Dentist serving Dunwoody: Mouthwash and Oral Cancer

Dunwoody Dentist near meThere appears to be controversy with respect to whether or not mouthwash containing alcohol may be related to oral cancer.  This controversy arises out the studies that show a link between oral cancer and those that drink alcohol.

Michael Douglas is the most recent case in point.  He has been reported to be a heavy smoker and imbibe alcohol on what is rumored to be on frequent occasions.  The obvious link in theory is that most mouthwash formulas contain alcohol, so the conclusion is that a link to mouthwash must exist here also.  The problem is there are no conclusive studies and at this time there appears to be insufficient evidence to alter the ADA’s approval of mouthwash containing alcohol as an effective method for the prevention and reduction of gingivitis and plaque above the gumline when used as directed.  The ADA Council on Scientific Affairs awarded the ADA Seal of Acceptance to these products after a thorough review of data on their safety and effectiveness.

Of all the studies published on this topic, beginning in 1979, four studies reported some positive results while five found no association. (citations omitted)  What we know is that none of the criteria for causality have been fulfilled by the studies that have been published so far.  The International Agency for Research on Cancer, an extension of the World Health Organization, now identifies the consumption of ethanol in alcoholic beverages as a carcinogenic risk.[1]

Alcohol abuse is associated with cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx and esophagus. Ibid.  However, the reason for this association is not fully understood – it may be due to a direct effect of alcohol on these tissue.[2]  Because of the conflicting studies and endorsements I could advise you to keep using alcohol formulated mouth rinses.  But if you are concerned and wish to stay on the safe side of the debate, there are non-alcohol based mouth rinses available that appear to be effective in the prevention of gingivitis and plaque.

Our job is to try and educate you on the contemporary issues we face in addressing your oral health and if there are any questions you would like to pose, please feel free to contact us for a free consultation.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles


[1] International Agency for Research on Cancer. IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Volume 96. Alcoholic beverage consumption and ethyl carbamate (urethane). Lyon, France: 6-13 February 2007.

[2] Lachenmeier DW. Safety evaluation of topical applications of ethanol on the skin and inside the oral cavity. J Occup Med Toxicol 2008;3:26.

Green Teeth

St. Patricks Day at Chamblee DentistBecause St. Patrick’s Day is so popular in Ireland, and all you really ever hear about on the date is “Irish this, Irish that”, most assume that St. Patrick was Irish. However, the assumption would be wrong.

St. Patrick was actually Scottish and was said to be either born in Scotland or Wales. Even more interesting is that his name wasn’t even Patrick. His birth name is actually Maewyn Succat.  The story goes, at the age of 16, he was kidnapped and sold into Irish slavery.  Later on in time he became a priest under bishop of Auxerre and took on the name Patricius, better known as Patrick. Over time he began to believe it was his calling to bring Christianity and Ireland closer together. Regardless of where he was born, he became an integral part of Irish culture through service to his adopted country and thus became the patron saint of Ireland.  Perhaps the Scottish should get a little recognition on this day as well.

As history would have it, March 17th has developed into a worldwide celebration of Irish culture and history, and just a darn good excuse to drink green beer.  Now’s the time to plan your St. Patrick’s Day festivities! In North America, parades are often held on the Sunday before the 17th.  Over the weekend Chicago should have died it’s river green for a few hours to celebrate.  Our own Savannah used to do the same thing.  So if you can’t make it to Savannah, head to your favorite pub for a pint with friends or invite people over for some Irish-inspired appetizers. If you have nowhere else to go, or your teeth are stained green, visit us, we’d love to see you (and bring back your natural smile).  Have a happy St. Patrick’s Day.

Oh, and the shamrock thing, legend has it that St. Patrick used it to explain the Trinity.  Isn’t it amazing how legends evolve.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Serving Dunwoody – 4 Steps to Promoting Good Oral Health

Dunwoody Dentist near me

Good oral hygiene is important for maintaining one’s overall health.  If you believe this and you should, then there are 4 essential, yet simple guidelines of preventative care to maintaining good oral health, all of which are endorsed by the American Dental Association:

  1. Floss regularly and floss first- It is recommended that individuals floss on a regular basis after meals and before brushing their teeth.  The reason to floss first is to dislodge any food particles trapped in between your teeth, which can be disposed of while brushing.  The proper way to floss is to push the floss gently between your teeth to the gum to loosen debris your toothbrush cannot reach. Initially, you may experience some light bleeding but this should disappear once your gums get used to the flossing process.
  2. Brushing your teeth-  If you don’t have an electric toothbrush, good brushing by hand should
    take a minimum of 2 minutes and should involve brushing in a circular motion, which the electric toothbrush does for you.  You work your way from one side of the mouth to the other, keeping in
    mind to pay attention to certain neglected areas such as the very back teeth and your tongue. Dentists recommend using soft bristle brushes and toothpaste that contain fluoride.  The fluoride is important, because the rise in the consumption of bottled water has led to the population’s decline in fluoride intake.
  3. Mouthwash- I am not sure how effective this is, but if you’re not going to brush twice a day, using a mouthwash that contains fluoride at least twice a day is a good preventative measure that kills the bacteria responsible for cavities and gum disease.
  4. Your Dental visits- Maintaining your oral health requires regular dental visits at least every six months.  You need to do this for early detection of potential problems that could develop into more serious problems and the hygienist can clean areas that might have been missed or that were resistant to the 3 steps above.

Finally, Finding a Dentist that is Right for You

Your dental care is an important aspect of your general health care.  So you need to make sure you find a dentist that is right for you. This can be a difficult process.  Look for someone who’s competent and you feel comfortable with, one you can have a collaborative relationship with. This is important because there are conditions and problems that were not discussed in this article that the dentist will need to pay attention to during your regular checkups.  Hopefully after reading this article, you will have a better understanding of the basics for good oral health.   I you have questions or concerns feel free to
contact or call.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Sandy Springs: Afraid of the dentist?

What can I do to make my visit better?

Sandy Springs dentist near meMany people get nervous at the thought of visiting the dentist. Quite frankly, I used to be that way also, which is why I have some insight into what you might be going through.  But don’t let your nerves stop you from having regular appointments, though.  We have many patients who have had that issue to overcome.  However, waiting too long to take care of your teeth may make things worse, even at the global health level.  Here are a few tips to make your visit easier:

•Tell the dentist and dental staff that you are feeling anxious. Getting your concerns out in the open will let your dentist adapt the treatment to your needs.

•Try to choose a time for our dental visit when you’re less likely to be rushed or under pressure. For some people, that means an early-morning appointment or maybe a last patient appointment.

•If the sound of the drill bothers you, bring a portable audio player and headset so you can listen to your favorite music. During the dental visit you might try visualizing yourself someplace relaxing, like on a warm beach.  There are times where we use aroma therapy.

• Ask our dentist if there are medications he or she can give you to help you relax (this is sometimes called “sedation dentistry”).

I write this information to try and help patients.  And given recent research and the relationship of your oral health to your global health, you can’t afford to not see your dentist on a regular basis.   So if there is anything we can do, please feel free to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist serving Dunwoody: 8 Windows your overall health sees through dentistry.

Sandy Springs Dentist near me

I read this article the other day by the Mayo Clinic staff and it appears very much worth republishing.  Please read this and adjust your life accordingly.  It’s really not that difficult to lead a healthy life style and live longer lives.

Oral health: A window to your overall health

Your oral health is more important than you may realize. Get the facts about how the health of your mouth, teeth and gums may affect your general health.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Did you know that your oral health can offer clues about your overall health? Or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Understand the intimate connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.

What’s the connection between oral health and overall health?

Your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless. Normally the body’s natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and
flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, harmful bacteria can sometimes grow out of control and cause oral infections, such as tooth decay
and gum disease. In addition, dental procedures, medications, or treatments that reduce saliva flow, disrupt the normal balance of bacteria in your mouth
or breach the mouth’s normal protective barriers may make it easier for bacteria to enter your bloodstream.

What conditions may be linked to oral health?

Your oral health may affect, be affected by or contribute to various diseases and conditions, including:

  • Endocarditis. Gum disease and dental procedures that cut your gums may allow bacteria to enter your bloodstream. If you have a weak immune system or a damaged heart valve, this can cause infection in other parts of the body — such as an infection of the inner lining of the heart (endocarditis).
  • Cardiovascular disease. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke may be linked to oral bacteria, possibly due to chronic inflammation from periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Gum disease has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes reduces the body’s resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk. In addition, people who have inadequate blood sugar control may develop more-frequent and severe infections of the gums and the bone that holds teeth in place, and they may lose more teeth than do people who have good blood sugar control.
  •  HIV/AIDS. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.
  • Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — may be associated with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.
  • Alzheimer’s disease. Tooth loss before age 35 may be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Other conditions. Other conditions that may be linked to oral health include Sjogren’s syndrome — an immune system disorder — and eating disorders.

Be sure to tell your dentist if you’re taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you’ve had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition.

How can I protect my oral health?

To protect your oral health, resolve to practice good oral hygiene every day. For example:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three to four months.
  • Floss daily.
  • Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Schedule regular dental checkups.

Also, watch for signs and symptoms of oral disease and contact your dentist as soon as a problem arises. Remember, taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health.

Pasted from <http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dental/DE00001/NSECTIONGROUP=2>

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs) GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Dentist Sandy Springs: Emergency Dental Tips

Sandy Springs emergency dentist near meThere are a number of simple precautions you can take to avoid accident and injury to your teeth. One way to reduce the chances of damage to your teeth, lips, cheek and tongue is to wear a mouthguard when participating in sports or recreational activities that may pose a risk. Avoid chewing ice, popcorn kernels and hard candy, all of which can crack a tooth. Cut tape using scissors rather than your teeth.

Accidents do happen, and knowing what to do when one occurs can mean the difference between saving and losing a tooth.

Tips for Dealing with Dental Emergencies:

Bitten Lip or Tongue

 Clean the area gently with a cloth and apply cold compresses to reduce any swelling. If the bleeding doesn’t stop, go to a hospital emergency room immediately.

Broken Tooth

Rinse your mouth with warm water to clean the area. Use cold compresses on the area to keep any swelling down. Call your dentist immediately.

Cracked Tooth

Depending on the size and location of the crack, treatment may vary from bonding to root canal treatment. A severely cracked tooth may need extraction. We will determine the best treatment for you.

Tiny cracks are common and usually do not cause problems. Regular dental checkups are important. They allow us to diagnose and treat problems in the early stage. If you continue to have pain, avoid chewing on that side of your mouth and call our Atlanta, GA dental office, that’s what we are here for.

Jaw-Possibly Broken

 Apply cold compresses to control swelling. Call us and/or go to a hospital emergency department immediately.

Knocked Out Tooth

Hold the tooth by the crown and rinse off the root of the tooth in water if it’s dirty. Do not scrub it or remove any attached tissue fragments. If possible, gently insert and hold the tooth in its socket. If that isn’t possible, put the tooth in a cup of milk and call us as quickly as possible. Remember to bring the tooth with you!

Objects Caught Between Teeth

Try to gently remove the object with dental floss; avoid cutting the gums. Never use a sharp instrument to remove any object that is stuck between your teeth. If you can’t dislodge the object using dental floss, contact us.

Toothache

Rinse your mouth with warm water to clean it out. Gently use dental floss or an interdental cleaner to ensure that there is no food or other debris caught between the teeth. Never put aspirin or any other painkiller against the gums near the aching tooth because it may burn the gum tissue. If the pain persists, contact us.

Schedule dental visits for you and your family today by calling The Right Smile Center in Sandy Springs at 404-256-3620. Our dental office is conveniently located on Carpenter Drive in Sandy Springs, and we serve patients from Atlanta, Sandy Springs, Roswell, Alpharetta, Johns Creek, Buckhead, Dunwoody and surrounding communities. We welcome new patients and will be happy to answer all of your questions over the phone or in person. Our dentists and team look forward to making you, and your loved ones, smile!

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Sandy Springs: Mayor Bloomberg and Soda Drinkers

Sandy Springs Dentist and Mayor BloombergMy preference is to have government stay out of my arena even if the Mayor might be right. Dentists can usually spot a soda drinker a mile away.  These patients are often prone to dental cavities and white spots on their teeth known as decalcifications, which are actually the start of new cavities.

A cavity is an infection caused by a combination of carbohydrate-containing foods or beverages and bacteria that live in our mouths.  Sweetened soda contains a high amount of sugar, a carbohydrate that can promote cavities.  Sodas may be even more damaging to the teeth than other sugar containing beverages because they are acidic as well.

Before we drink a sugar-sweetened soda, the pH in our mouth is about 7.0, which is slightly more acidic than water. When the bacteria in our mouths are exposed to sugar, they metabolize it and produce acid. The acid causes the pH on the tooth surface to drop. At a pH of 5.2 or below, the acid begins to dissolve the hard enamel that forms the outer coating of our teeth. Over time this leads to erosion that causes cavities and painful toothaches.[1]

Of all of the sodas tested, cola caused the most decalcification. Sweetened soda seems to damage teeth in two ways. The soda has a low PH and makes the mouth acidic, and the sugar content causes tooth decay when it comes into contact with bacteria in the mouth.

The easiest way to prevent cavities is by reducing the amount and frequency of eating sugary foods and beverages.  If you can’t stop the consumption then consider brushing your teeth at least three times a day, especially after eating or drinking and before bed.

If you have to have sweetened soda, drink it through a straw in one sitting, to bypass the teeth altogether.  If we can answer any of your questions or concerns please contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com


[1] Teeth exposed to cola, orange and lime soda had significantly more decalcification than those exposed to mineral water.  Mayor Bloomberg has no restrictions on mineral water, yet.