Dentist Buckhead: Women and Oral Health

mature womanAs a woman, you know that your health needs are unique, including your oral health needs. And because your needs are unique, you need to take extra care of yourself.  While women tend to take better care of their oral health than men do, women’s oral health is not significantly better than men’s.  This is because hormonal fluctuations throughout a woman’s life can affect many tissues, including gum tissue.  These fluctuations occur when you mature and change, as you do during puberty or menopause, or other times when you have special health needs, such as menstruation and particularly during pregnancy.

According to the Journal of Periodontology[1] at least 23 percent of women between the ages 30 to 54 have periodontitis.[2]  And, 44 percent of women ages 55 to 90 who still have their teeth have periodontitis.  Yet many women do not realize they have it until it reaches an advanced state, which is why regular hygiene check-ups are so important.

Stages of your life – steps to protect your oral health.

Puberty – an increased level of sex hormones, such as progesterone and possibly estrogen, causes increased blood circulation to the gums. This may cause an increase in the gum’s sensitivity and lead to a greater reaction to any irritation, including food particles and plaque. Signs to look for in your teenage daughter are swollen, red and/or tender gums.[3]

It is particularly important during this time in your daughter’s life to make sure she follows a good at-home oral hygiene regimen, including regular brushing and flossing, and regular dental care. In some cases, a dental professional may recommend periodontal therapy to help prevent damage to the tissues and bone surrounding the teeth.[4]

Menstruation – can result in menstruation gingivitis.  Women with this condition may experience bleeding gums, bright red and swollen gums and sores on the inside of the cheek. Menstruation gingivitis typically occurs right before a woman’s period and clears up once her period has started.  Sometimes it occurs concurrent with stressful situations and menstruation.

Pregnancy – increase gingivitis or pregnancy gingivitis beginning in the second or third month of pregnancy that increases in severity throughout the eighth month. During this time, some women may notice swelling, bleeding, redness or tenderness in the gum tissue.[5] As a result of varying hormone levels, between 50%-70% of women will develop gingivitis sometime during their pregnancy – a condition called pregnancy gingivitis.[6] In some cases, gums swollen by pregnancy gingivitis can react strongly to irritants and form large lumps. These growths, called pregnancy tumors, are not cancerous and generally painless.

Studies have shown a possible relationship between periodontal disease and pre-term, low-birth-weight babies. Any infection, including periodontal infection, is cause for concern during pregnancy. In fact, pregnant women who have periodontal disease may be more likely to have a baby that is born too early and too small!

To prevent pregnancy gingivitis it’s especially important to practice good oral hygiene habits, which include brushing at least twice a day, flossing once a day, and using an antimicrobial mouth rinse. If you are due for a professional cleaning, don’t skip it simply because you are pregnant.  Now more than ever, professional dental cleanings are particularly important.

Oral contraceptives – while women are taking drugs to help treat periodontal disease, such as antibiotics, may lessen the effect of an oral contraceptive.  So be sure and consult your dentist about all the medications you are taking.

Menopause and Post-Menopause – not surprising given all the changes happening within your body, but you may experience changes in your mouth as well.  You may notice discomfort such as dry mouth, pain and burning sensations in the gum tissue and altered taste, particularly to salt and pepper.

In addition, menopausal gingivostomatitis affects a small percentage of women. Gums that look dry or shiny or bleed easily and range from abnormally pale to deep red may indicate this condition. Most women find that estrogen supplements help to relieve these symptoms.[7]

Bone loss is potentially associated with both periodontal disease and osteoporosis. Women considering Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) to help fight osteoporosis should note that this may help protect their teeth and your jawbone as well as other parts of the body.

What Should You Do?

See a dental professional for cleaning at least twice a year – you need to monitor your oral health.

If referred, see a periodontist in your area. Problems may include: Bleeding gums during brushing, red, swollen or tender gums.   Other issues such as persistent bad breath or pus between the teeth and gums.  If you’re a denture wearer a change in the fit of your dentures may occur.

Keep your dentist informed about any medications you are taking and any changes in your health history.

Brush and floss properly every day.  Review your techniques with a dental professional.

If there any questions that you might have, please call us to discuss them.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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[1] January 1999 issue of the Journal of Periodontology

[2] Periodontitis is an advanced state of periodontal disease in which there is active destruction of the periodontal supporting tissues.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] WebMd. Pregnancy Gingivitis and Pregnancy Tumors.

[7] Women and Gums: American Academy of Periodontology Journal. http://www.perio.org/consumer/women.htm.

Dentist Sandy Springs: Who Moved My Cheese?

cheeseOr ‘ate my cheese’, because dairy products may be good for your oral health.  A new study suggests that consuming cheese products may help protect your teeth against cavities.  So not only do you get strong bones, you get healthy teeth.[1]

The study sampled 68 patients ranging in age from 12 to 15 and found a higher pH level in those that consumed cheese, which may have induced a higher saliva level from the chewing, suggesting that cheese has anti-cavity properties.  Additionally, various compounds found in cheese may adhere to tooth enamel and further help teeth from acid (found in wine for instance).

If we can be of help or answer your questions, please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

 


[1] General Dentistry, Journal of Academy of General Dentistry, May/June 2013.

Dentist Alpharetta: Crohn’s Disease

CrohnsStem cells found in gum tissue may fight inflammatory disease, which would be great news for IBD patients.[1]  Apparently, they have a much less inflammatory reaction and heal much faster when compared to skin stem cells.  When stem cells from the gum tissue were transplanted into mice with dextrate sulfate sodium-induced colitis — an inflamed condition of the colon — the inflammation was significantly reduced.[2]  These stem cells have the ability to develop into different types of cells as well as affect the immune system, which poses wonderful hope for patients with Crohn’s disease.

In the meantime, research on the relationship between IBD and stem cells is still ongoing.  If we can be of assistance, give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

 


[1] University of Southern California (2013, August 5). Stem cells found in gum tissue can fight inflammatory disease. ScienceDaily. Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC study in the Journal of Dental Research.

[2] Ibid.

Dentist Alpharetta: We need more BIGGEST LOSERS!!

Overweight woman buttoning up her jeans. Image shot 2010. Exact date unknown.Think twice before taking that next bite.  Because we know that being overweight can affect many aspects of a person’s health.  Now researchers suspect a link exists between obesity and gum disease.  Whether one condition is a risk factor for another or whether one disease directly causes another has yet to be discovered.[1]

What we do know is half of the U.S. population age 30 and older is affected by gum disease — a chronic inflammatory infection that impacts the surrounding and supporting structures of the teeth.[2] Gum disease itself produces its own set of cytokines, which further increases the level of these inflammatory proteins in the body’s bloodstream, helping to set off a chain reaction of other inflammatory diseases throughout the body.[3]  So it is important to visit a dentist at least twice a year so he or she can evaluate your risks for developing gum disease and offer preventive strategies.

Impacting approximately one-third of the U.S. population, obesity has become a significant health concern for Americans.  As a part of your strategy to stay healthy, a dentist can design a personalized program of home oral care to meet your specific needs.  In the meantime, research on the relationship between obesity and gum disease is still ongoing.

If we can be of assistance, give us a call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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[1] January/February 2013 issue of General Dentistry, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), it also may be a risk factor for gum disease.

[3] Ibid.

Dentist Sandy Springs: Mouthwash lowers LDL Cholesterol

Iclean
Studies indicate this will lower LDL levels

Cleaning your mouth and cleaning your arteries could be as simple as a once-a-day oral rinse according to Biomedical Development Corporation.[1]  The study was designed to see if there were improvements in oral health, which there were, but the study also produced lower LDL cholesterol levels.  The trial studies are being conducted by the Center for Oral Health Research at the University of Kentucky.

The active ingredient is a proprietary formula based on iodine.  About 40 percent of the world’s population is thought to be at risk of iodine deficiency.  Recent clinical studies shows what appears to be a closer link between oral health and cardiovascular health.  Although scientists cannot yet fully explain how the two are connected, there is ample statistical evidence to suggest that gum disease and heart disease are closely related.

Phyllis Siegel, CEO of BDC, said that while results of its ongoing clinical trials are pending, a specific formulation of the product called iCLEAN®, designed for general mouth cleaning, will soon be available.[2]

If we can be of service or provide you with more information please do not hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

The Right Smile Center

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta, GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

[1] Biomedical Development Corporation (BDC) on April 23, 2013, will present data to the American Academy of Oral Medicine showing that its oral rinse was safe and effective at fighting gingivitis in a recent clinical trial. But the most surprising finding of the study was that users of the oral rinse showed lower LDL cholesterol levels than the placebo group.

[2] http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/259391.php

Related Articles:

https://therightsmile.wordpress.com/2011/04/10/dental-sandy-springs-april-is-oral-cancer-awareness-month/

http://therightsmilecenter.blogspot.com/2013/07/oral-cancer-screening.html

https://therightsmile.wordpress.com/2014/03/21/50-shades-of-grey-teeth-whitening-dentist-sandy-springs/

 

Dentist Sandy Springs: The Right Care Keeps Patients Coming Back

mature woman
A beautiful smile creates a youthful makeover.

Restorative dentistry is an excellent tool for repairing smiles, improving oral health, and boosting one’s confidence.   Today, with so many options for restoring function and aesthetic appeal, there’s still no substitute for the proper general dental care  needed.

That’s why the Right Smile Centers offers state-of-the-art preventive dentistry, so you can keep your natural smile for years to come.  Preventive care isn’t just about what we can do you.  We emphasize our partnership in your oral healthcare.  So, it’s also about what you can do to help yourself!

Attention to Detail from Your Very First Visit.  We don’t push product and we definitely don’t try to sell you dentistry.  Our job is to educate you on your needs and what you can do to maintain the best oral care possible.

Scheduling an appointment with a new dentist can be scary, but it doesn’t have to be. Knowing what to expect can go a long way towards putting your mind at ease.   When you come to our office for your first visit, Dr. Scheinfeld and her team will perform a comprehensive oral exam to check for signs of gum disease, oral cancer, and provide you with a tooth-by-tooth inspection. We’ll talk with you about your medical history and also take X-rays to get a more detailed idea of your overall oral health.  We’ll even perform your first cleaning if we don’t find a problem and time allows.

In your first visit we would like to get to know you, because we care about your concerns as much as your smile.

Educating Patients and Preserving Smiles                              

At the Right Smile Center, we’ll offer tips for improving your oral health.  Seeing us every six months is important, but so is knowing how much time to spend at the sink maintaining your oral health.

Your Partner in Oral Health

We’ll do everything we can to help you keep your smile healthy and disease free. You know what they say about an ounce of prevention!  With the use of sealants and fluoride supplements, we can give you extra protection where you need it most.

If you live in Sandy Springs, or one of our surrounding areas call our office today to schedule your first visit.  We offer a full range of dental services, but educating our patients and helping them preserve their natural smiles for years to come is one of our highest priorities.  See what 475 unedited reviews have to say about the Right Smile Center at:

 http://www.rightsmilecenter.com/reviews.html

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

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Dentist Alpharetta: Dental X-rays, necessary or not?

under-the-hoodA lot of patients are worried that dental x-rays can cause cancer, but if you’re outside for an hour or fly on a plane, you’re exposed to more radiation than you’d get from a full set of dental x-rays.  Incidental exposure is further reduced by the use of a lead apron, sometimes with a lead thyroid collar.  What I worry about is that if we don’t take an x-ray, we might miss something serious. Dentists use x-rays to find hidden dental structures, malignant or benign masses, bone loss, and/or cavities.

It is the required standard of care.  It is possible for both tooth decay and periodontal disease to be missed during a visual clinical exam, and an x-ray evaluation of your dental and periodontal tissues is a critical part of your comprehensive oral examination.  A competent dentist cannot ethically prescribe treatment without taking an x-ray of your mouth.

Dental X-ray tools and techniques are designed to limit the body’s exposure to radiation and every precaution is taken to ensure that radiation exposure is As Low As Reasonable Achievable (the ALARA principle).  The newer dental X-ray technique be used in our Sandy Springs office is called digital imaging, where the images are sent directly to a computer and can be viewed on screen, stored, or printed out.  There are several benefits of using this new technology including:

  • less radiation than the typical X-ray
  • there is no wait time for the X-rays to develop — the images are available on screen a few seconds after being taken.
  • the image taken can be enhanced and enlarged many times its actual size on the computer screen, making it easier to show you the problem.
  • images can be electronically sent to another dentist or specialist.
  • certain software can help dentists digitally compare current images to previous ones.  Using this technique, everything that is the same between two images is “subtracted out” from the image leaving a clear image of only the portion that is different.  This helps easily see the tiniest changes that may not have been noticed by the naked eye.

According to guidelines written by the ADA and the FDA, your dentist should evaluate each patient individually.   Some patients with a lot of problems or who are at high risk for cavities may need frequent X-rays. While patients who are not having problems, the need is less frequent.   The question we apply is ‘what’s necessary’?  Because an X-ray allows your dentist to look under the hood – see bones, tissue, and hidden surfaces of your teeth that he or she can’t see with the naked eye.

If we can be of assistance, do not hesitate to contact us for a complimentary consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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