poor oral health can be linked to other related health issues that may stem from oral bacteria entering the bloodstream affecting other internal organs.  Regular brushing and flossing removes the plaque and the bacteria plaque contains. Unfortunately, many people think brushing alone is sufficient to rid the mouth of these bacteria.   But flossing is a key component to your good oral hygiene program.

If you do not floss and allow plaque to remain in between teeth it eventually hardens into a substance known as tartar. Unlike plaque which can be easily removed by brushing, tartar can only be removed by your dentist.

Over time, failing to floss will result in irritated and inflamed gums. This condition is known as gingivitis, which if left untreated can progress to periodontal disease domino’ing into gingival recession, bone loss, loose teeth, and so on until ultimately your teeth are lost.

Timely and regular flossing removes the bacteria that escapes the reach of the toothbrush.  Brushing alone only does part of the job.  So you really need to floss. The American Dental Association recommends that you floss at least once a day, but I would suggest once in the morning and once in the evening as the better protocol.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road,

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

 

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

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Woodstock, GA Dentist: Brush and Floss if you want to keep ‘em.

Often I am asked questions such as how often I should floss and is flossing really necessary.  I am famous for saying “You should only brush and floss the teeth you want to keep!”  Brushing and flossing your teeth are the two most important patient activities you can do to ensure good oral health. 

The goal of brushing and flossing is to reduce or rid your mouth of harmful bacteria that can adversely affect both your gums and teeth. Microscopic bacteria reside in your mouth calling it home, feeding off the food particles left on our teeth.

Bacteria produce acid from their feasting and this acid eats into your tooth enamel creating cavities. Addition toxins are produced from bacteria in plaque that will inflame and irritate your gum tissue. And finally, without proper care the bacteria can also sulfur compounds that create bad breath.

In the most recent studies, poor oral health can be linked to other related health issues that may stem from oral bacteria entering the bloodstream affecting other internal organs.  Regular brushing and flossing removes the plaque and the bacteria plaque contains. Unfortunately, many people think brushing alone is sufficient to rid the mouth of these bacteria.   But flossing is a key component to your good oral hygiene program.

If you do not floss and allow plaque to remain in between teeth it eventually hardens into a substance known as tartar. Unlike plaque which can be easily removed by brushing, tartar can only be removed by your dentist.

Over time, failing to floss will result in irritated and inflamed gums. This condition is known as gingivitis, which if left untreated can progress to periodontal disease domino’ing into gingival recession, bone loss, loose teeth, and so on until ultimately your teeth are lost.

Timely and regular flossing removes the bacteria that escapes the reach of the toothbrush.  Brushing alone only does part of the job.  So you really need to floss. The American Dental Association recommends that you floss at least once a day, but I would suggest once in the morning and once in the evening as the better protocol.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

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Dentist Serving Roswell – 4 Steps to Promoting Good Oral Health

Dental floss
Image via Wikipedia

Good oral hygiene is important for maintaining one’s overall health.  If you believe this and you should, then there are 4 essential guidelines of preventative care to maintaining good oral health, all of which are endorsed by the American Dental Association:

  1. Floss regularly and floss first- It is recommended that individuals floss on a regular basis after meals and before brushing their teeth.  The reason to floss first is to dislodge any food particles trapped in between your teeth, which can be disposed of while brushing.  The proper way to floss is to push the floss gently between your teeth to the gum to loosen debris your toothbrush cannot reach. Initially, you may experience some light bleeding but this should disappear once your gums get used to the flossing process.
  1. Brushing your teeth- If you don’t have an electric toothbrush, good brushing by hand should take a minimum of 2 minutes and should involve brushing in a circular motion, which the electric toothbrush does for you.  You work your way from one side of the mouth to the other, keeping in mind to pay attention to certain neglected areas such as the very back teeth and your tongue. Dentists recommend using soft bristle brushes and toothpaste that contain fluoride.  The fluoride is important, because the rise in the consumption of bottled water has led to the population’s decline in fluoride intake.
  1. Mouthwash- I am not sure how effective this is, but if you’re not going to brush twice a day, using a mouthwash that contains fluoride at least twice a day is a good preventative measure that kills the bacteria responsible for cavities and gum disease.  Given recent research, you might want to choose a non-alcohol based rinse.

 

  1. Your Dental visits- Maintaining your oral health requires regular dental visits at least every six months.  You need to do this for early detection of potential global health problems that could develop into more serious issues and the hygienist can clean areas that might have been missed or that were resistant to the 3 steps above.

Finally, Finding a Dentist that is Right for You

Research shows that your dental care is an important aspect of your overall general health care.  So you need to make sure you find a dentist that is right for you. This can be a difficult process.  Look for someone who’s competent and you feel comfortable with, one you can have a collaborative relationship with. This is important because there are conditions and problems that were not discussed in this article that the dentist will need to pay attention to during your regular checkups. Hopefully after reading this article, you will have a better understanding of the basics for good oral health.   I you have questions or concerns feel free to contact or call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com

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Alpharetta Dental: Brush and Floss if you want to keep ‘em.

Often I am asked questions such as how often I should floss and is flossing really necessary.  I am famous for saying “You should only brush and floss the teeth you want to keep!”  Brushing and flossing your teeth are the two most important patient activities you can do to ensure good oral health. 

The goal of brushing and flossing is to reduce or rid your mouth of harmful bacteria that can adversely affect both your gums and teeth. Microscopic bacteria reside in your mouth calling it home, feeding off the food particles left on our teeth.

Bacteria produce acid from their feasting and this acid eats into your tooth enamel creating cavities. Addition toxins are produced from bacteria in plaque that will inflame and irritate your gum tissue. And finally, without proper care the bacteria can also sulfur compounds that create bad breath.

In the most recent studies, poor oral health can be linked to other related health issues that may stem from oral bacteria entering the bloodstream affecting other internal organs.  Regular brushing and flossing removes the plaque and the bacteria plaque contains. Unfortunately, many people think brushing alone is sufficient to rid the mouth of these bacteria.   But flossing is a key component to your good oral hygiene program.

If you do not floss and allow plaque to remain in between teeth it eventually hardens into a substance known as tartar. Unlike plaque which can be easily removed by brushing, tartar can only be removed by your dentist.

Over time, failing to floss will result in irritated and inflamed gums. This condition is known as gingivitis, which if left untreated can progress to periodontal disease domino’ing into gingival recession, bone loss, loose teeth, and so on until ultimately your teeth are lost.

Timely and regular flossing removes the bacteria that escapes the reach of the toothbrush.  Brushing alone only does part of the job.  So you really need to floss. The American Dental Association recommends that you floss at least once a day, but I would suggest once in the morning and once in the evening as the better protocol.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A                                                 

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

receptionist@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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