Dentist Sandy Springs: How much does having a tooth pulled cost?

Tooth pulled near me
Graphic Representation of Tooth Extractions

The cost of a simple tooth extraction can range anywhere from $175 to $450.  If the tooth is broken at the gum line, it will be considered a ‘surgical extraction’ and usually costs $350 to $500.  Extracting a wisdom tooth, which we do in-house or refer out to an oral surgeon, can cost anywhere between $350 and $550, but if it’s a partially or completely impacted wisdom tooth then the cost could climb as high as $650.

The cost variation differ, for example, if the tooth disintegrates, it can take the dentist a while to get all of it out and the dentist has to take additional x-rays if that happens.  Each tooth is as unique as each patient.  It can be cookie cutter, but it doesn’t have to be.  The bottom line is the harder the tooth is to get out, the more it costs, hence the range.

The above fees often include a follow-up office visit to check healing or to remove sutures.  What should also be included is the understanding that a tooth is firmly encased in a bony socket and attached by a ligament.  The socket needs to be gently widened to allow the tooth to be removed; patients will feel pressure but not pain during this procedure. Sometimes a tooth is so firmly anchored that is has to be removed in sections.

Additional related fees, may be a bone graft ($500.00) to prepare the site for a dental implant 4 to 6 months down the line.  Many dental insurance plans cover 70 percent to 80 percent of tooth extraction costs if the procedure is considered to be medically necessary and not done just for cosmetic reasons.

Typically, dental insurance permits only about $1,000 per year coverage so if there are other teeth needing to be extracted then the cost can escalate above the annual limit.  Because of the limited coverage that dental insurance provides, most people have come to realize that they don’t have much protection from the high cost of dental care with dental insurance alone, so we try and work out a plan to help our patients.

Our goal is to help you understand a procedure which may vary depending on the circumstances surrounding the tooth being pulled.  If you have additional questions or concerns, do not hesitate to contact our office or email us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Scheinfeld Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Sandy Springs Dentist: Oral Hygiene and Covid-19 in the Elderly

Sandy Springs Dentist near meThe oral cavity has long been considered a potential reservoir for respiratory pathogens. With the Covid-19 pandemic, there has been a renewed interest in the relation between oral flora and respiratory infection among “at-risk” patients such as patients from intensive care units or frail older adults. This has been especially born out in what happened in New York after Governor Cuomo ordered Covid patients to be placed in nursing homes.

The mechanisms of infection, particularly in assisted living and nursing homes could be colonization of the oral biofilm by respiratory pathogens followed by aspiration.[1] More recent hypotheses relate to the presence in saliva of enzymes and cytokines associated with oral pathogens, and that could modulate the colonization of the respiratory tract or promote infection by respiratory pathogens.  New research suggests bacteria from gum disease travel through airways and into the lungs. And this may lead to potentially life-threatening respiratory illnesses such as Covid-19.[2]

British researchers have found a link between poor oral hygiene and severity of COVID-19 disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. One of the major issues for our elderly is there limited access to proper oral healthcare.  The study from researchers Victoria Sampson, from the dental practice 38 Devonshire Street, London, Nawar Kamona from the Centre for Nutrition Education & Lifestyle Management (CNELM), London and Ariane Sampson from Orthodontics, Cambridge University Hospital Trust, United Kingdom collaborated to find the connection between the severity of the infection and poor oral hygiene.[3]

In elderly patients living in chronic care facilities, the colonization of dental plaque by pulmonary pathogens is frequent, if not the norm. This overreaction may explain the association between periodontal disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. While these studies are in their infancy,  good oral hygiene has been recognized as a means to prevent airway infections in patients, especially in those over the age of 70.[4]

These findings underline the necessity for improving oral hygiene among patients who are at risk and those living in long-term care institutions. Maintaining periodontal health may contribute to a healthy respiratory system, according to research published in the Journal of Periodontology.

The best way to prevent excessive harmful bacteria in the mouth of elderly patients being housed in assisted living facilities is to provide patients with the good oral hygiene. Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste, floss once a day and follow through with their semiannual dental visit.

This article is intended to promote understanding of and knowledge about general oral health topics in our ‘high risk’ elderly community. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your dentist or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment. If we can be of help, please contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

Howard Abrahams, DDS

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

770-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com


[1] Oral Health and Respiratory Infection • Philippe Mojon, DMD, PhD, 2002

[2] American Academy of Periodontology, 2008

[3] British Dental Journal

[4] Sampson, V., Kamona, N. & Sampson, A. Could there be a link between oral hygiene and the severity of SARS-CoV-2 infections?. Br Dent J 228, 971–975 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41415-020-1747-8https://www.nature.com/articles/s41415-020-1747-8

Sandy Springs Dentist: No Symptoms???

Top Sandy Springs dentist near meJust because you are experiencing no symptoms doesn’t mean that everything is perfect. Experiencing No Symptoms is one of the reasons why people don’t visit their dentist.

We recommend our patients visit us for a check-up at least every six months.  Unfortunately, this doesn’t always happen in most practices.  According to a statistic done by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 2016, only 64.4% of adults aged 18-64 had one dental visit for that year.

Dentists recommend that you go for a check-up every six months even without symptoms; there is a need to prevent small dental problems from becoming big dental problems.  Why? Two reasons, one because patients can’t do at home what can be done in an office visit and two, because small problems are easier to handle than big problems.  A dentist finding a problem that is not yet a danger is beneficial to the patient because the dentist is able to intervene before it becomes a big problem.

Not taking good care of your teeth and gums can lead to more than bad breath or a toothache. While the nature of the link isn’t always clear, oral health can say a lot about your overall well-being.  The research has linked oral health problems such as periodontal or gum disease to many health conditions, including diabetes, heart and kidney disease, asthma, osteoporosis, cancer and now Alzheimer’s, .

Yet it’s hard to show in these studies what the relationship is because these diseases are all multifactorial.  So the watch phase is, even if you have no symptoms, it is best to keep visiting the dentist every six months. If we say that everything looks perfect than great!

If we can be of help, please feel free to give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

And

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com