Alpharetta Dentist: Bad Breath

bad breathBad breath, also called halitosis (hal-lih-TOH-suhss) can be caused by several things, including:

•Poor oral hygiene

•Some foods

•Dentures

•Gum disease

•Dry mouth

•Tobacco use

•Respiratory, digestive, or other health problems

•Some medicines

Practicing good oral hygiene and avoiding tobacco and some foods often helps people with bad-smelling breath. You may want to try using a tongue scraper to clean food from your tongue. You could also just brush your tongue with your toothbrush. But if doing so doesn’t seem to help or if you always need mouthwash to hide bad breath, talk to your dentist.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

Dentist Alpharetta: Seniors Can Keep Their Teeth for a Lifetime

mature womanSurveys by the American Dental Association and Oral B® reveal that 7 in 10 respondents 65 years of age and older visit their dentist at least once a year and almost all said they believe that healthy teeth and gums are important. It’s great to know that seniors are concerned about their oral health, because dental needs change as we age.

Unfortunately, cavities are not just for kids.  All throughout our lives, carbohydrate-containing foods team up with bacteria in the mouth to produce cavity-forming acids.  Seniors often have receding gums that expose the sensitive roots of the teeth to cavities.[1]  These cavities should be filled as soon as possible to avoid further damage to the teeth.  Seniors should try to brush teeth 2-3 times a day and floss at least once daily.  To reduce the risk of cavities, it is recommended to use fluoride toothpaste and a mouth-rinse containing fluoride.[2]

Periodontal disease or gum disease is the main reason people lose their teeth. Gum disease is caused by plaque, a bacterial film that continuously forms around the teeth. Although gum disease is often painless until it is very advanced, some signs of gum disease include: bleeding gums after eating or brushing your teeth, persistent bad breath; swollen gums; loose teeth; a change in the fit of partial dentures; or permanent tooth loss.

The effects of gum disease become cumulative as we age.  And as much you participate in maintaining a healthy mouth, only your dentist or hygienist can clean the plaque and tartar under the gum line to help reduce the damage of gum disease. As with cavity prevention, daily brushing and flossing are essential. Regular dental cleanings and dental exams are important. Seniors with gum disease should see their dentist 3-4 times a year, regardless of your insurance coverage.

Seniors who have worn dentures for many years may find that they don’t seem to fit as well anymore. Loose dentures make it difficult to eat and speak (they seem to make a “clacking” noise), and do not support the face as well.  This is going to be a result of bone recession.  Your dentist can sometimes remedy the problem by relining the denture, but a new denture should be made every 5-7 years, or when the dentures cannot be used comfortably.

If we can be of help, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com


[1] Check on the tongue side of teeth and look for a receding gum line.  Or has the gum that used to fill the gap between your teeth opened to the point that now there’s a dark void between your teeth.  These are signs of your gum recession.

[2] In addition, you’re really not too old to have sealants painted on your teeth.

Alpharetta Dentist: OUR PHILOSOPHY

GMOM
Dr. Novy Scheinfeld, Dr. Tourial and Melanie at GMOM

Always put the patient first.

From its inception, Scheinfelds, Orland and Tourial has focused on providing the right solution for every patient, every time. We do not waiver from this commitment. While many practices claim to put their patients first, few are able to resist the temptation to make small sacrifices to increase their revenues. Scheinfelds, Orland and Tourial has steadfastly refused to make any change in the treatment that does not offer a tangible benefit to our patients.

Don’t be all things to all people.

Scheinfelds, Orland and Tourial believes in specialization. It is one of the many things that make us revolutionary. Every decision we make, new person hired or new technology solution launched is aimed at expanding and deepening our specialization differentiation. We know taking our eye off this goal would be a costly injustice to our patients. We are proud to say that our patients represent long and endearing relationships that span several generations over 25 years.

Don’t push products.

At Scheinfelds, Orland and Tourial, we take a consultative approach to ensuring each patient’s program aligns with their operating culture and unique risk exposures. This means we don’t believe in pushing products. We don’t try and sell you anything. Instead, we work closely with our patients and their needs to develop and deliver the right solution, even if that means not doing any dentistry at all.

Integrity in all that we do.

Events over the past decade have caused significant upheaval in the health insurance business and we are constantly navigating the industry to make sure you receive the coverage and care you deserve. These changing times are reflective of changing patient needs and a requirement for operational disclosure.

From the beginning, Scheinfelds, Orland and Tourial built its foundation on basic operating principles – integrity, honesty and quality health care. These are not just words to us, rather truths that can be validated by the patient relationships we have held for over 25 years. To us, it’s simple. We base decisions on what we believe to be in the best interests of our patients and our employees. We understand that each puts a great deal of trust in us, and we do not take that trust lightly.

Be passionate.

Scheinfelds, Orland and Tourial’s culture is unlike any in the industry. We emphasize team achievements and pride in individual accomplishments that contribute to the patient’s overall success. Ideas are traded, tested and put into practice with the highest degree of passion and excitement. Meetings that would take hours elsewhere are frequently little more than a conversation in the hall, and few walls separate those who are performing the procedures to our next technology innovation from those that created our foundation of dentistry. Our highly communicative environment fosters productivity, creativity and camaraderie fueled by the realization that some of the most wonderful people rely on Scheinfelds, Orland and Tourial. We are passionate about what we do and believe in giving the proper tools to a group of people driven to make a difference, and they do.

Hopefully, this is what you want from your Dental team.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

http://www.rightsmilecenter.com

Alpharetta Dentist: Oral Health During Pregnancy

Pregnant2Apparently, oral health care during pregnancy is often misunderstood by treating physicians and their patients. Every pregnant woman should be screened for oral risks, educated about proper oral hygiene, and referred to a dentist where treatment may be necessary.[1] Dental procedures such as periodontal treatment, restorations, and extractions are safe and are best performed during the second trimester. We are hesitant to perform diagnostic radiography regardless of the accepted practice that it’s safe.  Xylitol and chlorhexidine[2] may be used as adjuvant therapy for high-risk mothers in the early postpartum period to reduce transmission of cariogenic bacteria to their infants.[3] Appropriate dental care and prevention during pregnancy may reduce poor prenatal outcomes and decrease infant caries.[4]

Every pregnant woman should be assessed by a dentist for dental hygiene habits, access to fluoridated water, oral problems (e.g., caries, gingivitis), and continued access to dental care.[5]  Patients should be counseled to perform routine brushing and flossing, to avoid excessive amounts of sugary snacks and drinks, and to consult a dentist.[6]  Many dentists are reported to be reluctant to treat pregnant women.[7] Optimally, physicians and dentists can overcome this situation through education, clear communication, and the development of ongoing collaborative relationships. Physicians can share information on the safety of dental treatment in pregnancy with dental colleagues and provide clear referral recommendations.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

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[2] Teratogenic Effects Pregnancy Category B. Reproduction studies have been performed in rats and rabbits at Chlorhexidine gluconate doses up to 300 mg/kg/day and 40 mg/kg/day, respectively, and have not revealed evidence of harm to fetus. However, adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women have not been done. Because animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response, this drug should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed. http://www.drugs.com/pro/chlorhexidine.html

 

[3] http://www.mchaccess.org/pdfs/alerts/oral%20health%20during%20pregnancy.pdf.  HUGH SILK, MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School and Family Medicine Residency Program, Worcester, Massachusetts. ALAN B. DOUGLASS, MD, Family Medicine Residency Program, Middlesex Hospital, Middletown, Connecticut.  JOANNA M. DOUGLASS, BDS, DDS, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut.  LAURA SILK, MD, Health Alliance, Leominster, Massachusetts.

 

[4] Am Fam Physician. 2008;77(8):1139-1144. Copyright © 2008 American Academy of Family Physicians.

 

[5] Oral examination should include the teeth, gums, tongue, palate, and mucosa.

 

[7] Livingston HM, Dellinger TM, Holder R. Considerations in the management of the pregnant patient. Spec Care Dentist. 1998;18(5):183-188

Alpharetta Dentist: Clark Howard or Real Oral Health Care?

mature women smiling3In response to Clark Howard’s opinion on dentists and mid-level providers, he’s dead wrong or could be.[1]  And he doesn’t understand the sector of patients who do and don’t seek to have proper oral health care.  If Mr. Howard had a heart-attack today, price of care would be the last thing on his mind.  Would he negotiate before they installed the stint or after?[2]  His perspective is steeped in ignorance. The answer is not as Mr. Howard would suggest, devoting energy and time and money to creating a lesser trained dental provider to deliver a poor approximation of comprehensive dental care (in Georgia). [3] This opinion comes from the lack of understanding of what a dentist is trained to do.  Clark Howard is living back in the 20’s, the 1820’s, where the only thing a dentist did was pull teeth and cut hair.

A recent example in our office was the discovery of suspicious cells on the underside of the patient’s tongue.  Ultimately (and hopefully), our discovery and recommendation will save this patients life.  Our early detection of cancer comes from years of (university) training and experience that transcends the old view of what a dentist does for that 15 minute examination during your regularly scheduled hygiene appointment.  Contrary to your physician’s health care, the cost of delivering dentistry is under constant pressures from the free market system and yet when adjusted for inflation the cost of delivering dentistry is the same cost it was in 1982.

The answer to providing adequate and broad based oral health care lies in educating patients about the value of good oral health, who can best deliver the care, and how consumers can obtain and maintain that care.  Marred by an old view of dentists and dentistry, Mr. Howard is stuck in a mindset that all dentists do is just drill-and-fill.  There is much more to the art and science of dentistry than Clark Howard is remotely aware.

Our society needs to understand the need to regularly maintain their oral health and that dental care for them and their families is not optional.  We need to instill in our society the need to maintain an oral health care regimen and visiting the dentist is a part of that regimen.  I find it interesting that Clark Howard wants to put you in a position where you bargain for your health care needs.[4]  Where he fails in his advice is to differentiate between oral health care and retail dentistry.

With regards to the specific point of creating mid-level providers as has happened in Alaska, census data demonstrates that 43% of our “public” health care providers aren’t busy because patients don’t show up for their appointments. This is not a lack of dentists, rather a lack of utilization of the care available.  While there is no empirical evidence as to ‘why’, one would speculate it is because like Clark Howard, a large portion of the public fail to value the real benefits to oral health care.  Take a credible, but uninformed spokesperson like Clark Howard, and the notion that all dentists do is drill-and-fill and we, as providers are starting 10 yards behind the starting line.

The real solution is better patient education.

If we can answer your questions or you have comments, please feel free to weigh in on this matter.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

Related Articles

https://therightsmile.wordpress.com/2012/10/17/cheap-dental-implants-not-so-fast/

https://therightsmile.wordpress.com/2012/07/02/dentist-atlanta-the-difference-between-dental-and-physician-health-care-costs/


[4] This isn’t to suggest that we as a discipline of health care aren’t competitive.  The free market system has kept dentistry fairly moderate in terms of cost compared to the annual leaps in insurance coverage and physician/hospital care.

Alpharetta Dentistry: WELCOME TO THE RIGHT SMILE CENTER

mature womanYour smile is our top priority. Drs. Scheinfelds, Orland and  Tourial are committed to making your visit a comfortable and valued experience.  We know your smile is about more than just your teeth, so in delivering the right smile, we deliver state-of-the-art dental care with a gentle, concerned personal touch.

From general dentistry to cosmetic dentistry to in-house prosthodontics, endodontics and implant placements, we provide you and your family with comprehensive, affordable and high-quality care. Make an appointment now or give us a call for more information. Together we can help you achieve the right smile of your dreams.

For a greater understanding of our philosophy and what we can do for your oral health care and personal image please go to:

www.rightsmilecenter.com

and for patient reviews please visit:

www.rightsmilecenter.com/reviews.html

Call for a complementary consultation.  If we can be of service or answer any of your concerns please contact us.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC

290 Carpenter Drive, 200A

Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328

404-256-3620

www.rightsmilecenter.com

info@rightsmilecenter.com

 

 

Thank you for all your referrals.  We truly appreciate them.

Information included is not dental or medical advice.  For your specific information

 be sure to consult your dentist.

 

Related articles

Alpharetta Cosmetic Dentist = Prosthodontist

UniqueIt seems to be prevalent in that most dentists these days are calling themselves ‘cosmetic dentists’, when in reality there is no cosmetic specialty in dentistry.   All dentistry is cosmetic.  It’s just some dentists are trained to do it better than others.  I don’t know anyone who took the ‘ugly’ teeth class in dental school, because obviously, tongue in cheek, it doesn’t exist.  Regardless, the fact remains that the majority of dentists are general dentists and call themselves self-ordained ‘cosmetic dentists’.   They all have undergraduate degrees with either a BA or BS and at least four years of dental school with either a DDS or a DMD.  But not one of them has a ‘cosmetic specialty’ in dentistry.   Those dentists who choose to make the claim do so by virtue of deciding to focus on cosmetics in their general practices.

The American Dental Association (ADA) recognizes only nine post dental degree specialties and cosmetic dentistry is not one of them.  The closest post doctorate degree to a ‘cosmetic dentist’ specialty is prosthodontics.

Prosthodontics: (crown, bridge, and implants) A Prosthodontist has a dental specialty license pertaining to the diagnosis, treatment planning, rehabilitation and maintenance of the oral function, comfort, appearance and health of patients with clinical conditions associated with missing or deficient teeth and/or oral and maxillofacial tissues using biocompatible substitutes.

Of the 170,000 dentists in the U.S. only 3,200 are trained prosthodontists.  Of those Forbes magazine estimates 560 are practicing prosthodontists.  The so called ‘cosmetic dentists’ take short continuing education courses together with trial and error to create what a prosthodontist is trained to do in their ADA sanctioned[1] post graduate work.   The prosthodontist is trained for 3 years at a university to create the smile that implements the use of veneers, crowns, bridges and now the standard of care procedure of dental implants to ensure that the right smile is achieved both functionally and aesthetically.  If anyone has a specialty in cosmetic dentistry, it would be the prosthodontist.  So when you are seriously looking for a cosmetic dentist, look for a pro, a prosthodontist.

Novy Scheinfeld, DDS, PC
290 Carpenter Drive, 200A
Atlanta (Sandy Springs), GA 30328
404-256-3620

info@rightsmilecenter.com

www.rightsmilecenter.com

 

Thank you for all your referrals.  We truly appreciate them.

Information included is not dental or medical advice.  For your specific information

 be sure to consult your dentist.

 

Related articles


[1] ADA sanctioned means at a University.