Dentist Woodstock: How much do dental implants cost?

If you are trying to figure out the ins and outs of  implants verses the older more conventional methods of tooth replacement, the cost of dental implantsat first blush may appear high, and therefore, unaffordable to most people.  But appearances can be deceiving if you examine the beneficial differences and the time involved by your specialist.  While I have written on those issues before, let’s explore other aspects of price and how different dental implants may differ very significantly depending on different factors.

The real concern for the patient is ‘where and how’ to find a low cost quality dental implant, and is most likely the driven adjective ‘low cost’ a result of the perception by the patient that teeth are utilitarian to their daily life.  That’s really not the case, but to put the cost into perspective, all the while considering that your teeth aren’t really as appreciated as much as they should be, let’s examine what goes into the cost of a dental implant.

4 Factors that Drive the Cost of Dental Implants:

The Material: The traditional materials – prices of cobalt-chromium alloy and titanium are not the same.  Implants from cobalt-chromium (CC) alloy rods are cheaper than comparable titanium implants, but when it comes to zirconium dioxide, then cost of a dental implant may appear to be cost prohibitive to the patient.  But, depending on where the implant is being placed, you may end up with a less than satisfactory result with the less expensive CC implant.

The Size: This case is a significant factor.  The bigger the implant, the more material, the more it costs, but also the more it may do.  Also, special coatings applied to the surface of the implant, contribute to better osseo-integration with the bone, will affect the cost of the dental implant.

The Manufacturer: Different manufacturers put different prices on similar rods made from the same material. Some manufacturers include some kind of an extra charge in the dental implant’s price for their brand name. This is a lot more esoteric and therefore harder to explain.   It’s like trying to explain the difference between Polo and Hanes T-shirts.

Finally, it may depend on where your dentist gets his implants from.  And this factor may be a function of how motivated your provider is in providing you with the best implant material for the least amount of cost to you.  Some of that may just end up being economies of scale by your provider.  Does your provider have contacts directly with manufactures in China or Israel, where the dental implant cost can be significantly reduced, while the indirect purchase of dental implants from U.S dental suppliers may ratchet up the price?

If the price is too good to be true?

The cost of an dental implant starts from around $1,500 up to $5,000.00 .  Anything less may be an indicator that you’re getting an inferior product or one not designed for a particular location in your mouth.  (Mini-plants, which I have discussed before, are the exception to the rule.)  Short term the implant device may appear to be fully functional.  But if we look at the cost and the cost of other materials for dental implants compared to their operational life, the difference may be likened to the difference between Toyo’s and Michelin tires.  Here again you may get what you pay for and the initial cost may appear affordable, but in the  long term you are going to get a better result with respect to how it functions and how long it lasts if your provider installs Michelins.

A lot of your choice and cost may depend on the choice of your provider.   It’s not to say the more you spend the better you will be.  Rather, a reputable practitioner, who is truly trained in the placement and restoration (and this may be two providers), may be a significant factor in what you end up with and what it costs.  Trust and reputation are the more difficult factors to define for the patient.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200

Acworth, GA 30102

770-928-7281

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Woodstock, GA: What you probably don’t know about Cosmetic Dentists

It seems to be prevalent in that most dentists these days are calling themselves cosmetic dentists, but there is no cosmetic specialty in dentistry.   And quite frankly, all dentistry is cosmetic.   I don’t know anyone who took the ‘ugly’ teeth class in dental school, because it doesn’t exist.  Regardless, the fact remains that the majority of dentists are general dentists, but call themselves ‘cosmetic dentists’.   They all have undergraduate degrees with either a BA or BS and at least four years of dental school with either a DDS or a DMD as the result.  But not one of them has a ‘cosmetic specialty’ in dentistry.   Those dentists who choose to make the claim do so by virtue of deciding to focus on cosmetics in their general practices.   The American Dental Association (ADA) only has nine recognized post dental degree dental specialties and cosmetic dentistry is not one of them.  These specialties range in one to six years of advance training beyond dental school.  At the end of their post doctorate degree, these dentists receive additional certifications in their respective specialties, thus becoming what should be considered experts within their fields of dentistry.   Some are either board eligible or board certified.  These ADA specialties are:

Dental Public Heath, Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Radiology and Surgery, Orthodontics, Endodontics, Pediatric Dentistry, Periodontics, and the least known, Prosthodontics.

Prosthodontics: (crown, bridge, and implants) A Prosthodontist has a dental specialty license pertaining to the diagnosis, treatment planning, rehabilitation and maintenance of the oral function, comfort, appearance and health of patients with clinical conditions associated with missing or deficient teeth and/or oral and maxillofacial tissues using biocompatible substitutes. Most dentists are not trained prosthodontic graduates of a dental school – rather they take short continuing education and utilize trial and error experience to be able to understand how size, shape, color and symmetry all work together to create what a prosthodontists is trained in their post graduate work.   On the other hand, the prosthodontist is trained at a university to create the smile that implements the use of veneers, crowns, bridges and the increasingly more common procedure of dental implants to ensure that the right smile is achieved, both functionally and aesthetically beautiful.  If anyone has a specialty in cosmetic dentistry, it would be the prosthodontist.  So when you are seriously looking for a cosmetic dentist, look for a prosthodontist.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC 5471 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200 Acworth, GA 30102 770-928-7281

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilewoodstock.com

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