Dentist Serving Dunwoody: Gum disease linked to infertility

 

Sandy Springs Dentist near meAccording to research at the American Academy of Periodontology conference, gum disease is linked to women who use infertility treatments.[1] The study said women undergoing infertility treatment for more than three menstrual cycles experience increased inflammation and bleeding of the gums. These women also have increased levels of gingival crevicular fluid, which contains tissue breakdown products that may be markers for the progression of gum disease.[2]

The lead author Dr. Cenk M. Haytac, from Cukurova University in Adana, Turkey, postulates that these effects occur because these agents increase body levels of estrogen and the gums apparently are a target for estrogen since they contain estrogen receptors.  Though not definitive, several studies have shown evidence that gum infections are associated with unsuccessful embryo development or the failure of in-vitro fertilization. Poor oral health is as bad for fertility as obesity – delaying conception by about two months says latest research.[3]

Experts at the annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Sweden were presented with evidence how women with gum disease took over seven months to conceive, compared to the usual five months. The researchers believe the underlying cause is inflammation. Unchecked, this can set off a chain of reactions capable of damaging the body’s normal workings.

Periodontal disease has already been linked with heart disease, type 2 diabetes and miscarriage, plus poor sperm quality in men.  An Australian study involving over 3,700 women indicated that those with gum disease had raised blood levels of markers for inflammation.[4]   Although speculative, as a precaution researchers suggest that the treatment of gum disorders might influence the outcome of infertility treatment.  According to Dr. Michael P. Rethman, president of the AAP, “[i]t is reasonable to assume that if low levels of plaque are established and maintained during the infertility treatment, gingival inflammation would not affect the success of infertility treatment,”  “[which] would require meticulous oral hygiene and routine professional cleanings, perhaps at the beginning of each menstrual cycle to ensure the presence of healthy gums.”

Professor Roger Hart advises women trying to get pregnant to get a check-up by their dentist along with other measures like stopping smoking and drinking, maintaining a healthy weight and taking folic acid supplements.  UK fertility expert Dr. Allan Pacey said, “It’s common sense advice really to make sure you are in a healthy condition [including good oral health] if you want to try for a baby.” Around 10% of the population is believed to have severe periodontal disease.[5]

So if you are trying to get pregnant and are unsure of your oral health please see our dentists in either our Sandy Springs or Chamblee offices.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1]Journal of Periodontology, June 2004

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ananya Mandal, MD. Gum Disease Linked to Infertility. (2011)

[4] Professor Roger Hart, of the University of Western Australia.

[5] Gum disease linked to infertility http://www.news-medical.net/news/20110707/Gum-disease-linked-to-infertility.aspx. Screen clipping taken: 8/30/2011 5:09 PM  Posted in: Women’s Health News

Dentist Dunwoody: Brush and Floss if you want to keep ‘em.

Dentist near meOften I am asked questions such as how often I should floss and is flossing really necessary.  I am famous for saying “You should only brush and floss the teeth you want to keep!”  Next to your semi-annual check ups, brushing and flossing your teeth are the two most important patient activities you can do to ensure good oral health.

The goal of brushing and particularly flossing is to reduce or rid your mouth of harmful bacteria that adversely affect both your gums and your teeth. Microscopic bacteria reside in your mouth calling it home for feeding off the food particles left on our teeth.

Bacteria produce acid from their feasting and  this acid eats into your tooth enamel creating cavities. Addition toxins are produced from bacteria in plaque that will inflame and irritate your gum tissue. And finally, without proper care the bacteria can also sulfur compounds that create bad breath.

In the most recent studies, poor oral health can be linked to other related health issues that may stem from oral bacteria entering the bloodstream affecting other internal organs.  Regular brushing and flossing removes the plaque and the bacteria plaque contains. Unfortunately, many people think brushing alone is sufficient to rid the mouth of these bacteria.   But flossing is a key component to your good oral hygiene program.

If you do not floss and allow plaque to remain in between teeth it eventually hardens into a substance known as tartar. Unlike plaque which can be easily removed by brushing, tartar can only be removed by your dentist.

Over time, failing to floss will result in irritated and inflamed gums. This condition is known as gingivitis, which if left untreated can progress to periodontal disease domino’ing into gingival recession, bone loss, loose teeth, and so on until ultimately your teeth are lost.

Timely and regular flossing removes the bacteria that escapes the reach of the toothbrush.  Brushing alone only does part of the job.  So you really need to floss. The American Dental Association recommends that you floss at least once a day, but I would suggest once in the morning and once in the evening as the better protocol. Contact us for your next oral exam and teeth cleaning.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Dentist Sandy Springs: Healthy Mouth

Sandy Springs Dentist near meHealthy gums are a good sign of a healthy mouth. Your mouth is made up of various tissues and your cheek, tongue and gum tissues should look pink and moist. Frequent dental examinations are the best way to maintain the oversight of these tissues. When you visit the Right Smile Centers, the first thing our dentists will do is check on the condition of your teeth and tissues, as if they were hand in glove.

Are you looking for a trustworthy dentist to maintain your oral health? Contact our Sandy Springs or Chamblee office today for all your dental and emergency dental care needs. We can help you reach and maintain the right smile.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Sandy Springs: It’s Your Mouth and Your Health

Dunwoody Dentist near meWhile usually overlooked, tooth decay, gum disease and oral cancer are chronic oral diseases. For those who don’t understand, a chronic disease is a health condition that lasts a long time and can affect people of any age. But the vast majority of chronic diseases can be prevented, and yet they are still the leading cause of poor health, including poor oral health.

The risk factors for oral diseases include poor oral hygiene, an unhealthy diet, using tobacco, tobacco-like products and drinking too much alcohol. These risk factors and others, like not getting enough physical activity and sleep apnea raise the risk of heart disease, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes.

Knowing the risk factors for chronic diseases can help you to prevent them, which is why you see us on a regular basis. Eating healthy food, brushing with fluoride toothpaste, drinking water with fluoride are only part of the process. But keeping your regular visits to the dentist and dental hygienist help to promote good global health. Call now for your oral health.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

Zoey Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

And

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Sandy Springs: Your Mouth, Your Health

Sandy Springs Dentist near meOral health is being able to smile, speak, chew, swallow, touch and express feelings and emotions without pain, discomfort and disease.

To a dentist, your mouth can tell us a lot about the health of your body. The mouth shows signs of tooth decay, gum disease and other oral health problems. It can also show signs of other disease, if you’re missing certain foods from your diet and unhealthy habits such as using tobacco, tobacco-like products and alcohol.

If properly taken care of, good oral health gives you the confidence to live, work and play. Oral health is important for well-being and quality of life; the two are related and one broadcasts about the other.

Eating healthy food, brushing with fluoride toothpaste, drinking water with fluoride, and regular visits to the dentist and dental hygienist helps to promote good global health. Call now for your oral health.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

Zoey Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

And

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Sandy Springs Dentist: Poor Dental Health May Cause Dementia

Sandy Springs Dentist near meA recent analysis led by NIA scientists suggests that bacteria that cause gum disease are also associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, especially vascular dementia. The results were reported in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. This supports a 2013 study from the University of Central Lancashire School of Medicine and Dentistry. The2013 UCLS was the first to pinpoint a specific gum disease bacteria in the brain. In 2013, Researchers looked at donated brain samples of 10 people without dementia and 10 people with dementia. They found the bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis in the brains of four of those with dementia.

Previous lab studies have suggested that this is one mechanism influencing the cascade of events that leads to dementia, but large studies with people have not been conducted until recently to confirm this relationship. The 2020 NIA Intramural Research Program team examined whether gum disease and infections with oral bacteria were linked to dementia diagnoses and deaths using restricted data linkages with Medicare records and the National Death Index. The team compared different age groups at baseline, with up to 26 years of follow-up, for more than 6,000 participants.

The analysis revealed that older adults with signs of gum disease and mouth infections at baseline were more likely to develop Alzheimer’s during the study period.[1]

The findings suggest that oral infection preceded the diagnosis of the patient’s dementia. This indicates that maintaining one’s oral hygiene may be a factor in reducing the incidence of dementia. Call now for your hygiene check up.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

And

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com


[1] https://www.nia.nih.gov/news/large-study-links-gum-disease-dementia Beydoun M, et al. Clinical and bacterial markers of periodontitis and their association with incident all-cause and Alzheimer’s disease dementia in a large national surveyJournal of Alzheimer’s Disease. 2020;75(1):157-172. doi: 10.3233/JAD-200064.

Dentist Sandy Springs: Dental Health and Your Sleep

Dentist near meYour dental health can impact your quality of sleep.  Your dental health and sleep are connected.  A 2018 Japanese study in Health examined 51 participants who were age 55 or older, and they found a direct correlation between poor oral health and poor quality of sleep. [1]

And the opposite may occur also, i.e. the quality of sleep can affect your dental health.  A 2016 study in Clinical Oral Investigations examined 42,539 people and found that individuals with self-reported sleep disorders were at an increased risk of gingival (gum) inflammation.[2] Evidently, gum inflammation can be caused by non-restorative sleep, which may cause the body to release inflammatory hormones.

Additionally, a 2017 study in Clujul Medical suggests that flossing may actually help improve sleep.[3] Chujul researchers examined 230 dental students and found that while those with poor dental health were more prone to sleep issues and fatigue, participants who flossed daily had good sleep and more energy.

These are only a few of the issues related to good oral health and your sleep.  There are more.  So give us a call to discuss your sleep issues and let us try and resolve them.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

And

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com


[1] Sato, M et al. Relationship among Health Related Quality of Life, Quality of Sleep, and Oral Health Condition. Health. Feb 2018

[2] Carra, M et al. Sleep disorders and oral health: a cross-sectional study. Clinical Oral Investigations. May 13, 2016

[3] Asawa, K et al. Influence of sleep disturbance, fatigue, vitality on oral health and academic performance in Indian dental students. Clujul Medical. Jul 15, 2017

Dentist Atlanta: Covid-19 is NO Excuse to Skip Your Dental Visits

Sandy Springs Dentist near meThe first step towards good dental health is brushing and flossing, which costs all of $3.00 to $5.00 every 3 to 5 months.  After that it is about education and knowledge. Our dental offices are well prepared to treat you during this Covid-19 pandemic.  In fact, less than 1% of dental offices nationwide have experience the Covid virus. We have been dealing with infection control for 4 decades since the outbreak of AIDS.

It’s pretty obvious that the last year of this pandemic crisis may have caused people to make some tough choices with scarce funds and the risk of infection.  And skipping dental visits may have risen to the top of the list of least likely things to do with your money or your time.  But skipping dental visits may be more costly in the long run, and not just to your oral health, but to your overall health.  Difficult times often find people delaying or avoiding trips to the dentist is something we are seeing more and more these days.

Downsized employees not only have lost medical benefits, but dental coverage as well.  And without regular visits people may not be aware of the many subtle changes that may be occurring inside their mouth because they don’t feel them or recognize them.  And without seeing these changes patients feel they can delay or skip dental visits, not realizing that it takes a trained dental professional to see small changes that if left untreated may develop into major costly dental or even medical issues.

One of the key roles of a dental hygienist is to educate patients about the etiology of dental diseases and what individuals can do to prevent oral health issues. These issues if left unchecked or untreated could affect a person’s ability to eat properly, compromising one’s ability to maintain proper nutrition, which in turn may negatively impact one’s general health.  If left untreated bleeding of the gums or inflammation, which is a slow, relatively painless process, if left untreated, can result in bone degradation and eventual tooth loss.  It may also be a sign of other global health issues such as diabetes, heart related issues or even contribute to infertility or some form of birth complication in pregnant women.

Given these possibilities the dental office is the starting point for dental education.  Education about oral health allows you to take ownership of your success in taking care of your body.  Ask questions.  Proper flossing and brushing of teeth on a daily basis, preferably twice daily, is critical to remove bacterial plaque between the teeth that, if not removed, can destroy the fibers that hold the teeth in place.

In addition to brushing and flossing, good nutrition is key to good oral health as well as your global health.  It is one integrated process.  Certain drinks like red wine, soda, and even healthy fruit juice, can erode the enamel layer of your teeth.  Learn to balance the intake of acidic and alkaline foods. Ingesting high acidic foods and drinks as well as improper tooth-brushing technique are the two main reasons for tooth sensitivity.  Learn to drink more water as a part of your diet.

In this day and age, easily accessible internet websites, such as the American Dental Association offer information on various dental topics.  Read up on subjects that relate to your situation and discuss these topics with your dental professional.  That’s what they are there for.

If Covid-19 or lack of dental insurance or sudden loss of income prevents proper professional dental care, talk to our dentists to see if some arrangements can be made to accommodate your new found circumstances. The national average for Covid infections is the dental office is less than 1%.  Don’t make the mistake that your oral health can be put off, because your oral health is linked to your global health.

If we can be of assistance, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Dunwoody Dentist: Covid-19 and Oral Dental Health

Covid-19 and oral dental healthGood oral hygiene has been recognized as a means to prevent airway infections in patients, especially in those over the age of 70”. Those with periodontal disease are at a 25 percent raised risk of heart disease, thrice the risk of getting diabetes, and 20 percent raised risk of getting high blood pressure, the researchers wrote. These are all risk factors of severe COVID-19.

British researchers have found a link between poor oral hygiene and severity of COVID-19 disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection.[1]

The authors of the study found that during lung infection, there is a risk of aspirating the oral secretions into the lungs, which could cause infection. Some of the bacteria present in the mouth that could cause such infections include “Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia”.

They explained that periodontitis or infection of the gums is one of the most prevalent causes of harmful bacteria in the mouth. These bacteria lead to the formation of cytokines such as Interleukin 1 (IL1) and Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), which can be detected in the saliva and can reach the lungs leading to infection within them. Thus, the study concluded, “inadequate oral hygiene can increase the risk of inter-bacterial exchanges between the lungs and the mouth, increasing the risk of respiratory infections and potentially post-viral bacterial complications.”

Going on a regular basis will help to keep your oral health on track as well as detect any early problems such as periodontal disease, oral cancer or cavities.  The best way to maintain good oral health is to visit your dentist on a regular basis coupled with brushing your teeth and drinking fluoridated water.

And like I always say ‘the best toothbrush is the one you use’.  So please, if we can help feel free to call us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

and

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles


[1] The study from researchers Victoria Sampson, from the dental practice 38 Devonshire Street, London, Nawar Kamona from the Centre for Nutrition Education & Lifestyle Management (CNELM), London and Ariane Sampson from Orthodontics, Cambridge University Hhospital Trust, United Kingdom collaborated to find the connection between the severity of the infection and poor oral hygiene. Their study titled, “Could there be a link between oral hygiene and the severity of SARS-CoV-2 infections?” was published in the latest issue of the journal British Dental Journal.

Our Sandy Springs Dental Office is Safe

No cases of COVID-19 traced to dental offices so far

Teeth cleaning near meDespite the potential risks, the good news is that both the World Health Organization and the CDC say there have been no confirmed cases of COVID-19 transmitted in a dental office so far. And that includes follow-up by the CDC of news reports suggesting such infections.

And yet, dentists know at least some patients continue to be worried enough to stay away, even if they’re in pain or overdue for important procedures such as gum surgery. Our office is about as safe as you can get, which is a derivative of the infection controls implemented decades ago during the HIV period in the ‘80’s. Now as then, there have been no cases of infection traced back to a dental office.

Unfortunately for us, weekly surveys by the American Dental Association of dental practices nationwide consistently find that our volume of patients has only reached 65% to 70% of pre-COVID-19 levels as of July.

Delaying checkups or care for dental pain can potentially turn a small cavity into a root canal or tooth extraction and add to treatment time, higher costs and even more pain.   And in rare cases, missing out on dental care can result in serious infections and even certain problems involving your global health.

You need to know that protecting the health of others working in the office is paramount to our entire team. Technically, it’s the dentist and staff that are at risk, because we are not sure where the patients have been and who they have been in contact with. So please understand we take an abundance of caution according to the guidelines when it comes to treating our patients and making sure our team is also safe.

Please note, that we all have important responsibilities as patients, too, to let our staff know before or on the day of the appointment if you’re feeling sick in any way. We’re all in this together — if you’re sick, stay home. But if you’re healthy don’t miss your opportunity to stay healthy by maintaining your oral health.  Contact us for you much needed care.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Bock, MS, DMD

Hanna, Orland, DMD

Howard Abrahams, DDS

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

404-256-3620

And

3781 Chamblee Dunwoody Road

Chamblee, GA 30341

770-455-6076

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com