Dunwoody’s Implant Dentist – ADA Recognized Prosthodontist

dental-implants2These days everyone’s an ‘implantologist’ without there being an implant specialty in dentistry.   While there are multiple disciplines of dentistry involved in the placement of implants, the general dentist is at the bottom end of the scale for expertise, training and experience.   Yet in order to generate extra income general dentists press the envelope of ethics by calling themselves ‘implantologists’ or implant specialists.   Granted they all have undergraduate degrees with either a BA or BS and at least four years of dental school with either a DDS or a DMD as the result and by law are allowed to place and/or restore implants, not one of them has an American Dental Association (ADA) recognized ‘implant specialty’ in dentistry.   Those dentists who choose to make the claim do so by virtue of deciding to focus on implants in their general practices.   The ADA only has nine recognized post dental degree specialties and implant dentistry is not one of them.  These specialties range in one to six years of advanced training beyond dental school.  At the end of their post doctorate dental degree, these dentists receive additional certifications in their respective specialties.   Of the ADA specialties only three truly have special post doctorate training in implants and they are:

Oral Surgeons, Periodontists, and the least known, Prosthodontists (who generally orchestrate the placement and final restoration of the implant).[1]

Prosthodontics: (derived from the word prosthesis) A Prosthodontist has a dental specialty degree pertaining to the diagnosis, treatment planning, rehabilitation and maintenance of the oral function, comfort, appearance and health of patients with clinical conditions associated with missing or deficient teeth and/or oral and maxillofacial tissues using biocompatible substitutes.   Most general dentists take short continuing education courses combined with trial and error experience to understand how size, shape, color and symmetry all work together to create what a prosthodontist is trained to do in an ADA approved university setting.   Contrary to this hit or miss approach, the prosthodontist is trained to create the smile that implements the use of veneers, crowns, bridges and the increasingly more common procedure of dental implants to ensure that the right smile is achieved, both functionally and aesthetically.  If anyone has a specialty in implant dentistry or the right to call themselves an ‘implantologist’, it would be the ADA sanctioned prosthodontist.  Of the 170 thousand dentists in the U.S., less than two (2%) percent are trained prosthodontists.  So when you are seriously looking for a cosmetic dentist to provide you with the best implant result, look for a prosthodontist.

Dr. Scheinfeld received her prosthodontics degree from Emory University School of Dentistry in 1988.  Her prosthodontics’ instructor, Dr. E. Neal Kopp practiced with her for 14 years until his death in 2008.  In addition, Dr. Sidney Tourial, an adjunct Emory Prosthodontic professor and this year’s GDA President, has been in the practice for over 20 years.  For in-house implant placement we use Dr. ZoAnna Scheinfeld, CIRP trained.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC
290 Carpenter Drive, 200A
Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328
404-256-3620
www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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[1] As of late, endodontists have started training in the area of implant placement.

Implant Dentist: Sandy Springs: Affordable Dental Implants

dental-implants2If you are trying to figure the ins and outs of implants, the cost may appear high, but appearances can be deceiving. If you examine the beneficial health differences and the time involved by your specialist  implants are always well worth the expense.  While I have written on those issues before, let’s explore the price and how dental implants vary depending on differing factors.

The real concern for the patient is ‘where and how’ to find a low cost quality dental implant. Predominantly, the driven adjective ‘low cost’ is a result of the perception by patients that teeth are utilitarian to their daily life.  Knowing that your teeth aren’t really as appreciated as much as they should be, let’s examine what goes into the cost of a dental implant.

4 Factors that Drive the Cost of Dental Implants:

The Material:

The traditional materials of cobalt-chromium alloy and titanium are not the same.  Implants from cobalt-chromium (CC) alloy rods are cheaper than comparable titanium implants, but when it comes to zirconium dioxide, then cost of a dental implant may appear to be cost prohibitive to the patient.  But, depending on where the implant is being placed, you may end up with a less than satisfactory result with the less expensive CC implant.

The Size:

This case is a significant factor.  The bigger the implant, the more material, the more it costs, but also the more it may do.  Also, special coatings applied to the surface of the implant, contribute to better osseo-integration with the bone, will affect the cost of the dental implant.

The Manufacturer:

Different manufacturers put different prices on similar rods made from the same material. Some manufacturers include some kind of an extra charge in the dental implant’s price for their brand name. Then there are cheaper knock-offs with higher failure rates and no warranties.  As a patient you will never know the difference until it’s too late.

Finally, it’s the dentist.  If your dentist is willing to sacrifice long term quality for short term profits you are going to get an inferior restoration and ultimately you will pay the price over the long run.  Finding a true health care provider requires diligence on your part.  You have to do the research as to the reputation of your provider.

If the price is too good to be true?

The cost of an dental implant starts from around $1,500 up to $5,000.00.  Anything less may be an indicator that you’re getting an inferior product or one not designed for a particular location in your mouth.  Short term the implant device may appear to be fully functional.  But if we look at the cost and the cost of other materials for dental implants compared to their operational life, the difference may be likened to the difference between Toyo’s and Michelin tires.  Here again you may get what you pay for and the initial cost may appear affordable, but in the  long term you are going to get a better result with respect to how it functions and how long it lasts if your provider installs Michelins.

It’s not to say the more you spend the better you will be.  Rather, a reputable practitioner, who is truly trained in the placement and restoration (and this may be two providers), may be a significant factor in what you end up with and what it costs.  Trust and reputation are the more difficult factors to define for the patient.

If we can be of service or answer any of your concerns please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Dunwoody: Small Steps to a Healthy Mouth.

ToothbrushHey, I know you have heard some or maybe all of this before, but it works.  It’s not brain surgery nor is it boot camp.  But if you will follow these small steps you can save yourself a lot of money and sometimes a lot of pain.

1. Brush your teeth at least twice each day with fluoride toothpaste.

Aim for first thing in the morning and before going to bed. At least once a day, use floss or an interdental cleaner to remove food your toothbrush missed. Make sure you:

•Drink water that contains added fluoride if you can. Fluoride protects against dental decay. Most public water systems in the United States have added fluoride. Check with your community’s water or health department to find out if there is fluoride in your water. You also may want to use a fluoride mouth rinse, along with brushing and flossing, to help prevent tooth decay.

•Gently brush all sides of your teeth with a soft-bristled brush. Round and short back-and-forth strokes work best.

•Take time to brush along the gum line, and lightly brush your tongue to help remove plaque and food.

•Ask your dentist or dental hygienist to show you the best way to floss your teeth.

•Change your toothbrush every three months, or earlier if the toothbrush looks worn or the bristles spread out. A new toothbrush removes more plaque.

•If you wear dentures, be sure to remove them at night and clean them before putting them back in the next morning.

2. Have a healthy lifestyle.

•Eat healthy meals. Cut down on tooth decay by brushing after meals. Avoid snacking on sugary or starchy foods between meals.

•Don’t smoke. It raises your risk of gum disease, oral and throat cancers, and oral fungal infections. It also affects the color of your teeth and the smell of your breath.

•Limit alcohol use to one drink per day for women. Heavy alcohol use raises your risk of oral and throat cancers. Using alcohol and tobacco together raises your risk of oral cancers more than using one alone.

•Limit how much soda you drink. Even diet soda contains acids that can erode tooth enamel.

3. Get regular checkups.

•Have an oral exam once or twice a year. Your dentist may recommend more or fewer visits depending on your oral health. At most routine visits, the dentist and a dental hygienist will treat you. During regular checkups, dentists look for signs of diseases, infections, problems, injuries, and oral cancer.

•See your dentist right away if:

◦Your gums bleed often

◦You see any red or white patches on the gums, tongue, or floor of the mouth

◦You have mouth or jaw pain that won’t go away

◦You have sores that do not heal within two weeks

◦You have problems swallowing or chewing

4. Follow your dentist’s advice.

Your dentist may suggest ways to keep your mouth healthy. He or she can teach you how to properly floss or brush. Follow any recommended steps or treatments to keep your mouth healthy.

5. If you have another health problem, think about how it may affect your oral health.

For instance, if you take medicines that give you a dry mouth ask your doctor or nurse if there are other drugs you can use. Have an oral exam before starting cancer treatment. And if you have diabetes, practice good oral hygiene to prevent gum disease.

If we can be of assistance or you have additional concerns, feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Dunwoody: What Discolors Teeth?

Porcelain VeneersTooth discoloration and staining can cause embarrassment and self-consciousness.  There are many causes of tooth discoloration, some within your control and some not.  Here is a short list of some causes and possible cures:

1.   Drinks: Coffee and tea tend to stain teeth, especially when sipped over a prolonged period of time.  Periodic professional cleanings and in-office tooth whitening will reverse these effects.

2.  Smoking/Tobacco:  Smoking and chewing tobacco have a negative effect on tooth color, gingival health, and breath.  The best treatment is to quit smoking.  Again, periodic in-office cleanings and professional tooth whitening can minimize the discoloring effects of smoking.

3.  Dental Restorations: Metal restorations tend to breakdown at the edges (margins) and may reduce the transparency of tooth enamel.  For a nice aesthetic appearance, replacing metal fillings with tooth colored composites or porcelains reverses these effects.  Even tooth-colored restorations are subject to stains with time and may need replacement.

4.   Age: As we get older there is a cumulative effect of tooth staining.  The outer tooth enamel wears down with time, causing teeth to turn yellow.  Porcelain veneers or dental bonding can replace the worn layer and restore that once lost youthful smile.  In some cases, tooth whitening may be an appropriate solution.

5.  Chemicals and Medications:  During the tooth development of a child, certain antibiotics such as tetracycline or excessive ingestion of fluoride can cause permanent tooth staining.  Though these stains cannot be cleaned or whitened, porcelain veneers or composite bonding can give the stained teeth a new look.

In addition to the causes listed above, trauma and genetics play a role in changing tooth color. Keep your teeth whiter and brighter by regular dental cleanings (which usually include stain removal and polishing) and ask us about our cosmetic options to get that right smile.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200B

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

Thank you for all your referrals.  We truly appreciate them.

Information included is not dental or medical advice.  For your specific information

 be sure to consult your dentist.

 

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Dentist Roswell: Dental Implants 101

dental-implants2Dental Implants have changed the face of dentistry.  What used to be a difficult procedure is now the standard of care. As with most treatment procedures today, dental implants not only involve scientific discovery, research and understanding, but also application in a practical sense.[1]  The practice of implant dentistry requires expertise in planning, surgery and tooth restoration.  The role of a prosthodontist as the ‘quarterback’ in the process is as much about their art and experience as it is about their post graduate training.

The dental implant is actually a replacement for the root or roots of a missing tooth. And like tooth roots, dental implants are secured in the jawbone in a process known as osseo-integration.  Hidden beneath the gum-line, they are used to secure crowns (the parts of teeth seen in the mouth), bridgework or dentures by a various design means. They are made of titanium, which is lightweight and strong, but most importantly, they are biocompatible, which means that it is not rejected by the body.[2]

Titanium’s special property of fusing to bone is the biological basis of dental implant success.  Placing dental implants stabilizes the existing jawbone.  Along with replacing lost teeth, implants help maintain the jawbone’s shape and density, ensuring your facial skeleton is also maintained. This means they also support indirectly, the soft tissue structures — gum tissues, cheeks and lips. Dental implants help you eat, chew, smile, talk and look completely natural, transitioning the patient to a well maintained physical appearance.[3]

So the final question is ‘are you a candidate for dental implants’?  If we can be of service please do not hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Thank you for all your referrals.  We truly appreciate them.

Information included is not dental or medical advice.  For your specific information

 be sure to consult your dentist.


[1] International Congress of Oral Implantologists – http://www.dentalimplants.com/

[2] Ibid

[3] Ibid

Dunwoody Cosmetic Dentist

mature-woman-smilingIt seems to be prevalent in that most dentists these days are calling themselves ‘cosmetic dentists’, where in reality there is no cosmetic specialty in dentistry.   If the truth be known, all dentistry is cosmetic.  It’s just some are trained to do it better than others.  I don’t know anyone who took the ‘ugly’ teeth class in dental school, because obviously, tongue in cheek, it doesn’t exist.  Regardless, the fact remains that the majority of dentists are general dentists and call themselves self-ordained ‘cosmetic dentists’.   They all have undergraduate degrees with either a BA or BS and at least four years of dental school with either a DDS or a DMD.  But not one of them has a ‘cosmetic specialty’ in dentistry.   Those dentists who choose to make the claim do so by virtue of deciding to focus on cosmetics in their general practices.

The American Dental Association (ADA) recognizes only nine post dental degree dental specialties and cosmetic dentistry is not one of them.  The closest post doctorate degree to a ‘cosmetic dentist’ specialty is prosthodontics.

Prosthodontics: (crown, bridge, and implants) A Prosthodontist has a dental specialty license pertaining to the diagnosis, treatment planning, rehabilitation and maintenance of the oral function, comfort, appearance and health of patients with clinical conditions associated with missing or deficient teeth and/or oral and maxillofacial tissues using biocompatible substitutes.

Of the 170,000 dentists in the U.S. only 3,200 are trained prosthodontists.  The so called ‘cosmetic dentists’ take short continuing education courses together with trial and error to create what a prosthodontist is trained to do in their ADA sanctioned post graduate work.   The prosthodontist is trained for 2 years at a university to create the smile that implements the use of veneers, crowns, bridges and now the standard of care procedure of dental implants to ensure that the right smile is achieved both functionally and aesthetically.  If anyone has a specialty in cosmetic dentistry, it would be the prosthodontist.  So when you are seriously looking for a cosmetic dentist, look for a prosthodontist.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC
290 Carpenter Drive, 200A
Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328
404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

 

Thank you for all your referrals.  We truly appreciate them.

Information included is not dental or medical advice.  For your specific information

 be sure to consult your dentist.

 

Related articles