Dentist Serving Dunwoody with Wisdom Teeth Removal

An oral surgeon or a general dentist can extract a wisdom tooth.  A good percent of the time we refer out to impacted wisdom toothone of our participating oral surgeons if the teeth are impacted.  Otherwise, the procedure can be done in our office and most of the time that is the case.

Patients with infections will be delayed in order to avoid other health related complications. Dental surgery may cause the periodontal bacteria in the mouth to enter the bloodstream and cause infections in other parts of your body.  Usually this can be cleared up by the prescription of antibiotics before and after surgery.

Wisdom teeth are usually the last teeth to erupt in your mouth and can cause crowding or food pockets which lead to undesired gum infections.  About 35% of the population never develops wisdom teeth at all.[1]  For those that do, it is often recommended that people from the ages 17 to 25[2] will need to have this extraction, but we judge each patient on a case by case basis.  If your wisdom teeth are not causing any noticeable problems, then it may be difficult to determine whether to have them removed to prevent future problems.[3]  It is quite possible that you may never have any problems.  But is also possible that they fail to erupt and cause problems like cysts, crowding or decay or hygiene issues.[4]

As a part of the procedure, the tooth and the surrounding tissue are numbed with a local anesthetic prior to having the extraction.  Some people prefer to use nitrous oxide (“laughing gas”).  In some cases, there is the use of a mild sedation, where the patient is still conscious but truly unaware of the procedure.  It is even possible that you receive general anesthesia.  If you decide to use the nitrous or sedation dentistry then you will need someone drive you home from the procedure.  The recovery time is usually 12 to 24 hours of rest, but usually no more than 48 hours.

One of the more  notable post procedure recommendations is not to use a straw to drink.  The sucking through the straw may dislodge the blood clot in the socket area and delay the healing process.

If you feel you are a candidate for wisdom teeth removal, or we can be of service, please feel free to contact us for a complimentary consultation.

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A                                                                                    

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[2]http://www.aaoms.org/wisdom_teeth.php, Wisdom Teeth, American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Retrieved 2011-26-08. “This generally occurs between the ages of 17 and 25”.

[3] The Right Smile Center doesn’t push to have them extracted, we recommend you read up on the subject at http://www.aaoms.org/wisdom_teeth.php, to help make the final decision.   Please remember that an oral surgeon is going to have a bias towards removal.

[4] Pediatric Dentistry: Infancy Through Adolescence, 4th Edition.

Dentist Sandy Springs: Women and Your Oral Health

As a woman, you know that your health needs are unique and this includes your oral health needs. And because your needs are unique, you need to take extra care of yourself.  While women tend to take better care of their oral health than men do, it’s not significantly better than men’s.  This is because hormonal fluctuations throughout a woman’s life can affect many tissues, including gum tissue.  These fluctuations occur when you mature and change, as you do during puberty or menopause, or other times when you have special health needs, such as menstruation and particularly during pregnancy.Two girls brushing their teeth

According to the Journal of Periodontology[1] at least 23 percent of women between the ages 30 to 54 have periodontitis.[2]  And, 44 percent of women ages 55 to 90 who still have their teeth have periodontitis.  Yet many women do not realize they have it until it reaches an advanced state, which is why regular hygiene check-ups are so important.

Stages of your life – steps to protect your oral health.

Puberty – an increased level of sex hormones, such as progesterone and possibly estrogen, causes increased blood circulation to the gums. This may cause an increase in the gum’s sensitivity and lead to a greater reaction to any irritation, including food particles and plaque. Signs to look for in your teenage daughter are swollen, red and/or tender gums.[3]

It is particularly important during this time in your daughter’s life to make sure she follows a good at-home oral hygiene regimen, including regular brushing and flossing, and regular dental care. In some cases, a dental professional may recommend periodontal therapy to help prevent damage to the tissues and bone surrounding the teeth.[4]

Menstruation – can result in menstruation gingivitis.  Women with this condition may experience bleeding gums, bright red and swollen gums and sores on the inside of the cheek. Menstruation gingivitis typically occurs right before a woman’s period and clears up once her period has started.  Sometimes it occurs concurrent with stressful situations and menstruation.

Pregnancy – increase gingivitis or pregnancy gingivitis beginning in the second or third month of pregnancy that increases in severity throughout the eighth month. During this time, some women may notice swelling, bleeding, redness or tenderness in the gum tissue.[5] As a result of varying hormone levels, between 50%-70% of women will develop gingivitis sometime during their pregnancy – a condition called pregnancy gingivitis.[6] In some cases, gums swollen by pregnancy gingivitis can react strongly to irritants and form large lumps. These growths, called pregnancy tumors, are not cancerous and generally painless.

Studies have shown a possible relationship between periodontal disease and pre-term, low-birth-weight babies. Any infection, including periodontal infection, is cause for concern during pregnancy. In fact, pregnant women who have periodontal disease may be more likely to have a baby that is born too early and too small!

To prevent pregnancy gingivitis it’s especially important to practice good oral hygiene habits, which include brushing at least twice a day, flossing once a day, and using an antimicrobial mouth rinse. If you are due for a professional cleaning, don’t skip it simply because you are pregnant.  Now more than ever, professional dental cleanings are particularly important.

Oral contraceptives – while women are taking drugs to help treat periodontal disease, such as antibiotics, may lessen the effect of an oral contraceptive.  So be sure and consult your dentist about all the medications you are taking.

Menopause and Post-Menopause – not surprising given all the changes happening within your body, but you may experience changes in your mouth as well.  You may notice discomfort such as dry mouth, pain and burning sensations in the gum tissue and altered taste, particularly to salt and pepper.

In addition, menopausal gingivostomatitis affects a small percentage of women. Gums that look dry or shiny or bleed easily and range from abnormally pale to deep red may indicate this condition. Most women find that estrogen supplements help to relieve these symptoms.[7]

Bone loss is potentially associated with both periodontal disease and osteoporosis. Women considering Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) to help fight osteoporosis should note that this may help protect their teeth and your jawbone as well as other parts of the body.

What Should You Do?

See a dental professional for cleaning at least twice a year – you need to monitor your oral health.

If referred, see a periodontist in your area. Problems may include: Bleeding gums during brushing, red, swollen or tender gums.   Other issues such as persistent bad breath or pus between the teeth and gums.  If you’re a denture wearer a change in the fit of your dentures may occur.

Keep your dentist informed about any medications you are taking and any changes in your health history.

Brush and floss properly every day.  Review your techniques with a dental professional.

If there any questions that you might have, please call us to discuss them.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1] January 1999 issue of the Journal of Periodontology

[2] Periodontitis is an advanced state of periodontal disease in which there is active destruction of the periodontal supporting tissues.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] WebMd. Pregnancy Gingivitis and Pregnancy Tumors.

[7] Women and Gums: American Academy of Periodontology Journal. http://www.perio.org/consumer/women.htm.

Sandy Springs Dental: How much does a filling cost?

Amalgams and Composite fillingsWhile costs vary from one area to the next and from one office to the next, the cost of typical amalgam filling ranges from approximately $75 to $175 per filling, whereas a composite resin filling ranges from $125 to $300 for a single surface restoration. Contact us for a complimentary consult.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com
http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dunwoody Dentist: Prompt Emergency Care

dental emergency, tooth acheWe are here to serve you. Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have an urgent need. We recognize that emergency situations may occur and we will do everything in our power to respond to you as quickly as possible. If an emergency arises during normal office hours, please call our Sandy Springs, GA dental office as early in the day as possible. We reserve special times for patients with emergency needs and you will be seen as quickly as possible. If an emergency arises while the office is closed, please feel free to contact your doctor or Dr. Scheinfeld by utilizing the contact numbers provided in our voice mail system.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

404-256-3620

infor@rightsmilecenter.com
http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

Sandy Springs Dentist: Professional Cleanings

Professional cleanings and oral examinationsProfessional cleanings are the key to your healthy smile. If you or a family member has not had a professional cleaning recently, please consider the importance of regular cleanings and maintenance of your dental health. Regular cleanings will keep you healthy and save your smile in the long run.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

ZoAnna Scheinfeld, MS, DMD

Hanna Orland, DMD

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com
http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Dunwoody: Dental Emergency? Physician or Dentist?

dental emergency, tooth acheIf you have ever had one, you know a toothache can be very painful.  And in some instances a toothache can be considered a dental emergency.  But there may be some symptoms of a toothache that cause you to wonder whether or you should see a physician or a dentist. Events like a knocked out tooth or other injury of the mouth can often be resolved quickly if you see an emergency dentist.

What exactly is an emergency dentist? Whether you know it or not, it most likely is your very own family dentist.  Many dentists offer emergency hours and on call services for dental emergencies.  If not, you may be able to find a clinic that specializes in emergency dentistry.  These facilities are open 24 hours a day just for emergencies. Either way, you can be assured that you can find help when you need it.

Most likely, if you visit a physician for your dental emergency, he will give you medication to help you over until you can see a dentist.  Obviously, a dentist can prescribe pain medication just like a physician.  So it may be faster and timelier as it relates to your issues if you see a dentist in the first place.  If you are in pain, you probably don’t want to waste the extra time it would take to see a physician first.  Obviously, if you have an injury that is causing your dental emergency, make sure it is not life threatening before you choose between a physician and a dentist.

If you have a toothache, abscess, root canal problems, broken or chipped tooth, knocked out tooth, swollen gums, broken dentures, decayed tooth roots, loose crowns, lost fillings, wisdom teeth problems or pain in the mouth or gums, feel free to contact an emergency dentist.  We are more than happy to assist you in evaluating these types of situations.

 

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

Dentist Buckhead: Women and Oral Health

mature womanAs a woman, you know that your health needs are unique, including your oral health needs. And because your needs are unique, you need to take extra care of yourself.  While women tend to take better care of their oral health than men do, women’s oral health is not significantly better than men’s.  This is because hormonal fluctuations throughout a woman’s life can affect many tissues, including gum tissue.  These fluctuations occur when you mature and change, as you do during puberty or menopause, or other times when you have special health needs, such as menstruation and particularly during pregnancy.

According to the Journal of Periodontology[1] at least 23 percent of women between the ages 30 to 54 have periodontitis.[2]  And, 44 percent of women ages 55 to 90 who still have their teeth have periodontitis.  Yet many women do not realize they have it until it reaches an advanced state, which is why regular hygiene check-ups are so important.

Stages of your life – steps to protect your oral health.

Puberty – an increased level of sex hormones, such as progesterone and possibly estrogen, causes increased blood circulation to the gums. This may cause an increase in the gum’s sensitivity and lead to a greater reaction to any irritation, including food particles and plaque. Signs to look for in your teenage daughter are swollen, red and/or tender gums.[3]

It is particularly important during this time in your daughter’s life to make sure she follows a good at-home oral hygiene regimen, including regular brushing and flossing, and regular dental care. In some cases, a dental professional may recommend periodontal therapy to help prevent damage to the tissues and bone surrounding the teeth.[4]

Menstruation – can result in menstruation gingivitis.  Women with this condition may experience bleeding gums, bright red and swollen gums and sores on the inside of the cheek. Menstruation gingivitis typically occurs right before a woman’s period and clears up once her period has started.  Sometimes it occurs concurrent with stressful situations and menstruation.

Pregnancy – increase gingivitis or pregnancy gingivitis beginning in the second or third month of pregnancy that increases in severity throughout the eighth month. During this time, some women may notice swelling, bleeding, redness or tenderness in the gum tissue.[5] As a result of varying hormone levels, between 50%-70% of women will develop gingivitis sometime during their pregnancy – a condition called pregnancy gingivitis.[6] In some cases, gums swollen by pregnancy gingivitis can react strongly to irritants and form large lumps. These growths, called pregnancy tumors, are not cancerous and generally painless.

Studies have shown a possible relationship between periodontal disease and pre-term, low-birth-weight babies. Any infection, including periodontal infection, is cause for concern during pregnancy. In fact, pregnant women who have periodontal disease may be more likely to have a baby that is born too early and too small!

To prevent pregnancy gingivitis it’s especially important to practice good oral hygiene habits, which include brushing at least twice a day, flossing once a day, and using an antimicrobial mouth rinse. If you are due for a professional cleaning, don’t skip it simply because you are pregnant.  Now more than ever, professional dental cleanings are particularly important.

Oral contraceptives – while women are taking drugs to help treat periodontal disease, such as antibiotics, may lessen the effect of an oral contraceptive.  So be sure and consult your dentist about all the medications you are taking.

Menopause and Post-Menopause – not surprising given all the changes happening within your body, but you may experience changes in your mouth as well.  You may notice discomfort such as dry mouth, pain and burning sensations in the gum tissue and altered taste, particularly to salt and pepper.

In addition, menopausal gingivostomatitis affects a small percentage of women. Gums that look dry or shiny or bleed easily and range from abnormally pale to deep red may indicate this condition. Most women find that estrogen supplements help to relieve these symptoms.[7]

Bone loss is potentially associated with both periodontal disease and osteoporosis. Women considering Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) to help fight osteoporosis should note that this may help protect their teeth and your jawbone as well as other parts of the body.

What Should You Do?

See a dental professional for cleaning at least twice a year – you need to monitor your oral health.

If referred, see a periodontist in your area. Problems may include: Bleeding gums during brushing, red, swollen or tender gums.   Other issues such as persistent bad breath or pus between the teeth and gums.  If you’re a denture wearer a change in the fit of your dentures may occur.

Keep your dentist informed about any medications you are taking and any changes in your health history.

Brush and floss properly every day.  Review your techniques with a dental professional.

If there any questions that you might have, please call us to discuss them.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Related articles

 


[1] January 1999 issue of the Journal of Periodontology

[2] Periodontitis is an advanced state of periodontal disease in which there is active destruction of the periodontal supporting tissues.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] WebMd. Pregnancy Gingivitis and Pregnancy Tumors.

[7] Women and Gums: American Academy of Periodontology Journal. http://www.perio.org/consumer/women.htm.